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First of all check if your compressor hasn't seized yet. Very simple. Engine off and keys in pocket, reach for the compressor's clutch hub (the flat part in front of the pulley) in the engine bay and turn it with your hands for some turns. You should feel smooth and uniform resistance across one whole turn. If not, the compressor's bad.

If the compressor's good, then turn AC (or defroster) on and visually check for clutch hub rotation. If it's stationary, then you might either be too low on refrigerant or the clutch assembly might be defective.

If the clutch doesn't engage with AC on, locate the compressor's power terminals and, with a multimeter, check for voltage coming to the terminals from the engine harness. With AC turned on and engine on, you should get 13-14 volts if the ECM/low pressure switch is powering the compressor on (which means enough refrigerant to allow compressor operation).

The compressor, being of the scroll type, should have a thermal switch on the body and this may make checking for clutch coil resistance (a good clutch coil should have a resistance between 3 and 6 Ohm) difficult if the thermal switch has failed (as with any part subject to wear, they can fail and cease conductivity).

If the compressor clutch is actually engaging with AC on and engine on, then you should be looking at how, and most importantly how frequently it cycles, in addition to touching the lines and feeling for their temperature. And only then you may look at a charge issue (which you shouldn't ever solve with the canned refrigerant: go have the system serviced by a licensed professional equipped with a recovery station).

2008 sounds too late to come equipped with the Keihin compressor (the one giving trouble). You more than likely have the Sanden one.

First of all check if your compressor hasn't seized yet. Very simple. Engine off and keys in pocket, reach for the compressor's clutch hub (the flat part in front of the pulley) in the engine bay and turn it with your hands for some turns. You should feel smooth and uniform resistance across one whole turn. If not, the compressor's bad.

If the compressor's good, then turn AC (or defroster) on and visually check for clutch hub rotation. If it's stationary, then you might either be too low on refrigerant or the clutch assembly might be defective.

If the clutch doesn't engage with AC on, locate the compressor's power terminals and, with a multimeter, check for voltage coming to the terminals from the engine harness. With AC turned on and engine on, you should get 13-14 volts if the ECM/low pressure switch is powering the compressor on (which means enough refrigerant to allow compressor operation).

The compressor, being of the scroll type, should have a thermal switch on the body and this may make checking for clutch coil resistance (a good clutch coil should have a resistance between 3 and 6 Ohm) difficult if the thermal switch has failed.

If the compressor clutch is actually engaging with AC on and engine on, then you should be looking at how, and most importantly how frequently it cycles, in addition to touching the lines and feeling for their temperature. And only then you may look at a charge issue (which you shouldn't ever solve with the canned refrigerant: go have the system serviced by a licensed professional equipped with a recovery station).

2008 sounds too late to come equipped with the Keihin compressor (the one giving trouble). You more than likely have the Sanden one.

First of all check if your compressor hasn't seized yet. Very simple. Engine off and keys in pocket, reach for the compressor's clutch hub (the flat part in front of the pulley) in the engine bay and turn it with your hands for some turns. You should feel smooth and uniform resistance across one whole turn. If not, the compressor's bad.

If the compressor's good, then turn AC (or defroster) on and visually check for clutch hub rotation. If it's stationary, then you might either be too low on refrigerant or the clutch assembly might be defective.

If the clutch doesn't engage with AC on, locate the compressor's power terminals and, with a multimeter, check for voltage coming to the terminals from the engine harness. With AC turned on and engine on, you should get 13-14 volts if the ECM/low pressure switch is powering the compressor on (which means enough refrigerant to allow compressor operation).

The compressor, being of the scroll type, should have a thermal switch on the body and this may make checking for clutch coil resistance (a good clutch coil should have a resistance between 3 and 6 Ohm) difficult if the thermal switch has failed (as with any part subject to wear, they can fail and cease conductivity).

If the compressor clutch is actually engaging with AC on and engine on, then you should be looking at how, and most importantly how frequently it cycles, in addition to touching the lines and feeling for their temperature. And only then you may look at a charge issue (which you shouldn't ever solve with the canned refrigerant: go have the system serviced by a licensed professional equipped with a recovery station).

2008 sounds too late to come equipped with the Keihin compressor (the one giving trouble). You more than likely have the Sanden one.

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source | link

First of all check if your compressor hasn't seized yet. Very simple. Engine off and keys in pocket, reach for the compressor's clutch hub (the flat part in front of the pulley) in the engine bay and turn it with your hands for some turns. You should feel smooth and uniform resistance across one whole turn. If not, the compressor's bad.

If the compressor's good, then turn AC (or defroster) on and visually check for clutch hub rotation. If it's stationary, then you might either be too low on refrigerant or the clutch assembly might be defective.

If the clutch doesn't engage with AC on, locate the compressor's power terminals and, with a multimeter, check for voltage coming to the terminals from the engine harness. With AC turned on and engine on, you should get 13-14 volts if the ECM/low pressure switch is powering the compressor on (which means enough refrigerant to allow compressor operation).

The compressor, being of the scroll type, should have a thermal switch on the body and this may make checking for clutch coil resistance (a good clutch coil should have a resistance between 3 and 6 Ohm) difficult if the thermal switch has failed.

If the compressor clutch is actually engaging with AC on and engine on, then you should be looking at how, and most importantly how frequently it cycles, in addition to touching the lines and feeling for their temperature. And only then you may look at a charge issue (which you shouldn't ever solve with the canned refrigerant: go have the system serviced by a licensed professional equipped with a recovery station).

2008 sounds too late to come equipped with the Keihin compressor (the one giving trouble). You more than likely have the Sanden one.