dodgethesteamroller
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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 11 votes cast
Jun
7
awarded  Yearling
Jun
4
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
@Paulster2: The question asks whether it is safe to reuse just-changed oil, considering the cost, when performing a minor repair such as a valve cover R&R. Your recommendation of a blanket policy of "always throw away the oil regardless of the circumstances" is objectively a poor answer because it ignores one of the original poster's major concerns. I've flagged your answer because a rejection of the premises belongs in a comment on the question, not an answer.
Jun
4
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jun
4
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
What are you talking about? I quoted the original question. "My situation" has nothing to do with it.
Jun
4
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
@Paulster2: You obviously don't know what a "straw man" is. Also, there is no "elongated conversation" going on here. Comments are for clarification of questions and improvement of answers. The issue of whether erring on the side of throwing away an engineful of oil is a good practice could not be more relevant to the original question: I know it may sound cheap but I'd rather not throw away $25 worth of almost new oil.
Jun
3
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
Nice straw man. The OP said he was removing the valve covers. Obviously if you are planning to work on the bottom end then, yes, you have reason to suspect the oil is contaminated. That's not true in the general case.
Jun
3
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
@Paulster2: Really? Not even if it was brand new? I think that's extreme, not to mention wasteful. Conventional oil is a finite resource, and synthetic oil is pretty expensive ($5-$8/qt in the USA)--not that conventional is exactly cheap these days! Say you had just changed the oil in a car with an average-sized sump--5 quarts--and then, like the OP, decided you needed to do some work on the engine that would require draining the oil. If you'd literallly throw $20-$40 down the drain at this point to avoid reusing the oil, you have more cash to burn than most people.
Jun
3
comment Flushing built up Rust and Mineral Deposits in Cooling System
It's like any other preventive maintenance procedure--it's a matter of how long you want to keep the car, how much you want to spend, and the conditions under which it's driven. Hard water certainly plays a factor! An overworked cooling system shortens the life of the hoses and water pump, and can contribute to a prematurely leaking heater core (which is a bear of a job to replace on most cars). I don't know how well vinegar would work; I do know that citric acid is almost always specifically recommended to clean machinery exposed to untreated water such as dishwashers and boat engines.
Jun
3
comment Flushing built up Rust and Mineral Deposits in Cooling System
@RobertS.Barnes Yes, large amounts of oil in the cooling system do indicate a separate problem that needs addressing. Trace amounts of oil will get in and are no cause for concern, but they do interfere with the action of the acid. As for references, this is a factory-recommended regular maintenance procedure for Mercedes cars from the '50s through at least the '90s (hence why Mercedes sells the citric acid at their parts counters). Anecdotal evidence (such as it is) indicates that, as you'd expect, removing deposits increases coolant flow, making the engine run cooler at lower RPMs.
Jun
3
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
@Paulster2 Thanks for the correction. I guess I was thinking of the condensation that might cause water to collect in the airspace in an imperfectly sealed container--which, as you point out, doesn't actually mix with the oil, though it still could find its way into the engine easily by accident.
Jun
2
comment Should I replace a “blown” engine on my John Deere mower?
+1 for stripping down and rebuilding the engine. The parts will be readily available online for much less than the price of a short block. If it still doesn't work, you haven't lost much more than your time. A 10-year-old John Deere with a rebuilt engine is a lot more lawnmower than anything you can get new for $1,800. If not otherwise mistreated it should have a lot more life left in it.
Jun
2
revised Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
added 422 characters in body
Jun
2
revised Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
deleted 13 characters in body
Jun
2
answered Flushing built up Rust and Mineral Deposits in Cooling System
Jun
2
answered Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
May
18
comment Heavy Towing 2007 Chevy Avalanche 5.3L
@Paulster2 I know what the gross weight of the truck is. But to figure out your "everyday" weight or what the truck will weigh as a tow vehicle, manufacturer-quoted curb weight is more relevant than the GVWR, unless you plan to drive around with four people and a bed full of cargo all day long.
May
18
comment Heavy Towing 2007 Chevy Avalanche 5.3L
@Paulster2 Gross or curb weight? My 2004 Suburban 1500 which is virtually the same vehicle has a curb weight of 5300 lb. I don't usually tow full up on passengers and cargo, so the latter is probably more accurate than the GVWR.
Apr
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
15
revised Diesel engine starting / first start of the day problems
added 111 characters in body
Apr
14
answered A/C on older cars.