Hot answers tagged

39

Torque is the name of the game. High torque is needed to move heavy loads. If comparing a gasoline engine to a comparable diesel engine the diesel will always have higher torque. The higher torque comes from the need for a higher compressing ratio needed for compression ignition. To achieve the higher compression ratio a longer stroke is required. The longer ...


18

A major, but often overlooked, reason for the dominance of gasoline engines in passenger vehicles is the need for diesel engines in heavy vehicles. A given quantity of crude oil, depending on its composition, will yield a given quantity of diesel, a given quantity of gasoline, a given quantity of candle wax, and specific given quantities of other petroleum ...


18

They are often times referred to as service loops. Their purpose is to allow some flexibility in the event the master cylinder has to be replaced, or a fitting needs to be repaired. It makes it easier to align the fittings without crossthreading them. AS @Fred Wilson has stated there is flexing. The brakelines will typically be anchored to the frame. The ...


16

It is about vibration. The master cylinder and brake booster are mounted to the firewall; the firewall flexes. They move up and down significantly as the body jerks up and down when driven over bumps. This solution is cheaper to implement than changes to the firewall. It would be challenging to build a firewall rigid enough to support that weight.


15

To OP’s main question: “Why do heavy vehicles almost always use diesel engines?” Answer: Cost and dependability. Diesel engines are significantly more expensive, but have lifetimes many times greater than gasoline engines. For a commercial vehicle that is on the road all day every day, it adds up to big savings because of the better fuel efficiency and less ...


9

Given two engines of similar weight, both operated at their respective optimum efficiency (i.e. maximum mechanical work done per unit of chemical enthalpy in the burnt fuel), you will end up with similar fuel consumption for either engine type. But a Diesel engine will generally offer slightly more power out of this, by giving more torque; that's how it's ...


9

They provide the driver with coverage of two significant blind spots. Especially in cities, there are numerous accidents with cyclists, pedestrians or even small cars being in that blind spot and being hit. These mirrors allow the driver to cover those blind spots and be sure no one is there before he begins a manoeuvre. Safety legislation in Europe may be ...


8

Your truck is designed to carry that load. If you consider carrying a full set of passengers. 1 in the front, 3 in the back, that weight would exceed your current load of 500 pounds. I would not be concerned at all regarding doing on what you plan on doing. In fact, make it 1,000 pounds and do it, your truck would handle that just fine although it may ...


8

What you see could very well be burned coolant as well as oil. As the glycerin burns in the combustion process it can take on corrosive properties that degrade the electrodes. Typically with oil in the combustion chamber you don't see as sever of a an electrode degradation as illustrated in your photos. I think your head gasket change is looming and ...


6

I plowed with a Chevy 1500 and a Ford F250. You could definitely feel the weight of the plow more on the smaller 1500 compared to the F250. The 1500 would squat quite a bit when the plow was lifted. The plow (a Western brand) was professionally installed on both trucks, and the only issues we ever had were electrical with the plow controls, the same kind of ...


6

When sizing springs for a particular application, manufacturers have to get the right physical size for the job, but they also need to worry about the "spring rate" to properly support a given load. The spring rate is basically how much weight it takes to compress the spring. A larger engine is going to be a bigger static load for the suspension, and a ...


6

The issue most likely is, the trailer was empty. The brakes are designed to work well when the trailer is full. As you can imagine, if the dump was full of loose gravel there'd be quite a load in it. When the trailer is empty, the same amount of force on the brake pedal can cause the brakes to lock up easily. This is something more for the driver to worry ...


6

This is not a very easy topic. You are going to want to figure this stuff out for yourself and then do some testing to verify your design assumptions work the way you think they will. For the max steering angle you should be able to get that from different tractor manufacturers. Frankly if it were me, I'd be grabbing a tape measure, a set of old skool ...


5

If it was never converted to use R134a instead of R12, you're not just going to be able to charge it up yourself, since something that old probably came from the factory with R12 refrigerant. You need a license to buy R12 in the United States, and it's not cheap. Since your system is compromised and needs attention anyway, you might as well do the R134a ...


