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2

It is necessary that you get your vehicle aligned when doing any of the following: Any suspension work which might involve geometry (ie: bushings, ball joints, steering linkage, rack & pinion, etc.) Strut replacement Change of rims to different sizes (ie: non-standard, wider, taller, etc.) If the vehicle is pulling (see NOTE #1 below) to one side or ...


5

There are several issues to consider here. In the first place, there is the question of transmission from the engine/gearbox to the wheels. Most vehicles are designed so that driven wheels run at the same speed, so need to be precisely the same diameter. Otherwise, differentials need to work continuously to compensate for the difference in wheel rotation ...


1

It's already well answered here but typically you torque items "under load". Since torque values specify a clamping force you want to be sure that the conditions of the part are most like the "real world" when you set the torque. When I do tires I center the tire and snug down all lugs before putting load back on the suspension and then torquing the lugs. ...


3

Offset is one of a number of measurements applicable to a road wheel and it describes the distance from the centre line of the wheel which the mounting face of the hub is. As a practical example, lets consider a 6J wheel (a wheel which is 6 inches wide). Offset is usually quoted as "ET" followed by an optional mathematical sign (+/-) and a number. A wheel ...


1

The lower ride height does have a lot of advantages aside from appearance. For one, the lower a car is, the more aerodynamic it is. Another thing that's great about a lower car is that because you need stiffer springs to compensate for the smaller amount of travel they can do over bumps, your car is kept more level when you go around corners. This minimizes ...


0

I'm not convinced its ok. The total toe is within spec but the toe on one side is out of spec, this would mean that the wheel may well scrub on one edge faster than the rest. The idea of it being acceptable at 0.44 is that its a total of 0.22 on both sides. The front left is 0.37 out which is out of spec. I would normally bring it back to within spec.


3

No, total toe is what matters, as long as your steering wheel is straight when you are riding down the road. Basically when those readings were taken the steering wheel may not have been pointing straight ahead. If the tech didn't still have the steering wheel locked down and the steering wheel turned slightly it would cause those readings. Another possible ...



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