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This could be a case of ice formation near the expansion valve. After the compressor runs for a certain period of time, the freon flow would be choked and would resume after a while when the ice has melted away. Ice formation can occur if somehow moisture got introduced into the system.

As an experiment to pin point the problem, you can have your AC blow hothot air and see if that improves the time that the system takes to start cooling again normally.

This could be a case of ice formation near the expansion valve. After the compressor runs for a certain period of time, the freon flow would be choked and would resume after a while when the ice has melted away. Ice formation can occur if somehow moisture got introduced into the system.

As an experiment to pin point the problem, you can have your AC blow hot air and see if that improves the time that the system takes to start cooling again normally.

This could be a case of ice formation near the expansion valve. After the compressor runs for a certain period of time, the freon flow would be choked and would resume after a while when the ice has melted away. Ice formation can occur if somehow moisture got introduced into the system.

As an experiment to pin point the problem, you can have your AC blow hot air and see if that improves the time that the system takes to start cooling again normally.

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source | link

This could be a case of ice formation near the expansion valve. After the compressor runs for a certain period of time, the freon flow would be choked and would resume after a while when the ice has melted away. Ice formation can occur if somehow moisture got introduced into the system.

As an experiment to pin point the problem, you can have your AC blow hot air and see if that improves the time that the system takes to start cooling again normally.