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I had 1987 Toyota Celica which at about 5 years old (just out of warranty), suffered a nasty engine malfunction. A screw holding an intake butterfly onto its shaft (one per intake port) came loose and fell into the intake, along with butterfly itself. This, of course, happened while I was driving on a highway. All I knew is that the engine suddenly started ...


1

Many people are not reading the question. This plug didn't fail on the compression stroke, it failed when the user broke it while trying to remove it. I'm not sure what "fell through the valve, after bending it and causing the valve to burn (possibly)" means. The engine wasn't running. How would anything bend or burn? STOP. Do not run the engine. The ...


1

It's very likely that the engine is already severly damaged. A twenty mile trip would most possible kill it. The best you can do is to get your car towed to a service


8

No question - running the engine will break it. If you're "unlucky", there's enough clearance between the piston and the valves to fit the spark plug. In that case you'll have the spark plug rattling around inside the cylinder. In approximate order, this will first destroy the valves which will not seal properly when their edges and seat faces get damaged,...


4

I've seen this before on a Zetec Ford Focus Estate. The noise of the engine running with a missing plug made it sound like a lawn mower. Whilst the car could theoretically have been driven a very short distance (i.e. to move it out of danger, not 20+ miles) we decided that it wasn't worth the risk to try and move it under it's own power and towed it with ...


22

That's a nice car - don't be a consumer and break it because you're too lazy to fix it properly. Sadly the "proper" fix is to tow it to your mechanic, who will take the head off and fish out the broken pieces. He'll also check the head and valves for damage while its off, and make a recommendation. An old engine idling at low speed might happily burp out ...


29

Do NOT drive a car with a piece of sparkplug inside the engine. It can (and likely will) lead to serious damage (up to a catastrophic engine failure). Get your car towed to a service and have the pieces of the broken plug removed. Additionally, get the oil changed (probably with a flush too, to remove all the debris). You will have to spend some money on ...


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At the very least drain the oil, but I suggest that you take the oil pan off, clean it thoroughly, fill it up again, run for a day or so, and repeat. The piece that broke my engine probably went through the oil channels 30 to 100 times before it hit the right spot. I speak based on experience. I made the mistake of running an engine after this happened to ...


16

If this happened during a plug change If you have roadside assistance/towing, I would highly recommend getting it towed home, then purchase a cheap USB inspection camera or a inspection unit like this one from Harbor Freight and look inside the spark plug hole to see if there is any remnants of the plug and any trauma to the exhaust value. If it ...


39

That sounds very risky to me. The portions of the plugs that reside in the combustion chamber are designed to tolerate the heat and pressure there. I don't think they will melt. So what will happen is that those parts are likely to remain in the cylinder and may get caught between the top of the piston and the head and/or valves. That is likely to do more ...


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Brake fluid burns white if the diaphram in the booster chamber ruptures. Do you get more white smoke when you pump the brakes? Maybe just check brake fluid level.


0

I am writing an OBDII app for Android and my extensive testing has showed that Yes it can have a negative impact on the cars performance. I have had test outcomes where all the lights on the dash light up and the engines torque is reduced. I believe this could be related to overloading of the OBD circuitry with constant commands being issued from an app. I'm ...


1

It looks like the new(used) cluster would need to be reprogrammed by a dealer or shop with the proper equipment. You may want to do some basic voltage drop tests on the cluster before deciding to replace. Including checking fuse terminal fit etc...


3

Nice engine you got there! While your issues do sound like a MAF problem (check the MAF readings via OBD!), some turbocharged Volvos are notorious for fuel pressure regulator issues. Basically the regulator diaphragm ruptures and fuel gets into the pressure regulation vacuum hose. Typically this causes poor starting (especially hot) because of an excessively ...


2

Depends on what you would like to do with it. If you just want to clear some generic codes and the check engine light, then most generic OBD2 cables should work with appropriate software. If you want to do more advanced things, like reading Volvo specific codes or changing available parameters then what you need is VIDA + DiCE. It's a Volvo diagnostics tool ...


1

From what I can tell, the 05 uses CAN protocal, not OBD2, and then there are some issues with using a generic tool, and most accepted, if not only official method, is to use a volvo-specific (proprietary) scan tool to read the codes. Look over the link below and it appears that there has been some headway made in adapting a 'generic' scan tool to work, but ...



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