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18

My wife had a similar problem on her car and it turned out the problem was the wheel, not the tire. We'd had enough sand and salt on the road this winter that she had corrosion / gunk building up right at the bead. The tire shop dismounted the tires, cleaned up the seating area on the wheel and then remounted the tire. The problem now seems to be solved.


18

I had a similar problem with my car a while back. The trick I used was as follows. Loosen the nuts right off, but don't remove them (leaving three or four threads on), so they restrain the wheel when it comes free. Jack the car up and support it solidly on stands - I also put the spare wheel under the sill on the side I am working on. Take a 2-3lb club ...


13

It's always been my understanding that it eliminates the water vapor making the heat have less and more predictable effect on tire pressure. Unless you are driving a race car or an airplane I don't think it's worth the trouble IMO I found some more information I have listed and sourced below It's not about the nitrogen. It's about reducing oxygen, ...


13

In almost all circumstances you should use the manufacturer's numbers as your guide. They are aware of the requirements of their wheels, and they do understand that a low profile requires a certain pressure to resist damage. This doesn't necessarily need to be a higher pressure (although it sometimes is) because the wheel construction also needs to be ...


13

Nitrogen is inert and doesn't affect rubber or the steel rim. Carbon dioxide is highly reactive and affects both the rubber by causing swelling in the rubber. It also would cause corrosion in iron based rims (particularly Carbon- Steel). Edit: When CO2 is mixed with moisture becomes Carbolic acid which is corrosive. It all depends on concentration. It is ...


12

The short answer is probably not, but you are creating undue hardship on the internals that will likely lead them to fail earlier than they would otherwise. When you drive your car, you are putting wear and tear on basically everything. Driving your car harder (accelerating quickly, stopping abruptly) just adds to the wear you are putting on it. Even just ...


12

Fixing a bent motorcycle wheel is situational. If you are on a 125 to 200cc motorcycle using it for commuting purpose and will be driving under the speed limit, I would not be worried and its absolutely fine to reuse a bent wheel. provided the bend was minimal , if its extensive then changing would be a wiser option. If you are on a 600 to 1000cc super ...


11

Naturally, the number of pros that I have available to ask is limited so I'm wondering what a wider audience will say. The nice thing about a question like this is that it isn't up for opinions. The cost / benefit ratios can be measured. Grassroots Motorsports routinely does this sort of analysis. For example, in Speed Holes by Per Schroeder (from ...


11

There are major benefits on a track: you have much lower tire deformation with a low profile tire so you can corner harder. You can also accelerate and brake harder, and your tires get to temperature much faster as there is less rubber to warm up. On a normal road having very low profile tires can be a negative - they don't soak up bumps as well as a higher ...


11

From what I have seen and read over the last few years the "general rule" has become best tires on the rear. In my opinion it is likely the result of litigation by people who were involved in skidding accidents. The theory as far as I understand it, is that with worn tires in the rear, the back end can loose traction and allow the rear of the car to attempt ...


11

There are tools available that can do the job without using a press: There are many more. The overall theme is the C-clamp like stile of pressing the bearing in and out. There is an old saying, there is a right tool for the job. These or a press is the right tool. There are other ways but you always run the risk of damaging the bearing, knuckle or both.


11

The power losses in a MT are primarily do to friction. Everything in a MT is positively locked together, meaning there is no slip anywhere. Beyond friction at least one of the rotating assemblies is partially submerged in the gear lube to provide splash lube for everything else. Stirring the fluid looses power. In an automatic everything I just mentioned ...


10

Most lug nuts should be torqued between 75-100 ft-lbs. So applying the appropriate amount of body weight (lean into it really good) should be adequate until you get to somewhere with a proper torque wrench. One thing to note, is that you should always tighten the lug nuts in a star pattern so that you do not damage anything.


10

I second Gabriel's comment: Probably cost. Nickel Moly Chromium Stainless (316) is very expensive, this random kitchen sink is just a sheet of stainless stamped into a cube, and it's $500+ retail. Given the price I have to assume it's 316, otherwise it would be even more. I can only imagine what a single wheel would cost a manufacturer. Even using Powdered ...


10

Much of what makes wheels appear dirty is brake dust. Brake dust is wear particles from the brake pads and rotors (or from linings and drums, in the case of drum brakes). The braking effort in most vehicles is not equally distributed between front and rear wheels--this is by design. Generally the front wheels do most of the braking work, since weight ...


