New answers tagged

3

These would appear to be "McGard 8-spline" lugs. I don't have direct experience with them, but they appear to come in two sizes: Image from BrandSport Auto Accessories. Never used them, but they had a good diagram. These lugs are commonly called "spline" or "tuner" lugs. They are sold to look sporty (because they are different and cool), provide ...


1

If it's tight'ish it'll probably be fine.. However make sure the other four nuts are torqued up properly! Also make sure that the looser nut &stud can NOT be undone, as you don't want one of those things flying through somebody else's windscreen I would advise that you get it replaced as soon as you can. If the nut just spins it's likely the splines that ...


2

I suggest you bring your vehicle to your local garage to double check your torque specs for your wheel lugs. They probably will not charge you for this; since it takes only five minutes. It is especially important to get this checked if your driving the car on a road trip.


4

It'll be good enough to drive to the nearest tire shop, and ask them to sort it. Shouldn't be expensive/time consuming


5

No one is going to tell that driving with a missing lug nut for huge distances at highway speeds is a good idea. If the question was "can I drive to the shop like this", you might get some people to capitulate, but you're talking about a cross-country journey. I doubt you car would pass a safety inspection without all the lugs, so you shouldn't take a huge ...


2

Tire balance is a good place to start. Also, the U-joints may need to be lubricated or replaced. Slide underneath the car and check for loose driveline components. Usually a vibration upon acceleration indicates a driveline issue. If it's a FWD lancer, you may need to check or replace the differential fluid, and visually inspect the front driveshafts.


4

Getting the wheels balanced won't hurt. They are the typical culprit of a shaking steering wheel. Many tire places will even balance them for free. It would also be worthwhile to jack up the front of your car and check to see if you have any play in your control arms or in the tie rods, or if the boots are badly worn. I had a problem with a shaking steering ...


0

Empty and change your diff fluid, gearbox fluid and transfer case fluid. When the fluids are out and in the pan, run a magnet through each to see if you can collect any metal pieces. Being an evo, I'd be suspecting either diff or transfer case as the first thing to look at. When the teeth in the gears and clutch packs inside the diffs start to fail, they ...


6

If you are talking about these, they are there to indicate the torque or the bolt has not loosened any. They are just an easy visual sign the lugs have not loosened any. Part of the way down on this page which reviews lug nut torque indicators, it says: To assist with making sure that there are no loose lug nuts on a truck which can give rise to ...


1

Are they directional tires? The one with arrow on the sidewall indicating the direction of rotation like with some brands of snow tires. If they are not installed with the arrows facing toward the front they would act as you describe. At slow speeds they would throw you side to side and be very hard to drive.


1

That ring is a spigot ring used when the center bore of your wheel is greater than the size of the hub wheel mounting, spacers are usually metal and either have holes with bolts that screw into the hub or holes that line up with your stud pattern to go through the wheels, then through the spacers and then into the hub. as for the "wobbly steering wheel" ...


2

The black plastic part you see surrounding the dust cap in the centre is simply a spigot ring that is used to finely adjust the centre bore of the alloy wheel. If you measure the diameter of the lip that the spigot ring is sat on and the diameter of the centre hole in your wheel there will likely be a small difference that is taken up by the ring. If your ...


1

If you prefer the bigger wheels and you cannot feel a negative difference I'd plump for them otherwise I'd probably regret it every time I saw the car (except when purchasing new tyres!). I used to be into customised cars a lot when I was younger and used to put big wheels on all my cars, I felt at the time that the styling and cornering grip outweighed ...


0

Steel rims are cheaper to replace than alloy wheels. Alloy wheels tend get damaged by the salt and can develop air leaks around the tire beads. Steel rims you can paint with tremclad type of paint to deal with the rust prior to mounting tires. Steel rims are also full rims which help protect the brakes from ice,snow and salt. Alloy rims don't offer the same ...


1

If you live in a place where the roads are smooth, you are less likely to ever feel the difference. On the other hand, lower profile improves handling, so if you like a more sporty drive (which I highly disrecommend in an SUV) you will find yourself better in the SE.



Top 50 recent answers are included