1

The blower motor housing is shot. both left and right side. I got the right side off pretty easy but the left side looks not so easy. If I am looking at it correctly, it looks like the heater core hose and the a/c has to be disconnected (unfortunately this would make sense). I have never removed/unplugged an a/c before. The heater core should be as easy as catching what drains out and pouring it back in when I'm done.

What are the steps for removing and reconnecting the a/c unit and what pitfalls should I watch out for?

  • I would bet you're right about having to disconnect hoses, but don't know for sure by just looking at an image on Google. If you do have to disconnect the A/C hose, you should take it to a shop which will be able to completely remove all of the refrigerant from the system prior to opening it up. After you get the hose off, you'll need to get a new drier to replace the old one: once exposed to atmosphere they're on the way out. Once you get everything back together, you can take it back to the shop which purged your system and have them refill for you, as it should be discounted (but not free). – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Oct 2 '14 at 20:24
  • I'm just curious why you don't just try to fix the old one? Is it that far gone? Is it too busted up where you can't use some fiberglass/resin to reinforce what's good? It's amazing what you can do with the stuff. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Oct 2 '14 at 20:25
  • @Paulster2 Right after I read your outstanding response, I went and googled 1 last time and found this website that broke the whole process down p71.ca/P71interceptor.com/p71interceptor.com/dashboard/remove/… It looks like the blower motor housing connects/sandwiches together right where the a/s lines are. It looks like I won't need to remove the a/c lines. The housing is shot on the right side and cost $50 on ebay. After removing it, I noticed no screws or bottom. The left side is $500. Pulling it off and using fiberglass and resin. – brad Oct 2 '14 at 21:37
  • Any pitfalls you can think of? It looks like I will need to jack the car up to get to the fender panel and a couple of awkwardly placed screws. But other than catching some radiator fluid, it doesn't look to bad... What do you think? – brad Oct 2 '14 at 21:38
  • @Paulster2 PS, I believe this is the part number 1w1z19850ca . Post as a reply and I will click the button! :) – brad Oct 2 '14 at 21:39
1

I would bet you're right about having to disconnect hoses, but don't know for sure by just looking at an image on Google. If you do have to disconnect the A/C hose, you should take it to a shop which will be able to completely remove all of the refrigerant from the system prior to opening it up. After you get the hose off, you'll need to get a new drier to replace the old one: once exposed to atmosphere they're on the way out. Once you get everything back together, you can take it back to the shop which purged your system and have them refill for you, as it should be discounted (but not free).

NOTE: The reason you'd want to have them empty the system is that if you break the lines and the refrigerant dumps out, you can get freeze-burns from it. Not a good thing to have a digit get frozen ...

I'm just curious why you don't just try to fix the old one? Is it that far gone? Is it too busted up where you can't use some fiberglass/resin to reinforce what's good? It's amazing what you can do with the stuff.

As far as pitfalls, I wouldn't think you'd run into any trouble besides keeping track of parts when you pull it all apart. The link you posted in the comments looks like a disaster! Just keep everything tidy and in order and you shouldn't have any issues.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.