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8

Personally I wouldn't be all that concerned unless the oil leak was large. One simple check for the state of health of the engine would be to take the car to an independent mechanic and have a compression test done. It won't catch everything that could be wrong with the engine, but if the compression test comes out OK, it can provide you a bit more peace ...


6

Generally, the outside temperature sensor is located under the front of the hood near the bottom of the car. Although the sensor itself is accurate, the location causes the sensor to pick up heat from the road surface. Thus, it will usually read several degrees higher than the air temperature. This is especially noticeable when driving on high speed ...


5

Other possible sources: Vacuum Leak Other Ignition item (Plug Wires, Distributer, etc.) Really poor fuel Air Filter Blocked Exhaust Blockage I would start with the spark plugs. Take them out and see if they can give any indication as to the true problem. See this answer for more info (While you have them out, replace them if you need to). Then start ...


5

I don't know the specifics of that car, so I'm going to take a stab and assume we're talking about coil springs. Springs only squeak where they contact something else, which is why spraying them didn't help. If you can't see anything else in contact with the spring have a look at the top and bottom seats. Those seats sometimes wear. Not necessarily all the ...


5

If you live in a wooded area there is little you can do as far as a permanent(non lethal) solution. The problem seem more likely if the vehicle is driven infrequently. I have heard that some rodents have a dislike for the smell of cedar. You can purchase cedar wood blocks for moth protection in most department stores. I would place a few in stategic places ...


5

We have a Mk4 TDI Jetta that makes a sound after startup that might be described as a sneeze. I'm fairly confident that it's the starter motor's overrun clutch. As soon as the engine "starts," it begins turning faster than the starter can turn. For this reason, starters have a one-way clutch, called an overrun or sprag clutch. This permits the starter to ...


4

This seems to be the clutch is going out or possibly the synchromesh is no longer working. The clutch is unable to fully disengage the engine from the transmission to allow you to shift into reverse. If the synchromesh is no longer working fully, this would make it harder to shift in every gear but it's still possible. You are, in essense, ...


4

I'd say that was pretty low mileage. I generally work on a ballpark figure of 10-12k/year, so I'd expect an average 10 year old car to have at least 100k on the clock. The things to watch for a low mileage car is that maintenance may have been neglected, especially if it has been standing unused for any length of time. Check the maintenance records to make ...


4

It looks an awful lot like you have diagnosed all of the really hard problems and come up negative. I wonder if you have a simple mechanical problem: is the linkage sound between the hot / cold selector and the flapper valve that forces air past the heater core. From what I hear, the foam around the flapper is also prone to disintegration in humid ...


4

Golf TDis (and I'd imagine other VWs of that era) are notorious for the Turbos failing. It can be a very expensive fix once it goes properly, so I'd get it investigated asap. From your description, I'd surmise that oil is seeping through one of the seals into the turbo, then when you rev the engine and the turbo spools up, the oil that has accumulated at ...


4

Have a look at your owners manual if it states a maximum oil consumption. I don't think that 750ml over a whole oil change interval is a lot. My guess would be that it's more likely an issue with the turbo and investigating if it is shouldn't be that expensive. Essentially you or your mechanic would need to pull the pipes going from the turbo to the intake ...


4

It varies a lot, but in general it is placed somewhere where it will get as accurate a reading as possible - avoiding engine heat etc. In most of mine it has been low down behind the front bumper, but I did have one car that had the sensor below the driver's door. Misplacement may lead to the effect @Barry pointed out, but in any case, many are ...


4

You can see the corrosion on the pipe around the clip - even if Radweld or similar is able to temporarily stop the leak, I doubt that it'll last very long. At the rate that it's leaking, there is bound to be a bunch of fairly sizeable holes corroded into the pipe. For that reason alone I would change out the pipe as soon as I could. If that breaks (worst ...


4

The first O2 sensor is the one that the ECU uses to set the fuel-air mixture. If you had a problem with your first O2 sensor, the car would not run at its best. This error is on the second O2 sensor, sometimes called the "tattletail" sensor. On your Jetta, the second sensor is basically responsible only for turning on the "check engine" light if the ...


4

Driving the car should get rid of them. If you're worried about the mess they leave behind I guess you can take the battery out and hose everything down or something. If you want them to stop coming back when leaving the car alone for a long time I heard that putting a shop light under the engine compartment might help.


