734 reputation
45
bio website
location Minnesota
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Aug 12 '13 at 19:05

Jun
7
comment What to check when buying a used car?
You don't have to do it on every car you look at, but I'd say it would be foolish to buy a used forced induction car without doing it. It's certainly much, much cheaper than the cost of repairing any problems that doing the test before buying would've exposed. And a compression tester can be purchased for under $50; performing the test is no more difficult than changing the spark plugs. If a shop quotes you several hundred dollars for it they are overcharging.
Dec
31
comment Help setting up Bi-Xenon lights with h4 wiring
The site I linked to, I think they will sell just the wiring harness and ballast controller module. If it's not in their online store you can probably just email them, @KeeganMcCarthy worth it imho.
Dec
26
comment Help setting up Bi-Xenon lights with h4 wiring
Long or short (and it will be short), it's still causing a hot re-strike which will shorten your bulb life (can't find any solid info on how much, but know that all factory systems implement measures to avoid hot re-strikes).
Oct
23
comment Where to buy interior parts, that OEM doesn't sell?
awesome..... :)
Oct
18
comment How effective are exhaust patch kits?
While I haven't used one of those patch kits, the link you posted states, "It is meant as a temporary, or short term repair for a broken or rusted tailpipe." Is a temporary or short-term repair what you are looking for?
Apr
26
comment Is Anti-Seize a lubricant, abrasive, or both?
"If it has threads and it's not part of a rotational mass like a driveshaft, clutch, or hub, I use it." Yes! +1
Apr
26
comment Cost of replacing struts on a 99 camry - and is it doable on our own?
Also, probably wise to have the alignment checked afterwards.
Apr
26
comment Cost of replacing struts on a 99 camry - and is it doable on our own?
I'll throw in there that while compressing the spring can be dangerous, it's not terribly complicated or easy to screw up. You rent or buy a specially shaped clamp that attaches to the spring and apply force to compress the spring so that it is not pushing against the top hat on the strut. Brian is correct that if it slips off it can launch with a great deal of force, however. Also, Brian's comments about accessing bolts and rust is spot on - that will determine the ease or difficulty of the job for a home mechanic.
Apr
17
comment High Octane petrol's effect on turbos
His Saab does not require a minimum of 93 octane. That is not even widely available; there are many areas where 91 is the highest commonly available octane. The owner's manual, as you suggest, will list the recommended octane for optimum performance (and mileage), and the minimum - which for Saab 9-3's is likely to be either 87 or 89 (and many Saab owners find the increased mileage from using 90+ makes it more economical than using a lower octane fuel).
Oct
26
comment Is there a trick for doing bleeding the lines by yourself?
I wouldn't recommend this. It is usually difficult to create any sort of tight seal between the hose and the bleeder, and doing it this way would suck in air if there was any leak.
Oct
24
comment Is there a trick for doing bleeding the lines by yourself?
@Mike, I sincerely hope that someone has bled your brakes in the past 10 years. If not, I strongly encourage you to consider changing your brake fluid more often. Brake fluid does absorb moisture over time, reducing it's boiling point and accelerating rust inside the system. I doubt you want to find yourself in a situation where your brakes are failing due to such an easily preventable issue like severe brake fade due to a lowered wet boiling point.
Oct
24
comment Is there a trick for doing bleeding the lines by yourself?
I was going to say in an answer, but forgot, make sure you look up the correct order in which to bleed your calipers. It can be different on every model, and it does matter.
Oct
24
comment Is there a trick for doing bleeding the lines by yourself?
~$50 on amazon. everyone has different values, but $50 is peanuts imho considering how easy it makes the job. I use mine many times a year (4 vehicles, I bleed each after winter at the least, and the last year it seems every car has needed major brake work so it's really seen some use lately). Spendy is when you need to buy an engine lift and a tranny jack for a DIY job ;-) And remember the $50 when (lol, I'd say if but ...) your helper doesn't quite hear you and lets up on the pedal while the valve is open and you have to start over.
Oct
24
comment Is there a trick for doing bleeding the lines by yourself?
There are several ways to perform a brake bleed by oneself that allow you to monitor the fluid exiting the bleeder valve for air bubbles.
Oct
24
comment Is there a trick for doing bleeding the lines by yourself?
maybe wait a tad longer than a couple hours to accept an answer...
Oct
13
comment Remote autostart suggestion
I just wanna throw out there that I have a Viper with this remote: viper.com/Images/items/Thumbnail/488V.jpg I curse the thing every day. Replacement remote, last I checked: $75 on EBay. I get about a year out of mine before they are completely hosed, but they start falling apart after only a couple months. I only get a year with solder and tape added.
Sep
2
comment Does a strut tower bar have any useful effect on chassis stiffness for a car with 100K miles?
Your strut tower brace makes an "amazing" amount of difference to your wife's commute to school with the kids? Really? (it's a rhetorical question, the notion seems absurd)
Aug
25
comment Is idling bad for your engine?
You aren't really giving any reasons why idling would be any worse than time spent driving. It's like saying "driving the car isn't good for the car"
Aug
15
comment Shocks and dampers - what can I do to prolong their life through home maintenance?
Also, "simple things I can do at home that don't require a hoist" - replacing your struts is one of those. Jack stand and less bolts than fingers on your hands.
Aug
15
comment Shocks and dampers - what can I do to prolong their life through home maintenance?
I'm not going to put this as an answer, because it's a vague remembrance and I could be mistaken - but back when I used to spend a lot of time on Subaru forums I could swear I remember this being a quite common issue, for STi shocks around that model year to go bad often.. something to do with being an inverted design iirc. Again, could be mis-remembering, but maybe a place to start research. You may have to go with an aftermarket strut to avoid the frequent replacements.