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20

What is going on in the transmission and the engine under these two scenarios? Coasting: nothing much. The transmission is effectively disengaged (it's more complicated than that but it's a reasonable approximation). The engine is idling - burning fuel to keep itself spinning. Engine braking: the transmission is engaged and the whole system's net ...


9

For the majority of brakes, they should be fine after a track day, but the real risks come from significantly overheating the brake fluid, or from stopping with hot brakes and having them cool while parked. This is why at track days it is always recommended that you stop after ten or so laps, if you have standard brake systems, to allow your brake fluid and ...


6

Coasting is the same as letting the engine idle and burns up fuel. Letting the car in gear on the other hand, uses no fuel at all because your electronic injection system monitors engine load and knows that in such a situation no power is needed and cuts of fuel immediately, turning your engine to an air pump for all practical purposes. So letting the car ...


6

Here is what is going on in your scenarios: Coasting in neutral: The engine is running at idle, the gears in the transmission are disconnected from the drive shafts (the drive shafts being what connect the transmission to the drive wheels, which are the front wheels on your Honda). The engine and transmission are suffering no more wear than they would were ...


6

There are 3 key factors to work on when uprating for higher revs: Moving parts Spinning a rod, cam or flywheel faster than it is rated for will result in it destroying itself, often spectacularly, as the stresses become too much. Moving linkages and pistons back and forth also takes a lot of energy - Kinetic energy = 1/2 m v squared, and it is that ...


6

Are there any other precautions that I should take when using snow chains? Not really ... what they give in the instructions are spot on. DO NOT exceed the 40mph or vehicle damage will ensue. You can also lose control of the vehicle if running faster than recommended. Running chains on bare roadways will cause damage to the road surface. Why can't I ...


6

When you are traveling 20-30 mph, shift into high gear (6th IIRC) and push the gas 1/2 to 3/4 of the way down. If you see the RPM rise with no immediate increase in speed, the clutch is worn to the point that it is slipping. The amount of time between slight slippage and total failure is usually not very long. For a higher power car, you can expect to ...


5

"Blipping" the throttle just means giving it a very short (half a second) stab raising the RPM for a short time. It creates smoother down shifts because it raises the RPM to where it's going to be after the shift so the synchros have less work to do.


5

My experience, limited to a few very specific configurations is: I've never had rotor warping issues even after a LOT of heat in the brakes (both from track days and also stuck brakes while driving on the express way). I've used generic NAPA rotors, OEM rotors, and fancy heat/cryo treated ones. I can't tell any difference between any of them. They all ...


4

The rev limiter would have to be removed. This would be involved in a custom DME. With the limiter removed then you'd be able to blow it up if you wanted to. To support the higher revs, the vehicle would need the engine internals worked on. Stronger camshaft(s), valves, valve springs. (Head work). Depending on the strength of the rotating assembly at the ...


3

I would check/replace the strut's top mount. The rubber may be worn allowing excessive movement at the top of the strut. Try pulling in the strut to see if the top mount moves excessively. If the rubber looks OK and nothing is worn, try loosening the mounting bolts and see if it can be relocated slightly to move the spring away from the panel it is ...


3

The synchros will be forced to bear the brunt of downshifting like this The synchromesh gears are gears inside the manual transmission designed to help the engine transition smoothly to its new RPM. They will wear out eventually, but the wear and tear will be accelerated by downshifting without adding throttle to help the engine match its new speed. The ...


3

There are two likely possibilities, and it could be both: Abuse As described in James' answer, with the right owner a clutch could be decimated with relatively low mileage. With mileage that low it would take some serious abuse to get there. Low Quality The clutch may have been built with low quality components. The Scion xA and xB of the mid 2000's used ...


2

Realistically there is no accurate visual way to tell. Once in a great while you'll see it start to fray, but that is very infrequent. What usually happens is that the belt will stretch beyond it's hold limit, where it will slip a tooth or two, which causes the timing to be haywire and bad things to happen. There is just no visual way you can account for the ...


2

As Cinelli said, you'll have to do extensive work to the header and possibly the rods,pistons and bolts too. But here's a little secret: manufacturers always leave a wide and comfortable margin of error in their mass-produced engines to make them more durable. In the case of your 320i, it is entirely within safe limits to increase almost any ...


2

Probably the most critical part for higher RPM's is the valvetrain. So you want better valve springs and retainers and a custom ground cam that is designed for the RPM you are trying to acheive. This is all to ensure that you don't encounter a situation where the valves cannot close fast enough and the piston head crashes into the valve. The higher the RPM ...


2

All of the other answers are great, but I just want to add that rotors are very, very hard to "warp" from 'normal' use (including track day abuse). Any variance in thickness is because pad material has transferred from the pad to the rotor. Turning the rotor gets rid of this. See "Warped Brake Disc And Other Myths".


2

In a manual tranmission car, the clutch is 'meshed' only when both sides of the clutch - the engine side and the wheel side - are running at the same speed. Downshifting Example I'll make up some numbers for an example: Say you're at 3rd gear, going 45 miles an hour and the engine is at 2.5k RPM. If you downshift while still going 45 miles an hour, the ...


2

Regardless of vehicle configuration the best tires, with deepest tread, go on the rear. This is to ensure that the rear wheels loose friction contact with the road surface last in wet road conditions. When traction is lost on the rear axle before the front the result is that the rear of the vehicle wants to swap ends because the center of mass is closer to ...


1

Other than obvious physical defects such as cracking or fraying, there is no way to visually determine 'how much time' is left before the belt will cause problems. If I were in the same financial situation with this same vehicle/engine, I'd drive it another 10k. As you've stated, this is a non-interference engine. This means the valves and pistons will not ...


1

The Thruxton is gorgeous, it's a pure joy to ride and will put a huge smile on your face. A few things to keep in mind however, it's designed to be a cafe racer, look at how aggressive that riding position is. I'm not sure about Australia, but in the states, replacement parts for British bikes are much harder to come by than Honda parts.



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