Hot answers tagged

7

If you can see and access the crack, a two-part epoxy or something like JB-Weld can be great for a temporary fix. This page shows the process on a metal radiator for a race car, but your fix would be similar. Clean the site of the repair, and rough up the surface with fine sand paper, especially if working on plastic. Mix the two-part epoxy and generously ...


6

I think the overheating episode did a permanent damage to your car. A gasket could have cracked or the head could have warped or even cracked, thus allowing water into the engine itself. Too much heat in an engine can cause serious problems because heat causes metal to expand. The hotter the engine gets, the tighter clearances become until there are ...


6

Putty/epoxy works but here's a handy tip I picked up from my materials professor to ensure that the crack doesn't propagate: Drill small holes at the ends of the crack to arrest its growth before using metal putty/epoxy to seal the existing crack. My dad used to own a Maxima that developed a crack in the radiator's aluminum head. The mechanic he took ...


4

Certainly sounds like the heater core is leaking coolant into the car's interior. Like Ducatikiller said it should smell a little bit sweet, but if you still can't tell stick your finger in the fluid and give it a rub-test. You will be able to tell water from engine coolant by how it feels. Also have a good look at the floorboards and the firewall in the ...


3

This is a two part answer. The second is depending on whether there is an issue with the first part. First, it could be the drainage channels are blocked which should be toward the front of the vehicle. If you have an electric sunroof, you should be able to run it towards the rear the vehicle and see them in the front at the corners. If you poor some water ...


3

After removing the seat and looking underneath the carpet, there was no evidence of leaking from the heater core. It was rain water, about three gallons of it. Where did this all come from? Nothing from the doors, windows, or underneath the frame of the car. All of this water came from two sheets of metal joining behind the back of passenger brake light. ...


3

Do you mean the rear windscreen or the side door window? If it is the windscreen, I believe they are bonded in and so will be very difficult to do anything with unless you have specialist equipment. If it is the door window, the seals on these usually clip to the door frame and so should be replaceable. You may find they you have to remove the window glass ...


3

If it is one of the veins that is cracked, in an emergency it is sometimes possible to cut the vein and then fold both ends over a few times to seal them. A pair of long nose pliers is usually all you need to do this.


3

I went down the route of some all weather sealant in the end, covered the entire channel where the two panels meet, along with each mounting point for the roof rails. Before applying I removed any previous sealant and cleaned with degreaser, seems to have applied well, fingers crossed it keeps the water out when it next rains.


3

The problem more than likely is the drain tube for the A/C unit is plugged. Where this drains from becomes filled up after a bit of use from the A/C and has no place to go, so drains into the passenger side of the cabin. To fix this, you need to find the drain tube. This is usually located on the passenger side of the vehicle by the firewall (usually ...


3

There is no way to put sealant around the outside of the housing to get it to stop leaking. You could possibly put a sealant within the coolant system, such as Bar's Radiator Stop Leak, which may or may not solve your leak issue temporarily (may solve it permanently, but I never trust it). Your better bet is to just replace the gasket. This is a ...


3

The best success I've had drying any carpet is with an upholstery attachment on a carpet cleaner or with a shop-vac. Since it smells damp maybe it would be a good time to use a carpet cleaner on the whole thing. If you don't have one of those they have vacuums at car washes that should work. Some Damp-Rid might help dry it out and help the smell after you ...


2

While it is not imperative that it is completely flush together, it will make a difference. You will have a leak possibility there. This is the reason you replaced the weather stripping in the first place. What you need to do is stretch the weather stripping down on both sides so it will come together in the middle. If you start at dead center on the top ...


2

A large number of people recommend sodium silicate - sold as "liquid glass in the US I believe. This is also used as an egg preservative. An excellent user discussion of sodium silicate and other materials can be found here. I'm in New Zealand. Here we have a material named "Soldrit Super Soda" which has been on the market for 40+ years (ask me how I know ...


1

I would begin to look around your windshield molding, front and back. Ensure the rubber is not dry rotted. Dry rot can occur from many heat cycles (night/day) as well as ultra violet light exposure. The spotlight mount is also a good place to check to ensure the rubber mount is nicely sealed against the body of the car. If water can into the body, during ...


1

Since that brake booster is very vital in the function of your brakes, I would HIGHLY suggest just replacing it; You could even get one from a junkyard depending on the year. Once you get water into the brake booster, depending on the quality and coatings of the metal used; You can possibly rot the diaphragm or rust out the inside. I just recently worked ...


1

One other thing that may be the problem is that the water pump could have locked up. If the pump was running off of the timing belt/chain then it could have seized. This could have jammed the belt, and locked the engine. This could cause the valves to stop moving, while the pistons carry on. This causes the pistons to smash into the valves which could ...


1

Get a friend to spray water on the windshield and surrounding areas while you are inside the car doors closed with a flashlight looking under the dash. Don't spray the water forcibly at the windshield try to make it like a rain shower. You can make a simple stand out of pump pipe holding a shower head to do the same thing if you don't have an assistant.


1

I wish you luck. In my experience any car that's 10 years old or more is probably leaking somewhere, just most times people haven't noticed yet (although, they eventually notice when the floor rusts through and falls out). The causes of leaks are multitude. You just have to go around every spot where there's a break in the metal (antennas, windows, trim, ...


1

Another area to pay attention to is if you have a sun/moon roof installed in your vehicle. These have drain tubes which can come loose and allow leakage inside the vehicle in odd places. You'd probably need to remove the sun roof to figure out if this has happened. I would not suggest you try it if you've never done it before, as a small leak is much better ...


1

The areas for checking the leak are the window channels, the grooves which the glass slides in, are fully in place to the top of the window frame; The glass is sitting in the window channels squarely, adjustment can usually be made on the glass retainers behind the doors trim panel; The door aperture seal is correctly fitted and in good condition, the ...



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