10

You have severe case of corrosion. The part is called the lower control arm. Its function is to maintain the tire in the correct position. Do not attempt to drive the vehicle. In the best case scenario you will cause more damage, the tire could hit the fender, the axle could separate or you can bend something else. In the worst case you kill someone when ...


10

Do exactly what the manufacturer of the vehicle states in service information. Why do I say this? The nut rotational friction and bolt clamping force are both affected by the choice of lubricant used or lack thereof. Almost all OEM's specify no lube. This is done for several reasons. Dry results in the most thread rotational friction, a most desirable ...


10

Nitrogen makes up around 80% of Air - therefore its more readily reclaimed and separated than the smaller amounts of other gases in air. I.e. the process for reclaiming nitrogen from air could be less efficient than that of reclaiming CO2 from air and still be cost effective. Additionally its stability at higher temperatures means its behaves more ...


9

As pointed out by DXM, the 15,16,17 isn't an interchangeable number. None of the first 3 numbers can just be changed individually. With your 205/55R16 example: 205 is the width of the tire in millimeters 55 is the percentage of the width that equals the height of the sidewall (so 205 x .55 = 112.75mm) 16 is the wheel diameter in inches the tire fits on ...


9

Nope, doing it with the wheels on the ground if fine, no need to lift the weight of the wheels. It's easier that way because the wheels can't turn while you are torquing the lugs.


9

I think you threw a wheel weight. Let's consider this quote from the great Wikipedia: When the wheel rotates, asymmetries of mass may cause it to hop or wobble, which can cause ride disturbances, usually vertical and lateral vibrations. It can also result in a wobbling of the steering wheel or of the entire vehicle. The ride disturbance, due to ...


9

There is one other figure you need to take into consideration; offset. The offset is the measure of how far pushed out or in the centre point of the wheel (that bolts to the hub) is when compared to the centre of the wheel (between where the beads of the tyre sit). If the offset is wrong, you can find that the wheels can foul your suspension, brakes or ...


8

In an ideal world where time plays no issue you would torque all the lug nuts to 1/3 of the reccomended torque in a crisscross pattern. Reset the torque wrench to 2/3 of the torque spec and tighten again in a crisscross pattern. Finally set the wrench to 100% of the torque spec and do the final tightening. After 50 miles recheck the lugs with the wrench set ...


8

The simplest thing to do is to phone the dealership, ask them to give you the part number for the wheel bearing, and then do a google search for that part number, or go to your favourite online shop and enter the part number into the search box. Part numbers are unique to a particular car or range of cars.


8

Largely because it's unnecessary. Steel wheels are so incredibly cheap compared to stainless that there's no benefit. Steel wheels are heavy enough that it takes way beyond the normal life of a car for them to rust out too (I have a 22 year old car that I drive in the winters on original steel wheels and the wheels are in better shape than the car body). ...


8

I've worked at a garage. We use a rubber mallet. Hit it like your doing lug nuts. Hit it, rotate 90*, hit it, rotate 45*, and so on so you are not always hitting on the same spot. We would normally put some grease on the hubs. You can use anti-seize also. I wouldn't worry about water moving it around. It is squished flat in there, and water and ...


8

One "at home" option is to use a manual wheel balancer like this model: These are normally used for people that want to balance their own trailer tires or for off-road vehicles, but in many cases you can do a good enough job to balance a car tire with one. Of course, once you pay $70-$90 USD for the device and buy a set of wheel weights and take the time ...


8

You'll need to know the diameter (in inches) and width (also in inches, often written with a J - so 4J x 14 would be a 4" x 14" wheel), the PCD (pitch circle diameter, or bolt pattern), which is stated as NxM, where N is the number of bolts and M is the diameter in mm of a circle going through them all, e.g. 4x100, the centre bore (the size of the hole in ...


8

Ferrari and Borrani According to the Borrani Wikipedia page: Between 1946 and 1966, all Ferrari cars were equipped with Borrani wheels as original equipment. Looking for Ferrari cars built during these years should be a good starting point to answer your question. Moreover, Borrani also supplied wire wheels to Lamborghini, Maserati and Alfa Rome, ...


7

The 'offset' is the distance between the mounting face of the wheel (i.e. the bit that sits against the hub) and the centreline of the wheel. A positive offset is where the mounting face is towards the outside of the wheel, and negative is set towards the inside. Therefore, if you get wheels that are more positive than the current ones, they will sit ...



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