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9

The frame ground is needed. Although the engine is bolted to the frame all the connection points are isolated hence insulated by rubber. The reason for the rubber mounts is to isolate the engine vibration and the resulting stress from the frame. Some older vehicles did use a single ground to the block. This required a second ground wire from the block to the ...


6

When you buy a replacement battery cable they come with additional wires with crimp connectors on them for applications that require it. That way the aftermarket supplier can make one part number fit several vehicles. Take the picture below it fits vehicles that have a side post battery and need a 45 inch length. The extra wire may or may not be required ...


6

No, you don't have to rely on wire colors to figure out what's what. With nothing more than a decent multimeter and premix flame (blowtorch or gas stove), a two-test sequence can reveal the identity of each wire, assuming the O2 sensor is fully-functional: Determine the heater wires This should be done first. These wires serve to heat up the O2 sensor ...


5

You should maintain both ground wires. If you removed battery to chassis you would have to add engine to chassis wiring. The battery to engine wire is there to ground the alternator. Battery to chassis wiring is probably a safer, shorter, and easier run than engine to chassis anyways so why bother. You probably want 2gauge wire all the way around. You ...


5

If you place a jumper wire between a always-on 12V source and a switched 12V source, you've now turned your switched wire into an always-on wire (with power supplied from your original always-on source). This is not advisable, and is almost certainly not what you want. It could also create a risk of fire if the fuse for your unswitched source is too large ...


4

Your best bet appears to be the firewall pass-through behind the gas pedal. That should allow you to run behind the dash fairly directly.


4

http://www.wedophones.com/Manuals/Nissan/2003-Nissan-Xterra.pdf That should help ;) Not sure where you can find a universal wiring kit though. The aftermarket headunit should have a small diagram on it as well.


4

First off I can say that I have done something like this, but with the ignition and not the horn - my friends ignition switch broke so we wired a bright red push button directly from the battery (well - actually a fused 12v line inside the car) to the starter motor coil - it has since worked like a champ for nearly two years. First off - DO NOT wire ...


4

The yellow wire needs to be connected to +12 volts all the time (even with the car off), it sounds like you have this wire connected to switch power. This is the memory wire for the radio that allows it to retain settings when the car is off. I may be wrong on the color of the wire, I was basing my information on the manual provided by Phillips here (PDF ...


4

It certainly shouldn't hurt anything, but it is unlikely to help either as the wires to your starter should be appropriate anyway. If your wiring is old then you may see an improvement, otherwise I would suggest leaving it alone.


4

Start from the beginning. Check your battery. Then check your fried cables. Try to fix as much as possible. Make sure nothing is short-circuited. If all looks good, pull out the electric wiring diagram and identify all the items which prevents it from starting. Measure all these points and make sure there is no short/open circuits. The obvious would be: ...


4

Corrosion on the terminals is due to hydrogen gas being released from the acid in the battery. It mixes with other things in the atmosphere under the hood and produces the corrosion you see on the terminals. Generally, if the corrosion is occurring on the negative terminal, your system is probably undercharging. If on the positive side, it is probably ...


4

See if this picture helps you. Keep in mind most manufactures only use one main harness regardless of the accessories. So even if you don't have heated seats, or traction control the connectors and the harness are already there. Also here is the pin-out for the traction control switch Look on the inside of the drivers door for a label that looks like ...


3

Just add more ground/earth cables, wherever you can. Shorter the better too. Ive added a larger battery to chassis, battery to block and everywhere that makes sense/is out of site, ive added in more chassis to block cables etc... Every bit extra helps.


3

The headlight wiring is protected from being overheated (a short,overcurrent) by a circuit breaker. It operates like a circuit breaker in your house except it has an auto reset feature. The clicking you hear may be the circuit breaker resetting. With your admitted limited knowledge this is a job for a pro.


