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Jun
8
comment How did the tyre shop flatten my battery?
Well, the battery appears to only be two years old (it has 03.2013 stamped on it), but certainly appears to be kaput. I'll get a new one this week...
Jun
8
comment When to change Timing belt - Peugeot 307 2003 1.6cc
It sounds like it needs changing then. Whether to change or to sell is down to your budget, and whether you are happy with the rest of the car. Changing it at an independent garage shouldn't cost much more than £300-400, most of which is labour... It's a perfectly DIY-able job, but not one I'd recommend if you don't have much experience of working on cars...
Jun
8
comment When to change Timing belt - Peugeot 307 2003 1.6cc
I removed the average cost part of the question as it's off-topic here, but the rest of your question is valid...
Jun
5
comment How did the tyre shop flatten my battery?
Good point, I've not checked the age, I'll have a look later...
Jun
5
comment How did the tyre shop flatten my battery?
Yeah, though there was no sign of any such issue beforehand...(It'd been sat unused from Sunday to Tuesday, and started on the button) It had only sat for a few minutes, but it's now sat for two days since, so I'll see if it still starts tonight...
Jun
5
comment How did the tyre shop flatten my battery?
They did so, before they told me about it...
Jun
5
comment Central Locking Help: Why are there 3 wires for each door lock?
possibly... It kind of depends on what the control unit does with those wires when you press the button on the remote...
Jun
3
comment New Pads, Rotor, & Caliper; Grinding, Squeaking, and Heat
The shim shouldn't be causing any problems, it's just there to stop the pads rattling. You MUST always change the pads on both sides of the car at the same time, otherwise you could end up with a dangerous mismatch between them - which might not be obvious in normal driving, until you have to do an emergency stop... Bad bearings should show up when you span the hub before refitting the new pads (hence why I asked that originally). In normal operation, the pads should appear to be touching the disc when you look at them, but you should be able to easily turn the wheel or hub by hand.
Jun
1
comment New Pads, Rotor, & Caliper; Grinding, Squeaking, and Heat
It's also worth checking the condition of the lines - see edit above...
May
29
comment Why are most engines made with even numbers of cylinders?
Passat, Golf, Bora(Jetta), and the SEAT Toledo, according to Wikipedia... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/V5_engine
May
29
comment Is there a trick to easily removing stuck rubber hoses off fittings?
That's definitely one of those "why didn't I think of that" ideas - especially for removing trim...
May
29
comment Why are most engines made with even numbers of cylinders?
Volkswagen made a V5 engine, with a very narrow angle of V - effectively locating the cylinders in a zig-zag formation...
May
28
comment Painting Racing Stripes
@Paulster2 - see edit...
May
20
comment Bent front fork on a bike
Personally, I'd steer well clear of it - if you know it has been in an accident and not repaired properly, what other damage might have been caused and missed? cracks in the frame etc...
May
14
comment Petrol vehicles, what are the advantages and disadvantages of a turbo charger?
@RoryAlsop Most UK market Diesels I can think of from the last 20 years have either been turbocharged or had a turbo option, except the smallest hatchbacks...
May
7
comment How to avoid having air bubbles in clutch line after cylinder replacement?
One trick I was once told - If the master and slave cylinders are both accessible from within the engine bay, attach a length of clear pipe to the slave cylinder bleed nipple, then stick the other side into the master cylinder reservoir, so that the fluid being bled out of the system goes straight back in, but without the air bubbles. Much less wastage... (Don't do this on brakes though, for safety reasons, and logical ones...)
May
1
comment Risks of “excess and lack” of Engine oil
If it is being burnt, it means the oil is getting past some of the seals, into the combustion chamber (cylinder). This means the seals are worn out. It's usually the valve stem seals that go first. Whether these can be replaced without dismantling the engine depends on the engine.
May
1
comment Risks of “excess and lack” of Engine oil
The oil sits in the engine sump, and is picked up by the pump, which forces it, under pressure, around the various moving parts of the engine, such as bearings and camshaft
May
1
comment Risks of “excess and lack” of Engine oil
The answer to "how long it will bear it without oil" is zero. The wear will start instantly - even in normal operation, the vast majority of the wear of an engine occurs in the couple of seconds it takes for the oil to start circulating properly.
Apr
1
comment Is it common for ECU's to maintain individual limit maps for each knock sensor?
The temperature profiles of each cylinder will be ever-so-slightly different too - the ones on the ends of each bank will have only one adjacent cylinder rather than two so will be a tiny bit cooler... They'd also be affected by differing coolant & lubricant paths and other items in the engine bay. I can't imagine it'd be a big enough difference to affect anything though - probably not even measurable with normal equipment!