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I recently got a car with frameless side windows. Whenever a door handle is touched, the door window is automatically slightly lowered to release it from upper sealing. During winters, temperatures are often freezing around here and with past cars, I've sometimes noticed window glass being frozen stuck to seals, but then I've had not much incentive to open them anyway. Gut feeling tells me that with this car, a frozen window would mean the door wouldn't open, making the car completely unusable.

How should I maintain my power windows so they wouldn't freeze stuck during winter?

Should it matter, the car is an Opel Astra G cabrio, but AFAIK many other cars, e.g. Volkswagen Eos, Nissan 350z, Peugeot 406 Coupe, Ford Focus CC etc. also behave the same.

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You can apply car wax to the top/side weatherstrip - frost won't stick to wax. I don't like the fact that it automatically energizes the window, though; I've seen an awful lot of window bottom weatherstrips destroyed when heavily frosted windows were rolled down further than about 1/8". You live in a climate very similar to my own, too. You may be forced to cover the windows with magnet-mounted fabric or plastic to prevent damage to that bottom weatherstrip - let the fabric or plastic collect all the frost, leaving the window clear.

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Put some WD-40 onto a rag and wipe the seal area with it. The "WD" stands for water displacement. When applied, it will keep the moisture off of the seal so there will be nothing there to freeze to the window.

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    I actually thought of that, but there are three properties of WD-40 making me hesitate to try this out: 1) harmful to rubber in prolonged/repeated application 2) attracting dirt 3) leaving oily residue on glass when applied to the bottom seals. – Imre Sep 2 '14 at 6:24
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In Upstate New York, we have 4 Seasons Winter, Winter, Winter, and Summer. Silicon rubber dressing WORKS (such as Armor All!!!!), it is thick, use poly cloth to apply sparingly to weather strip where door and window freezes. Do 3 or 4 times a season.

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As you live in an area of the world that has extremely cold weather, your vehicle supplier may have something on his shelf for just a situation. Here in the UK we see this type of window, Peugeots and VW's in particular, but do not seem to suffer this problem.

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