3

This is almost certainly one of the door 'pin switches' out of adjustment. Try making up a pad of some sort where the door shuts onto the switches. I have used stick on wheel weights quite effectively for this!.


3

Check for a shorted wire. If the fuse keeps blowing, you could have a wire touching metal somewhere in the system.


3

You can also get source sensing amplifiers, which will further make this simpler. If they detect signal from your smartphone, they'll turn on, if not, it'll turn off after some amount of delay. The next question is whether or not you can (or would want to) hook your smartphone or other source directly to an amplifier. It might work, it might not. There ...


3

What you need is a simple switch. Here's an example of one that you can order from DigiKey. Your radio will use two wires for powering itself, the ground (GND) and V+. The ground wire should be grounded, that is connected to negative (-) terminal of the battery. The V+ wire should be connected to one connector of the switch. Battery positive terminal (+) ...


3

Typically car stereos do require a constant voltage source in order to keep settings - they may have a supercap which keeps settings for a short while (for changing batteries over etc), but over time this may degrade, and in any case is only designed to last for a few minutes. In order to do this you usually have an unswitched power wire directly from the ...


3

So you want to keep the factory amp? I wouldn't suggest that. I'd recommend getting rid of the factory amp altogether, they're usually not the best, and it would be difficult - if not impossible - for them to work together. I google'd for a quick sanity check and I'll post a snippet from WikiAnswers: I wouldn't...first most after market amps require a ...


3

Yes, these two wires should be connected together. This is what allows the radio to retract the antenna when it isn't being used. Just because your wiring harness has a connection for this wire, it doesn't necessarily mean that your car has this kind of motorized antenna. Even if that's the case, there's still no harm in making the connection.


3

I took my car to a different VW shop (not the dealership) and they fixed the problem for $160, but if I'd known the solution was just to solder the wires directly together, I could have fixed it myself. I did however, learn what the problem was thanks to them and I'll share the solution here. VW apparently knows about this issue and supposedly offers special ...


3

OK, so we figured it out. When i was trying to connect the car to a computer. The computer did not start. A fuse was burned. What i did wrong in the first place ? In the radio there was a blue "power antena" wire, And from the car radio unit there was a blue wire "Source control power", i connected them (i thought blue goes to blue) - well i was wrong. ...


3

You could use electrical tape to accomplish this, but the better way to do it would be to individually replace the broken wire portions using lengths of wire, solder, and heat shrink. This would be the safer, longer lasting solution. It's a lot of work, but well worth it in the end. The only issue would be the color coding of the wire, though black heat ...


2

When you install a new connector, coat the exposed metal surfaces with dielectric silicone grease. This will keep out moisture and slow corrosion. You can also just squirt the stuff in to the connector. It might be messy, but things will still work fine.


2

For a preliminary inspection, I would arm the alarm, then walk around and pull on each door. If it doesn't go off, then you're probably looking at wiring. Bang on the metal of each door and see if you can make the light come on. Tug in the harness under the dash and the lower side kick panels in front of the doors and under the dash. The two most common ...


2

If this is only happening when the vehicle is in motion, I'd visually trace the wiring and look for a point where a wire or wire bundle is rubbing on something and has worn through the insulation. If it doesn't exhibit the problem when it's parked, it's going to be hard to track down with a multimeter or test light. Unless you can reproduce it by gently ...


2

Many amplifiers have low-level inputs using RCA style connections. You can use one of those with a RCA to 1/8" stereo jack for your phone. Switching it could be accomplished through a switch like you mentioned or hopefully there's an ignition-only wire that can be used on the amplifier. They typically have an ignition input just used to switch the power.


2

Cycling HID lamps the way you propose will reduce the lifespan of the bulbs, they aren't made to be turned back on shortly after being turned off. Also, I'm having trouble making sense of your schematic - the oval labeled "LIGHTS" - is that supposed to represent the ballast? I don't know that I'd power that directly from your H4, seems like I'd want a new ...



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