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Jun
3
comment Do fast cars need to occasionally be driven fast?
Ah fascinating. Ok so it makes sense that an engine running at operating temperature is a happy engine - no need to fang it. Last point - how about the exhaust? Some cars have monstrous exhaust pipes (GT-R) to handle the exhaust from a 600 BHP+ engine, and my understanding of back pressure says that you'd get carbon buildup from driving well below the max power output. Would this be the one case where an Italian Tuneup is helpful?
Jun
2
comment Do fast cars need to occasionally be driven fast?
Ah right, so would that mean that harder driving doesn't require the radiator (fan) to work significantly harder?
Jun
2
comment Do fast cars need to occasionally be driven fast?
Interesting, nice to have an anecdote. And yes, I'm realising that there isn't substantial objective knowledge about this. That forum unsurprisingly includes people advocating spirited driving for engine maintenance, but again, the bias is heavy! I'll let this question hang for a bit longer to see if we get some more objective responses.
Jun
2
comment Do fast cars need to occasionally be driven fast?
Good answer. I guess the uncertainty lies around the "operating temperature". Yes you have the cooling system temp, though for a given cooling system temp my understanding is that you could have a significant range of temps of the engine internals. I think it's possible that the engineers could design an engine for which the proper operating temperature, for internal carbon buildup prevention, is actually quite hot due to "spirited driving". I'm still learning about mechanics, but would that be reasonable?
Jun
1
revised Do fast cars need to occasionally be driven fast?
Changes throughout
Jun
1
asked Do fast cars need to occasionally be driven fast?
May
24
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
13
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Dec
10
comment Engine power specification at different rpm?
Great explanation. Do you prefer the peaky curve even just for street driving, or is it mainly because you track your car?
Dec
5
accepted Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
Dec
4
accepted When is EBD (Electronic Brakeforce Distribution) beneficial?
Dec
4
revised Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
added 144 characters in body
Dec
4
comment Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
@BobCross Yep I hope I portrayed that by showing that µ isn't constant. Ok to try make it really clear, I mean a braking system which is overpowered. The pads and pistons and all that have more than sufficient force to slow down the wheels as much as they want - so much so that they could lock the wheels, but due to the use of ABS they don't lock the wheels, they instead grip at the threshold. I don't get why you're saying the cornering grip and braking grip is completely unrelated - didn't you read the "Traction Budget" from The Physics of Racing?
Dec
4
comment Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
@mac Exactly, that's what I wanted the answer to contain. Check out the answer I wrote up, do you think it's reasonable?
Dec
4
revised Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
Added equation about distance vs acceleration
Dec
4
answered Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
Dec
4
comment Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
@BobCross Not a problem if you don't agree with the edits, I'll just draft up something myself.
Dec
4
suggested rejected edit on Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
Dec
4
comment Assuming identical and sufficient ABS, and ignoring aerodynamics, are tires the only factor for braking distance?
@BobCross I did some more research, and Wikipedia (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tyre_load_sensitivity) and other sites (technicalf1explained.blogspot.com.au/2012/10/…) explain that the coefficient of friction decreases slightly as load increases. This explains everything in my mind - your experience of higher mass resulting in slightly worse braking, and even the nose dipping doing likewise. I'm going to draft some edits on your answer incorporation this, hopefully we can come to an agreement.
Dec
3
comment When is EBD (Electronic Brakeforce Distribution) beneficial?
So how come my car claims to have ABS but not EBD?