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Feb
11
comment How to apply brakes so there is minimal wear and tear?
@IhavenoideawhatI'mdoing - Yes. My assumption with case B is that the initial brake is done with the intent of having the car basically roll to a stop or near stop with no (or minimal) further braking, and executed with a reasonably good level of accuracy. If that doesn't happen and you still have to slam on the brakes to avoid overshooting then it won't have the same sort of beneficial effect.
Feb
11
comment How to apply brakes so there is minimal wear and tear?
@IhavenoideawhatI'mdoing - The total amount of energy? Yes, that's the same. But it doesn't end up in the same place. In 'A' and 'C', basically all of the energy goes into/through the brake pads. In 'B', some (the first 20km/h of deceleration) of the energy goes into/through the brake pads. The rest is dissipated through other means, such as wind resistance (energy into the car's body and the surrounding air), the car's rolling resistance (energy into the axles, wheels, and road surface), etc.. If you want to send less energy into your brake pads, 'B' is what does it.
Feb
11
awarded  Self-Learner
Feb
11
comment How to apply brakes so there is minimal wear and tear?
The physics of the situation imply that the answer is the one that minimizes the amount of energy that your brakes must absorb (which is essentially converted into heat and lost). Which means 'B' is the correct answer if you want to reduce the wear on your brakes. Options 'A' and 'C' are nearly the same, although 'C' may come out slightly ahead of 'A' in that sometimes the light may turn green before you need to stop, in which case you don't have to brake at all.
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15
revised Difference between “Hypoid” and “Limslip” oils
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Sep
14
comment Difference between “Hypoid” and “Limslip” oils
Thanks for the tip. I checked the datasheet for the oil I purchased, and it says "All Penrite Limslip oils may be be used in conventional hypoid rear axles", so I feel reasonably comfortable that nothing bad is going to happen. The manual calls for a GL-5 oil (well actually it calls for Ford ESW-M2C108A, which appears to be comparable to GL-5), so I'm hoping that the corrosion/pH issue doesn't apply in this case.
Sep
14
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Sep
14
comment Difference between “Hypoid” and “Limslip” oils
I think you're right, the limslip oil was surprisingly expensive. I wasn't even paying attention to the prices at the time, as my theory was "well the fuel I put in my car costs less than $1.50 a liter, and oil is oil, so this shouldn't be too much more expensive than that". Turns out that theory was very incorrect.
Sep
14
accepted Difference between “Hypoid” and “Limslip” oils
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answered Radiator drain plug for Ford Falcon BA Mk2 Wagon