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While the twist/tape method will make the connections and work, I tend to leave this for the quick fix. Over time, with the everyday vibrations occurring, this method tends to allow for continuity issues and things stop functioning.

Another easy type fix is wire nuts. This takes very little time, is more secure than the twist/tape method, and doesn't require any special tools. Like the twist/tape method, wire nuts can loosen up over time and come lose, but would usually last longer than the twist/tape method, plus while the nut is in place there's virtually no chance of a stray wire poking out and causing grounding issues. (Added from a comment by Nate Eldredge ... thanks for the add!)

An intermediate type fix is to use crimped butt connectors. When done correctly, this method has great longevity, but may have issues down the line. They are not impervious to vibrations or poor application. This requires the use of crimpers and the butt connectors themselves, so take a little more time than the twist/tape method. Also, the quality of the butt connectors has a large bearing on the finished product.

The far better method for a permanent fix is to solder and heat shrink application. This takes a little bit of skill, some additional tools (soldering iron), and some time. When done correctly, the connections are usually permanent and there aren't any further issues with them.

All-in-all, there's no wrong way to do it as long as there's a connection and what you are fixing works in the end. I'd suggest there are better ways of doing it, which I think I reflected in my write up.

While the twist/tape method will make the connections and work, I tend to leave this for the quick fix. Over time, with the everyday vibrations occurring, this method tends to allow for continuity issues and things stop functioning.

An intermediate type fix is to use crimped butt connectors. When done correctly, this method has great longevity, but may have issues down the line. They are not impervious to vibrations or poor application. This requires the use of crimpers and the butt connectors themselves, so take a little more time than the twist/tape method. Also, the quality of the butt connectors has a large bearing on the finished product.

The far better method for a permanent fix is to solder and heat shrink application. This takes a little bit of skill, some additional tools (soldering iron), and some time. When done correctly, the connections are usually permanent and there aren't any further issues with them.

All-in-all, there's no wrong way to do it as long as there's a connection and what you are fixing works in the end. I'd suggest there are better ways of doing it, which I think I reflected in my write up.

While the twist/tape method will make the connections and work, I tend to leave this for the quick fix. Over time, with the everyday vibrations occurring, this method tends to allow for continuity issues and things stop functioning.

Another easy type fix is wire nuts. This takes very little time, is more secure than the twist/tape method, and doesn't require any special tools. Like the twist/tape method, wire nuts can loosen up over time and come lose, but would usually last longer than the twist/tape method, plus while the nut is in place there's virtually no chance of a stray wire poking out and causing grounding issues. (Added from a comment by Nate Eldredge ... thanks for the add!)

An intermediate type fix is to use crimped butt connectors. When done correctly, this method has great longevity, but may have issues down the line. They are not impervious to vibrations or poor application. This requires the use of crimpers and the butt connectors themselves, so take a little more time than the twist/tape method. Also, the quality of the butt connectors has a large bearing on the finished product.

The far better method for a permanent fix is to solder and heat shrink application. This takes a little bit of skill, some additional tools (soldering iron), and some time. When done correctly, the connections are usually permanent and there aren't any further issues with them.

All-in-all, there's no wrong way to do it as long as there's a connection and what you are fixing works in the end. I'd suggest there are better ways of doing it, which I think I reflected in my write up.

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While the twist/tape method will make the connections and work, I tend to leave this for the quick fix. Over time, with the everyday vibrations occurring, this method tends to allow for continuity issues and things stop functioning.

An intermediate type fix is to use crimped butt connectors. When done correctly, this method has great longevity, but may have issues down the line. They are not impervious to vibrations or poor application. This requires the use of crimpers and the butt connectors themselves, so take a little more time than the twist/tape method. Also, the quality of the butt connectors has a large bearing on the finished product.

The far better method for a permanent fix is to solder and heat shrink application. This takes a little bit of skill, some additional tools (soldering iron), and some time. When done correctly, the connections are usually permanent and there aren't any further issues with them.

All-in-all, therethere's no wrong way to do it as long as there's a connection and what you are fixing works in the end. I'd suggest there are better ways of doing it, which I think I reflected in my write up.

While the twist/tape method will make the connections and work, I tend to leave this for the quick fix. Over time, with the everyday vibrations occurring, this method tends to allow for continuity issues and things stop functioning.

An intermediate type fix is to use crimped butt connectors. When done correctly, this method has great longevity, but may have issues down the line. They are not impervious to vibrations or poor application. This requires the use of crimpers and the butt connectors themselves, so take a little more time than the twist/tape method. Also, the quality of the butt connectors has a large bearing on the finished product.

The far better method for a permanent fix is to solder and heat shrink application. This takes a little bit of skill, some additional tools (soldering iron), and some time. When done correctly, the connections are usually permanent and there aren't any further issues with them.

All-in-all, there no wrong way to do it as long as there's a connection and what you are fixing works in the end. I'd suggest there are better ways of doing it, which I think I reflected in my write up.

While the twist/tape method will make the connections and work, I tend to leave this for the quick fix. Over time, with the everyday vibrations occurring, this method tends to allow for continuity issues and things stop functioning.

An intermediate type fix is to use crimped butt connectors. When done correctly, this method has great longevity, but may have issues down the line. They are not impervious to vibrations or poor application. This requires the use of crimpers and the butt connectors themselves, so take a little more time than the twist/tape method. Also, the quality of the butt connectors has a large bearing on the finished product.

The far better method for a permanent fix is to solder and heat shrink application. This takes a little bit of skill, some additional tools (soldering iron), and some time. When done correctly, the connections are usually permanent and there aren't any further issues with them.

All-in-all, there's no wrong way to do it as long as there's a connection and what you are fixing works in the end. I'd suggest there are better ways of doing it, which I think I reflected in my write up.

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While the twist/tape method will make the connections and work, I tend to leave this for the quick fix. Over time, with the everyday vibrations occurring, this method tends to allow for continuity issues and things stop functioning.

An intermediate type fix is to use crimped butt connectors. When done correctly, this method has great longevity, but may have issues down the line. They are not impervious to vibrations or poor application. This requires the use of crimpers and the butt connectors themselves, so take a little more time than the twist/tape method. Also, the quality of the butt connectors has a large bearing on the finished product.

The far better method for a permanent fix is to solder and heat shrink application. This takes a little bit of skill, some additional tools (soldering iron), and some time. When done correctly, the connections are usually permanent and there aren't any further issues with them.

All-in-all, there no wrong way to do it as long as there's a connection and what you are fixing works in the end. I'd suggest there are better ways of doing it, which I think I reflected in my write up.