4

ELM documentation indicates that this is not a query-only problem. I see on page 31 of that document that the issue was that of the rate at which J1850 requests arrive at the OBD system (this is a consequence of the April 2002 update of the J1979 standard). Specifically, they warn you against querying at rates higher than 100 milliseconds (also known as 10 ...


4

As far as general mechanic info there's a ton of good information on here, and all over the web. I've found a lot of instructional YouTube videos on many of the things I've done myself. For Jetta specific information there's a good group of people over at the VW Vortex forums that can probably help you figure out anything you'd need to know. Most of the ...


4

The fault you describe appears to be a simple matter of 'parasitic drain' on the battery. Disconnect the battery earth terminal, connect a ampmeter between the cable and the battery post. Run the ampmeter to outside of the bonnet and close the bonnet without trapping the ampmeter wires. Make sure all doors are closed, they do not have to be locked. After ...


4

The Aux port is simply an SPDIF (3.5mm headphone) port that turns your car stereo into an expensive set of speakers for your MP3 player. It doesn't do anything fancy like "communicating" with your device, aside from accepting incoming audio. I don't know anything about your specific car, but generally you switch your car's audio system to Aux-in mode when ...


3

I wouldn't risk it. If the water pump fails you can easily cook the engine, leading to no end of problems (failed head gasket, warped head, etc). The temperature gauge will only give you an accurate reading if the coolant is flowing through the engine - if it isn't you will end up with hot spots very quickly. A lot of modern cars have an ecu-controlled ...


3

There are some inherent risks to buying a car that age regardless of mileage. You should do a good bit of research on common problems and any recalls on the jetta before purchasing it. I'd also recommend checking out both the electrical system and for any rust on vehicle (both are common issues with Volkswagon vehicles). Regardless of mileage it's good ...


3

I agree, you don't want to take the seller's word for it. This could be a serious problem. If it is indeed an "oil pickup pipe" that's dirty, that means oil is not flowing through the engine properly. That means more wear on every moving part in the engine, particularly if the current owner has ignored the problem and continued to drive the car. Without ...


3

On some of my manuals, I've found that before shifting into reverse, putting the shifter into 5th gear helps. I don't have a mechanical explanation for this (my thought is something to do with the synchromesh). Try it, see if it helps at all. On my current vehicle my process to go to reverse is: Clutch pedal in Go to neutral Go into 5th Go into reverse ...


3

Though I may not be correct, have you tried opening your hood and using a spray bottle of water on your spark plug wires? Lightly mist around where the wires connect on both ends of the wires, and maybe a few squirts around on the wires themselves. If the vehicle stutters, it may just be that the wires need to be replaced...


3

If the wrong tension is on the belt one of two things could happen Too loose: Skip a tooth or two on the belt - this leads to early/late firing and possibly pistons slapping on to valves if the clearances are already tight. Too tight: extra tension put on the belt - this can lead to bearings being incorrectly loaded and at worst a failure in the belt - ...


3

I dont think you have much to worry about honestly. I'd be more worried about the plastic link between the metal key and the plastic key fob breaking. (I have a TDi as well - a 2001.) My keys are heavy and have a lot of stuff, and i've never had an issue with it. Is it possible? Sure. Is it likely? No.


3

Have you checked for a blown fuse? You may also be able to reach the release either by reaching into the wheel well or removing an interior panel. Another option is that the latch is released but the spring that pops the door open is broken. Have an assistant try to open the door while you actuate the switch.


3

It's possible that the smoke you're seeing isn't indicative of any major problem. Some of the VW diesel engines have a tendency to build up unburned fuel and other deposits on the exhaust side of the engine if they're driven for short trips and driven too gently. I don't have direct experience with the SDI engine, but this is a real problem for the TDI ...


3

Maybe your water pump failed? Causing your coolant to boil inside the block destroying seals and gaskets allowing water and oil to invade where they shouldn't, further boiling/burning into smoke and eventually stalling the engine. First thing you want to do is investigate what caused your cooling system to fail and also identify where your fluids went. Was ...


3

"Juddering" is as good a description as any of how a diesel runs when not all cylinders are firing. Gray smoke from the exhaust is unburned fuel (i.e., it has been injected into a cylinder, mixed with air, but not burnt). If your Golf is new enough to have a catalyst (many VW diesels are), then unburned fuel in the exhaust will quickly damage it, so you ...



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