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8

I second Gabriel's comment: Probably cost. Nickel Moly Chromium Stainless (316) is very expensive, this random kitchen sink is just a sheet of stainless stamped into a cube, and it's $500+ retail. Given the price I have to assume it's 316, otherwise it would be even more. I can only imagine what a single wheel would cost a manufacturer. Even using Powdered ...


8

Largely because it's unnecessary. Steel wheels are so incredibly cheap compared to stainless that there's no benefit. Steel wheels are heavy enough that it takes way beyond the normal life of a car for them to rust out too (I have a 22 year old car that I drive in the winters on original steel wheels and the wheels are in better shape than the car body). ...


7

Winter tyres are absolutely necessary when the temperatures fall below 4 degrees Celsius, even if there is no snow on the road itself. Cold roads are slippery as well, even with tiny amount of humidity. Summer tyres have significantly worse traction in cold weather, and the car steers like a curling stone -- that is, not at all. Sharp corners and moderate to ...


7

Regular washing and waxing is your best bet. We kept our cars in one piece through the Rochester, NY winters with nothing more than this. The wax provides a sacrificial protective coating for the painted parts of the body. You can apply wax to your wheels as well. As a bonus, the brake dust will be easier to wash off of a waxed wheel. Then wash, wash, ...


7

tl;dr: Cold dry air has a substantial effect on horsepower. This can be confirmed through experimentation on any modern car. I can think of two scientific reasons as to why this may be: Increased air density Decreased humidity Yes and yes. You're already most of the way there. Let's take a quick trip to simplified theoretical model ...


6

I plowed with a Chevy 1500 and a Ford F250. You could definitely feel the weight of the plow more on the smaller 1500 compared to the F250. The 1500 would squat quite a bit when the plow was lifted. The plow (a Western brand) was professionally installed on both trucks, and the only issues we ever had were electrical with the plow controls, the same kind of ...


6

The recommendations given on the travel site hit most of the high points. As someone who grew up in snowy Western New York and had the opportunity to drive all manner of vehicles in the snow, I can say without a doubt that the single best preparation to the vehicle is to fit good snow tires. Secondly, decrease your speed in snowy/freezing/wet conditions, ...


6

Wash off the salt whenever possible. Inspect the car regularly (especially in locations where salt and water can get trapped). Repair any noticable damage immediately (damaged paint, damaged undercoating, etc). Set aside some spare funds in the anticipation of such repairs. My experience is that body panels don't rust, it's the strut towers, floor, and ...


6

Install snow tires. If it's 4-wheel drive or front wheel drive, install on all four wheels; if rear-wheel drive, just the driving wheels, although all four would be best. You might get away with summer tires + chains, but they have to be propely fitted and legal for where you intend to use them (check local regulations). If temperatures are no more than a ...


6

The new tyres would indeed be narrower and slightly taller - the first number is the width in mm, so the second tyre is 10mm (3/8") narrower than the first, and the second is the height as a percentage of the width, which works out at roughly 96mm and 103mm respectively. Just to mix things up even more, the third number is the wheel diameter in inches... ...


6

I would agreee with the articles - waiting a minute or so (generally the time it takes to clear the ice off the windows...) is generally fine. As the other answers say, the engine will idle high to start with, as the ECU compensates for the colder block and thicker oil by running the engine richer. This will cause more wear to the engine, as the oil is ...


5

I live in New England. It can snow anytime from Haloween until April 1st. Depending on the year we can get five or twenty-five significant storms a year. Most of the winter the average daytime temp is in the twenties, but can easily hit forty for a few days. Most roads are bare two days after a storm. Everyone I know that does use winter specific tires put ...


5

I posted a piece on Being Prepared in the snow on my personal blog a couple of years back. I didn't think of the Carbon Monoxide problem @mac mentioned, but there are some useful snippets there: With this winter in Scotland already a repeat of the freezing conditions of last year we are still astonished at how many people leave themselves at risk by being ...


5

This shall be a lesson to you about winterizing your bike. Let's take it from the top. Drain that nasty ancient gas out of the tank AND out of the carburetor bowl(s). You want it completely gone, all of it. If you're lucky, you'll be able to use "carburetor & fuel injector cleaner" (the fuel additive, NOT the spray) to clean any new varnish out of the ...


4

As@ mac has stated a plow will fit and the truck will push snow. The primary considerations are how often and how long are you going to plow. The longer and more frequently you plow the more the suspension and driveline parts will be stressed. If you are just doing a few driveways you should have no problems. If you plan to plow commercially for long ...


