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9

It is the sound of the fuel pump priming and pressurizing the fuel lines, which is absolutely normal. VW likes to use the opening of the driver door to trigger fuel rail pressurization. In fact, one could use the absence of the sound of the fuel pump as a tell-tale sign that the fuel pump relay is not functioning properly. As @Paulster2 points out, either ...


0

Wipers are made from rubber. The quality of the rubber and its ability to squeegee the water off the glass is what you are actually buying. You get what you pay for. Generic vs Bosch... Obviously one is better and will last longer before ripping or crumbling apart. Wipers come in whats called an assembly that attach to the windshield wiper pole that is ...


0

If, when you hit the switch, you hear nothing (no binding noises from the motor), then it probably is your motor at fault. You'll need to open the inside door panel and check the leads for power. If you get power through the leads (leads being the plug at the window motor), then it's probably your motor at fault. You can check your motor by applying power ...


1

The clutch is responsible for disengaging the engine from the transmission. There are basically 2 issues you can have with a clutch - slipping, and not disengaging. Slipping will occur when your clutch is engaged, but the engine revs up without accelerating the vehicle, as if you were still riding the clutch. This means you need a new clutch. Not ...


0

Yes it is reasonable. Remember, you only agreed to the cost of disassembly, which was the initial cost of $375. Taking things apart is usually far easier than putting them back together. Considering what is in their list of repairs, there was more than just the valve cover removed to figure out the issues. I'll almost guarantee you they removed the head as ...


1

Refuse to pay - they're trying to coerce you to use their services... On most cars, removing the cam cover is a 5 minute operation, and replacing it would be similar. Even a really complicated one isn't going to take more than half an hour, unless loads of stuff needs to be removed to get to it. I'd therefore consider 1-2 hours labour (at however much your ...


0

Engine internals can last a very long time. They are generally built to at least survive beyond the standard warranty term for the vehicle in question. This is typically 100K miles in modern vehicles. However, improper maintenance, driving beyond the normal parameters of the engine, and contamination can cause rapid deterioration of service life. Given the ...


3

It means that your camshaft position sensor or crank angle sensor is faulty. Either because they are actually faulty, or there is a wiring problem. Clearing the code won't do much. The symptoms of a bad cam or crank sensor are usually rough idling, difficulty starting and misfiring. Which makes sense, because your ECU gets wrong information regarding the ...


-4

When cars overheat, you must stop immediately there and then, otherwise local hotspot in the engine will result. Then part of engine warps under heat and is no longer air tight. At this stage car needs to be junked (or sold). So overheating is one of the most serious, if not the most serious problems that can happen to a car. Based on the noise you ...


0

It is either the alternator that has problem or there is some lights or similar that are constantly draining the battery. If you don't know how to repair cars nor have a lot of money to fix cars, do not drive European cars. Your car do not seems to have serious problem but may cause a few thousand to fix because any small problem also costs quite a bit. ...


3

Classic fuel starvation, probably caused by an old, gummed up fuel filter. Replace the fuel filter and purge the injectors (remove them from the head, crank the engine a few times and clean the injectors thoroughly). If this doesn't solve things get the fault codes read as it could be something like a problem with the injector loom.


1

You are mentioning that your windows, mirrors, and etc electrical things are not working correctly. The issue could be in your electrical wiring, sensors, relays. Also you said you tried to start it and it wouldn't start the next day after it was running fine the day before. That tells me that your alternator might not be keeping your battery charged. Could ...


0

Does your automatic transmission have a manual shift mode? Is it possible that you pushed the lever from auto mode into manual shift mode? I've never heard of a bad or missing fuse causing this, but a misplaced shift lever could cause exactly what you describe. The second thing I would do is swap the taillight fuse back where you found it to see if that ...


1

The indicator lever is probably spot on for the issue. There appears to be a triple-square fastener which attaches the steering wheel to the column. The guy in this video on air bag & steering wheel removal says you can get away with using a T55 Torx head to pull the fastener. Other than that, it appears the job requires T20 & T25 Torx drivers. In ...


1

Diesels have never absolutely needed it - even on older diesels, they'd still usually start without waiting for the glow plugs. However it does make it very much easier for the engine, so starting will be easier in adverse conditions (cold/altitude) where otherwise the engine might not catch. Also you'll find the engine runs rough for a few seconds until ...


11

I have both a 2004 Bora TDI (Jetta Mk4 in the US) and a 2012 Mk6 TDI Golf. When either of these cars requires it's warm up system, it will automatically switch it on for the time it needs. This is signified by the glow plug light illumination on the dashboard: Once it's up to the temperature it requires, the light goes out and the car can be started. I ...


3

If this is what your rear drum looks like: There probably is a Torx head screw in the "6th hole" (smaller hole located at about 2 o'clock in this photo). All you should have to do is remove the Torx screw and ensure the e-brakes are not engaged. If the e-brakes are too tight, you may need to back them off mechanically. You should be able to find an ...


0

If it is anything like the old VW Golf II I ran way back when -and, judging from the photos on the Internet, it does seem identical to all intents and purposes- you will need to take out the split pin and castellated hub nut in order to remove the drum. It does seem a quite fiddly job, though, with the various springs and wedges that need to be set ...


1

From your description, it sounds like your catalytic convertor is shot. If the honeycomb within the converter shatters, it creates a hug obstruction within the converter. The back pressure this creates will not allow your engine to rev to its potential. This really shows up when trying to accelerate. Depending on where the hole in the exhaust is, you may be ...


2

I had this in one of my Mk1 Golf GTI's and what had actually happened was that the bulkhead had corroded and the steering rack mount came away from the bulkhead which caused the steering column to disconnect from the rack thus loosing all steering. Thankfully it happened at a low speed. Definitely a weak point on the Mk1 Golf and anyone else reading this ...


6

Found it was because a bolt holding the steering rack in place had sheared. Very dangerous and glad I decided to visit a mechanic!


1

It also depends on if your car is set for long life service intervals or not. I've got the Bora 1.9 TDI PD130 (2004 model year) and it seems to need oil changes every 20k miles. Checking the oil level regularly is very important as low oil on these engines will cause untold damage. Also, if you change the oil more frequently than required then this is ...


2

As brake pads wear, the piston is pushed further and further out of the caliper. Around the edge of the piston is a rubber boot but this sits flush with the caliper so as the piston rests further and further away from this, it can corrode. When fitting new pads, the piston must be pushed back into the caliper and the exposed areas can be awkward to get ...


2

It sounds to me like they cocked the piston in the caliper sideways when they collapsed it during the brake job. This could be caused from a worn caliper piston. It may or may not have been their fault, but would be hard to prove. My suggestion is to have the caliper replaced. This should fix the issue. I don't see any way this could be related to the ABS ...


0

It depends on which engine you have, but following this guideline, you should do as follows: Engine Frequency TDI First @ 5k miles, then @ 10k, then every 10k miles 1.8T Every 5k miles 2.0L First @ 5k miles, then @ 10k, then every 10k miles NOTE: I don't actually believe the 2.0L came in the 2004, just the ...



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