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The safest way to test if you're not SURE of what you're doing (and to avoid other issues like bad lead connections) is to use a clamp meter. These are capable of measuring AC and DC voltage and amperage by simply clamping the wire. You don't have to disconnect anything for this to work. Not to mention that measuring this ONE wire coming right off of the battery probably isn't going to tell you much... even if you do determine that there is a reading of several amps coming off of your battery, you still have to track that down. The clamp meter would be better suited for the needle-in-a-haystack search than your traditional probe meter anyway.

Here's an example of one such meter: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200460552_200460552

If you go this route, make sure you buy a clamp meter advertised to measure amperage on both AC AND DC. Some of them are AC only, for some reason.

EDIT: After I answered this I started thinking about why some clamps can't read DC amperage and looked it up. This is somewhat anecdotal as it does not answer the question, but it might be interesting to some people. Apparently, clamp meters use electromagnetic induction to read AC amperage, but this is not possible on DC. The clamps are constructed slightly different to make this possible. See this link for a more in-depth explanation: http://www.kew-ltd.co.jp/en/support/mame_02.html

The safest way to test if you're not SURE of what you're doing (and to avoid other issues like bad lead connections) is to use a clamp meter. These are capable of measuring AC and DC voltage and amperage by simply clamping the wire. You don't have to disconnect anything for this to work. Not to mention that measuring this ONE wire coming right off of the battery probably isn't going to tell you much... even if you do determine that there is a reading of several amps coming off of your battery, you still have to track that down. The clamp meter would be better suited for the needle-in-a-haystack search than your traditional probe meter anyway.

Here's an example of one such meter: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200460552_200460552

If you go this route, make sure you buy a clamp meter advertised to measure amperage on both AC AND DC. Some of them are AC only, for some reason.

The safest way to test if you're not SURE of what you're doing (and to avoid other issues like bad lead connections) is to use a clamp meter. These are capable of measuring AC and DC voltage and amperage by simply clamping the wire. You don't have to disconnect anything for this to work. Not to mention that measuring this ONE wire coming right off of the battery probably isn't going to tell you much... even if you do determine that there is a reading of several amps coming off of your battery, you still have to track that down. The clamp meter would be better suited for the needle-in-a-haystack search than your traditional probe meter anyway.

Here's an example of one such meter: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200460552_200460552

If you go this route, make sure you buy a clamp meter advertised to measure amperage on both AC AND DC. Some of them are AC only, for some reason.

EDIT: After I answered this I started thinking about why some clamps can't read DC amperage and looked it up. This is somewhat anecdotal as it does not answer the question, but it might be interesting to some people. Apparently, clamp meters use electromagnetic induction to read AC amperage, but this is not possible on DC. The clamps are constructed slightly different to make this possible. See this link for a more in-depth explanation: http://www.kew-ltd.co.jp/en/support/mame_02.html

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The safest way to test if you're not SURE of what you're doing (and to avoid other issues like bad lead connections) is to use a clamp meter. These are capable of measuring AC and DC voltage and amperage by simply clamping the wire. You don't have to disconnect anything for this to work. Not to mention that measuring this ONE wire coming right off of the battery probably isn't going to tell you much... even if you do determine that there is a reading of several amps coming off of your battery, you still have to track that down. The clamp meter would be better suited for the needle-in-a-haystack search than your traditional probe meter anyway.

Here's an example of one such meter: http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200460552_200460552

If you go this route, make sure you buy a clamp meter advertised to measure amperage on both AC AND DC. Some of them are AC only, for some reason.