4

Yes, the rubber has been compromized by ozone in the air and ultraviolet light even if stored indoors.That is why you will often see RV's with covers over the tires to extend the life of the tire.Strategic Safety reccomends useful life is 10 years from manufactureSome European manufacturers reccomnd six years on performance tires.Typically when these tires ...


4

Here's a diagram. It shows two batteries connected to each other and wires from each battery going to each respective car. What the diagram doesn't show is that those wires, "To Starter" --> "Ground" form a loop as well, and if you picture that, you will see that the path forms a full circle. To be slightly more precise, the path forms two circles, like ...


4

One other thing to keep in mind when letting a car warm up. You're only warming up the engine. Remember all the other components that stay cold until driven: rear end, shocks, suspension components, tires, etc. So even if you let a car warm up until the engine is closer to operating temperature, you should still drive easy at first, until all components ...


4

The wheel bolt pattern is different between the 2011 Outback and the 2013 Highlander (5-100 vs. 5-114), so if your old snow tires are mounted on wheels, you cannot use those wheels on the Highlander. Furthermore, the overall diameter of the wheels and tires is considerably larger on the new car (245/55 R19 is approximately 29.6in in diameter, 93in in ...


3

I believe that you can do that, but you're probably better off buying a properly formulated anti-rust product such as 'Waxoil' or similar. These can either be sprayed or brushed onto the underside of the car depending on the product in question.


3

If you're getting enough moisture into the seal/door interface, the seals are already failing. It's time to replace them. However, if you want to hold it off for a little while, vaseline is fine. It'll slowly degrade the seals further, but well, they're already done for at this point... Best thing to do is to use silicone lube on the seals occasionally ...


3

My biggest concern would be the weight of the vehicle and the overconfidence that a 4x4 causes. It's real easy to overestimate the available traction in a 4x4. Starting out from a stop seems so easy that it's real easy to forget that normal braking is typically harder than normal acceleration. You may well be right on the edge on acceleration, and then ...


2

Most newer vehicles don't come with block heaters installed, so unless you've had one installed it's fairly likely that there is no block heater if you can't find a cord. Alternatively, you could examine the oil pan for a missing cord. If you purchased the car used the previous owner may have had one installed and broke or lost the cord. I had a 2001 Saturn ...


2

Essentially, you want to displace the potential condensation that will form after the air inside a warm car cools down. The best suggestion that I have heard is silicone based grease or sprays. Those will discourage the water from sticking around and, later, becoming ice. Anything that might react with rubber is definitely not recommended. This includes ...


2

DXM's answer hits all the important points in great detail. To give you a quick answer to your specific questions at the end, though: So what's actually happening when you start the dead car? Is it drawing power from the good batter to start the car? Remember, the live car is running. Its alternator is being driven by a functioning engine. When ...


2

Some of what your friends have told you is nonsense. You will possibly have less chance of getting stuck in the winter in a RWD car, as RWD gives you more grip when trying to accelerate forwards (as weight moves rearward). Whenever I have had to rescue friends in FWD cars, I usually need to use reverse to get grip. Additional set of winter tyres? Nope - ...


2

I think it depends on how bad the rust patches are. If it's just surface rust, I'd clean up the rust with a wire brush and some sand paper and treat the remaining rust with chemical rust remover or converter, then repaint the wheel. If there is significantly deep rust on the rim that goes deep enough to warrant grinding out, I'd be a bit careful or would ...


2

One suggestion I would have is to allow your car to warm up before driving. Modern cars are eons better at this, but nothing short of a wreck is harder on a car than being driven when the engine's oil isn't up to temperature (and bearing clearances are off, etc.). How long is up for debate. I believe the general consensus is at least a couple minutes. ...


2

I grew up in Finland, where winters are long and icy. Mostly drove RWD cars, but also, at times, owned FWD and AWD ones. If you look at all the nordic/scandinavian rally champions, they preferred front wheel drive, until the Audi Quattro changed rallying forever. But that is assuming you are a professional rally driver... :) There is no clear answer - ...


2

The defrost setting (left most position on the right knob) should cycle the a/c and blow dried air onto the windshield. The a/c should dehumidify the air the result of which is less fog. The recirc function you are looking for is the two right most switch positions. This is not the selections you want for defogging. The humidity in the cabin will not be ...



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