New answers tagged

1

A common problem is that gunk builds up in the oil feed pipes to the turbo which restricts the flow of oil to the turbo bearings. This then causes rapid failure of the new turbo. Some manufactures require that you replace the oil feed pipes when fitting a new turbo for this reason.


6

What does the term A/R ratio mean? In almost all automotive applications that you are likely to see, turbos are a radial flow, snail shaped turbine section attached to a similar compressor section. As we see in this illustration from the Turbocharger Fundamentals article: How is it computed? The cross-sectional Area to Radius ratio is a ...


5

A few things to consider if you end up doing this: A longer shaft will reduce the speed that you can safely spin the turbos up to It's got to do with something engineers call rotordynamics, although I highly doubt you would need to spin something up to 125,000 RPM for a turbojet application :) You may also find that the existing journal bearings are not ...


11

The A/R ratio is the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the area where gasses flow and the radius of that spot from the center of the turbocharger. Usually the A/R ratio is constant along the channels where gasses flow. In simpler terms The letters A/R refer to Area and Radius. If the radius of the turbocharger is greater at a given point, the ...


2

Sounds like an Air Passage issue to me. This could mean: a bad Mas Air Flow Sensor or maybe a poor Throttle Body Sensor, and maybe even a clogged EGR Valve or a dirty Throttle body Unit. These items can clog with carbon and need to be cleaned or replaced after time. These items cah each be checked with a Probe Light Tester first to make sure you're ...



Top 50 recent answers are included