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The answer to this is all based on how hard the vehicle was just driven. More specifically, how heat-soaked the exhaust manifold and turbine housing are. These parts are meant to take extreme heat, however the bearings in the center of the turbocharger and the oil flowing over them are not. In fact, the oils job is not only to lubricate the bearings but to ...


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tl;dr Yes. More boost => more air at higher temperatures => more fuel. Your instincts are correct. If you drive around without loading the engine, the turbo won't spin up nearly so much. More importantly, it won't produce much boost and won't require much more fuel. At a super basic level, there are four things that happen when your turbo starts ...


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You cannot limit the usage of the turbo , it will be very difficult to notice at what time you need to shift in order to not have the turbo spool up which is a distraction. Solution: There is something called a waste gate in most turbocharged engines(that is why I asked what car you use in the comment) If your turbo has a waste gate you can mechanically ...


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It depends. If you floor the car, the air/fuel ratio is dropped from 14.7:1 to 13:1 or even as low as 10:1 depending on the make and model and the boost level. the lower the ratio, the more fuel is wasted in an attempt to keep temperatures under control. As long as you don't floor the car (sending the car into Wide Open Throttle / Open Loop mode), being "on ...


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Does the use of a turbocharger decrease fuel economy? In my application, yes. But only because the turbo boost is so damn addicting! I find that my foot gets heavier than normal in order to achieve maximum boost in each gear. Common sense tells us that more acceleration = more fuel consumption. This answer provides more detail on the above subject: Does ...



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