dodgethesteamroller
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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 17 votes cast
Sep
29
comment Why dual motor Tesla has more autonomy?
That is pure speculation, which my answer is not.
Sep
29
comment Why dual motor Tesla has more autonomy?
If you have an issue with being downvoted, take it up in chat. The text you cited is poorly written and ambiguous; you provide no explanation beyond the quote alone; the latter is in direct violation of SE quidelines for a good answer.
Sep
29
comment Why do tires get bigger over the years?
Possible duplicate: mechanics.stackexchange.com/questions/846/…
Sep
29
comment Running 4 tires of a slightly larger section height than stock/recommended
Recalibration of electronic traction control, ABS, the speedometer, and related systems for different tire sizes is done all the time in the off-roader community using aftermarket "programmers" like these made for full-size trucks by DiabloSport. Depending on the age and model of OP's vehicle there might be something compatible available.
Sep
29
comment Probably a stupid question: normal for lubricant to leak around edge of new tire?
I'd definitely go to the trouble of wiping the tire-mounting goop off for safety reasons if nothing else. It's pretty slippery stuff and you don't want it getting on your tread at the wrong moment and affecting traction.
Sep
29
answered Why dual motor Tesla has more autonomy?
Sep
29
comment Why dual motor Tesla has more autonomy?
The copy on the web page quoted is pretty bad. It seems to be conflating in the quote given the issues of why the all-wheel-drive Model S is more efficient than the rear-wheel-drive Model S, and why the AWD Model S is more efficient than conventional AWD ICE cars. OP is not asking about the latter.
Sep
22
comment where to buy the tool for this special hex nut?
I am surprised to hear that, as Toyota generally has available every possible part for my Lexus. Nevertheless, I was concerned mostly with the OP using fasteners of the correct grade (rather than the cheap stuff sold loose at neighborhood hardware stors). Any auto parts store should be able to supply metric nuts and bolts in standard sizes that are suitable for exhaust flanges.
Sep
22
comment where to buy the tool for this special hex nut?
I'd add that exhaust hardware is notorious for this. It's already damaged, so I would just go ahead and cut it off. Replace it with the correct part from the dealer, though, not just any old metric bolt and nut from the hardware store.
Sep
22
comment Will power-steering while stationary cause greater tire and steering wear?
And if your tie rod is going to snap off, much better it should do it while you're parked than moving!
Jun
7
awarded  Yearling
Jun
4
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
@Paulster2: The question asks whether it is safe to reuse just-changed oil, considering the cost, when performing a minor repair such as a valve cover R&R. Your recommendation of a blanket policy of "always throw away the oil regardless of the circumstances" is objectively a poor answer because it ignores one of the original poster's major concerns. I've flagged your answer because a rejection of the premises belongs in a comment on the question, not an answer.
Jun
4
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jun
4
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
What are you talking about? I quoted the original question. "My situation" has nothing to do with it.
Jun
4
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
@Paulster2: You obviously don't know what a "straw man" is. Also, there is no "elongated conversation" going on here. Comments are for clarification of questions and improvement of answers. The issue of whether erring on the side of throwing away an engineful of oil is a good practice could not be more relevant to the original question: I know it may sound cheap but I'd rather not throw away $25 worth of almost new oil.
Jun
3
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
Nice straw man. The OP said he was removing the valve covers. Obviously if you are planning to work on the bottom end then, yes, you have reason to suspect the oil is contaminated. That's not true in the general case.
Jun
3
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
@Paulster2: Really? Not even if it was brand new? I think that's extreme, not to mention wasteful. Conventional oil is a finite resource, and synthetic oil is pretty expensive ($5-$8/qt in the USA)--not that conventional is exactly cheap these days! Say you had just changed the oil in a car with an average-sized sump--5 quarts--and then, like the OP, decided you needed to do some work on the engine that would require draining the oil. If you'd literallly throw $20-$40 down the drain at this point to avoid reusing the oil, you have more cash to burn than most people.
Jun
3
comment Flushing built up Rust and Mineral Deposits in Cooling System
It's like any other preventive maintenance procedure--it's a matter of how long you want to keep the car, how much you want to spend, and the conditions under which it's driven. Hard water certainly plays a factor! An overworked cooling system shortens the life of the hoses and water pump, and can contribute to a prematurely leaking heater core (which is a bear of a job to replace on most cars). I don't know how well vinegar would work; I do know that citric acid is almost always specifically recommended to clean machinery exposed to untreated water such as dishwashers and boat engines.
Jun
3
comment Flushing built up Rust and Mineral Deposits in Cooling System
@RobertS.Barnes Yes, large amounts of oil in the cooling system do indicate a separate problem that needs addressing. Trace amounts of oil will get in and are no cause for concern, but they do interfere with the action of the acid. As for references, this is a factory-recommended regular maintenance procedure for Mercedes cars from the '50s through at least the '90s (hence why Mercedes sells the citric acid at their parts counters). Anecdotal evidence (such as it is) indicates that, as you'd expect, removing deposits increases coolant flow, making the engine run cooler at lower RPMs.
Jun
3
comment Is it safe to reuse oil that was drained for a repair?
@Paulster2 Thanks for the correction. I guess I was thinking of the condensation that might cause water to collect in the airspace in an imperfectly sealed container--which, as you point out, doesn't actually mix with the oil, though it still could find its way into the engine easily by accident.