New answers tagged

3

If you have 16.5" diameter rims, and wish to retain them, then you must match the exact inner rim diameter with replacement tires. Never attempt to "get by" with a 16" or 17" tire on a 16.5 rims. Similar things were attempted for a very short while when metric diameter wheels were brought briefly to the US, and then stocks of tires vanished with the ill-...


0

Your friend may also be referring to the tire being too wide for the wheel. In this case the normally flat surface is forced to curve in order for the side walls to fit into a narrower space. As Paulster stated, there are a great many variables that come into play, but the basic idea is that a larger contact patch with the same tire compound and the same ...


7

IMO, it is not I'm considering 3 types of rim. Carbon Fiber Billet Forged Aluminum Alloy Cast Aluminum Alloy All three material types do not lend themselves to flexibility. The brittle nature of the material would crack, perhaps not even visibly. But, I have to be honest here I have straightened cast motorcycle wheels using a small jack and a ...


1

I know this doesn't relate to the reassembly process, that's been covered in the other answer by Paul. However most of the time, the rear sprocket is not physically attached to the wheel. They are two separate pieces which have rubber inserts between the metal "teeth". The rubber inserts are there for dampening torque from the motor if you let the clutch out ...


12

Fixing a bent motorcycle wheel is situational. If you are on a 125 to 200cc motorcycle using it for commuting purpose and will be driving under the speed limit, I would not be worried and its absolutely fine to reuse a bent wheel. provided the bend was minimal , if its extensive then changing would be a wiser option. If you are on a 600 to 1000cc super ...


2

looking at tire rack. Searched by rim (wheel) size. Came up with 3 results. 8.75R16.5 9.5R16.5 37x12.5R16.5 The 9.5R16.5 looks somewhat close in size at 30.6x9.5. http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Firestone&tireModel=Transforce+HT&partnum=950R65THT&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes


2

It seems to me like something is scraping or rubbing on the brake disc. Is there any chance the emergency brake is slightly engaged? I would suggest jacking the wheels of the ground and spinning them to see if you can pinpoint the sound. It may be something stuck next to the brake pad (which wouldn't necessarily get louder when the brakes are applied), or ...


0

I would be more likely to use an anti-sieze type of grease on studs or bolts that are more prone to rust. I think that the conical mating surfaces of the nut / wheel provide the friction to keep the nuts tight, so lubricated threads helps to preserve the threads with repeated removal, installation and re-torque of the nuts.


10

Do exactly what the manufacturer of the vehicle states in service information. Why do I say this? The nut rotational friction and bolt clamping force are both affected by the choice of lubricant used or lack thereof. Almost all OEM's specify no lube. This is done for several reasons. Dry results in the most thread rotational friction, a most desirable ...


2

To answer the original question, there is no value in an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) tire pressure recommendation, if you are not using OEM recommended wheels and tire sizes. It's that simple. The ONE really important "recommendation" is that you should never exceed the maximum rated sidewall pressure cold.


6

tl;dr: it depends. Usually bigger wheels + thinner tires = higher pressure. So, should one keep the pressure to what's recommended by the manufacturer regardless of the tire dimensions? Sort of. If the manufacturer has a recommendation for your wheel and tire dimensions, you should definitely start with those. If your new wheels are bigger (and the ...


13

In almost all circumstances you should use the manufacturer's numbers as your guide. They are aware of the requirements of their wheels, and they do understand that a low profile requires a certain pressure to resist damage. This doesn't necessarily need to be a higher pressure (although it sometimes is) because the wheel construction also needs to be ...



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