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0

If you live in a place where the roads are smooth, you are less likely to ever fell the difference. In the other hand, lower profile improves handling, so if you like a more sporty drive (which I highly disrecommend in a SUV) you will find yourself better in the SE.


0

See if your shock is still in a good condition. Push or jump on each side of the vehicle whichever way you can do it and see how long it takes for car to stop moving. Good shocks would stop the movement in one 1.5 compressions. Bad shocks 2 or more. Might be the wheel bouncing because of bad shock and with that all other issues with your suspension getting ...


8

Ferrari and Borrani According to the Borrani Wikipedia page: Between 1946 and 1966, all Ferrari cars were equipped with Borrani wheels as original equipment. Looking for Ferrari cars built during these years should be a good starting point to answer your question. Moreover, Borrani also supplied wire wheels to Lamborghini, Maserati and Alfa Rome, ...


2

I have had alloy wheels in extreme cold time of winter, and the ice build up causes the wheels to become unbalanced. I don't know if this is because of the type of metal the wheel is, or the light weight of alloy. I now have steel wheels for my winter tires and alloy for summer. I suspect the unbalance comes from the light weight of alloy, but maybe alloy ...


3

Rims are heavier than tires. The heaviest part of the rim is the part directly under the tire that stretches the entire width. By having a larger rim, this is moved further out, so it has to move faster. Larger rims typically provide worse straight acceleration and braking due to the increased weight. If you are changing steel rims to aluminum, you ...


1

Another factor is that if you go for wheels which are significantly larger than stock and use low profile tyres to keep the overall tyre diameter the same this can have an adverse effect on ride and handling as the flex of the sidewall can be an important contribution to the dynamic characteristic of the suspension. Similarly retail cas alloy wheels are ...


5

In addition to the correct metrics pointed out by Nick C, also consider that 14" rims are not your only choice. Many people choose aftermarket wheels because they want the look of a bigger rim, like a 15" or 16" and lower profile tires. When talking to people in a tire shop, these are known as +1 and +2 sizes. The rim diameter goes up, and the sidewall ...


8

You'll need to know the diameter (in inches) and width (also in inches, often written with a J - so 4J x 14 would be a 4" x 14" wheel), the PCD (pitch circle diameter, or bolt pattern), which is stated as NxM, where N is the number of bolts and M is the diameter in mm of a circle going through them all, e.g. 4x100, the centre bore (the size of the hole in ...


0

I'd take it to a different garage if you don't trust the first one - and I wouldn't pay more than ~£5/wheel for balancing - but then I'd also never go to a garage that charged extra for it, the vast majority include it in the cost of fitting the new tyres. (I also refuse to go anywhere near one garage local to me after they charged me £2 extra for Nitrogen ...


8

One "at home" option is to use a manual wheel balancer like this model: These are normally used for people that want to balance their own trailer tires or for off-road vehicles, but in many cases you can do a good enough job to balance a car tire with one. Of course, once you pay $70-$90 USD for the device and buy a set of wheel weights and take the time ...


-2

No, you need a machine to balance wheels. If a wheel weight is off even a fraction of an inch it can throw off wheel balance. What you can do is rotate the tires and see if your problem moves to the rear.


1

I suspect you'll have to take that to a shop - I had a very similar set of locks on a car before, I tried using a remover set like the one in Ben's answer, but it didn't get anywhere - the outer chromed ring split in two circumferentially and just span - the tyre shop used a special single-use tool that was hammered into the keyhole and deformed to fit.


5

You can use a wheel lock removing set. I believe most automotive stores will sell them. They can also easily be found online. Or you can drill the nut and stud. Which takes a long time. It would be faster & cheaper to pay a mechanic for a half hour labor to remove your wheel locks.



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