5

For a really quick solution, try getting hold of a spare seatbelt from a scrap vehicle (I doubt the shape changes often, so I expect any reasonably recent Toyota would do, just get one that is the same as the belts in your car). Remove the tongue (The t shaped bit) from the belt, and keep it to hand - then, when you're driving on the trails and want to ...


5

The ISO 1728 document is not public, but I think that it does not specify threads in the palm couplings. It will be different between regions. For Europe, the palm couplings use either a M16×1.5 or M22×1.5 female thread (example, example). Compressed air couplings with a European standard industrial profile of the plugs and a M16×1.5 male thread are ...


4

It's likely non-repairable, unless the vehicle is 15 years + old. The new style radiators are not cost effective to repair. A leak between the tank and the core, can usually be repaired, a leaking tank can usually be replaced. Core repair is difficult if possible, they are made so thin now it's next to impossible to repair. Check with a radiator repair shop ...


4

It's impossible to give a definitive answer here as to what was done with your truck. However, it is often stated that when larger wheels and tires are fitted to a truck, the brakes should be upgraded. This is due to the larger rotational inertia of the larger wheels and tires, which can make the vehicle significantly harder to stop. Therefore, if the ...


4

As@ mac has stated a plow will fit and the truck will push snow. The primary considerations are how often and how long are you going to plow. The longer and more frequently you plow the more the suspension and driveline parts will be stressed. If you are just doing a few driveways you should have no problems. If you plan to plow commercially for long ...


4

If the dump box gets pushed on by a truck or an end loader or whatever, it can cause damage to the box, possibly not even allowing it to dump again. The rear door, while seeming stable to you and me, would be at the mercy of an end loader or bulldozer. Some might want to push the box to get the truck to move, such as if it got stuck or needed a little extra ...


4

The early Volkswagen Beetles (the air-cooled, rear engine'd ones) started off with a 6 volt system, the same as some other classic cars and motorbikes. Obviously there are the 12 volt systems used in most cars and 24 volt used in trucks. The truck systems typically use multiple 12 volt batteries wired in series to provide 24 volts. This is certainly the ...


4

Would there be a substantial enough of a horsepower boost to be noticeable? The most you could see from such a modification is 15hp. This would not be enough for the seat dyno to register, unless there are plenty of hemorrhoids to detect it. More then likely you'd see a measly 5-10hp, and then only at the higher RPM levels would this be apparent. You ...


4

The 3.7 is notorious for having a rocker arm fall off and or lifters collapsing. This is usually accompanied by a check engine light being illuminated. Use a stethoscope or a long screw driver and try to isolate where the knock is coming from. If it's coming from a valve cover, remove the valve cover and you're likely to find a rocker laying around. If ...


3

As @mac has stated it is impossible to know for sure without some photos. Most aftermarket suppliers want everyone to see you have their product. Aftermarket/performance calipers will usually have the name prominently displayed on them. The rotors may be slotted and or drilled but the same size as the originals. If you remove a front and rear wheel you can ...


3

The correct answer will depend on the size of the truck. As long as you have not exceeded the load capacity of the chassis you should be fine. However the longer the springs are the compressed to their maximum deflection the less likely they are to return to their unloaded shape.


3

What about these lights as I discovered in this question CHROME WHITE LED LIGHT NUMBER PLATE SCREW BOLTS Or this one Looks like you just drill a hole for this one


3

There's a possibility that the compressor will have seized up from sitting so long. They really need to be run periodically. However, I've seen some that have sat a long time fire up again just fine.


3

Did you check the inner and outer tie rods for play? How are your ball joints and bushings up front? Were all of those inspected when getting the alignment?


3

I wouldn't use additives to plug a leak unless it's an emergency. That stuff migrates all through your cooling system gunking up everything it can in the process - including radiator tubes with a partial flow restriction... If you are fortunate enough to possess a brass radiator - take it to a rad shop to have the leak soldered. At the same time, get it ...


3

This thread describes a similar problem on a different model year. That said, the symptoms sound strikingly familiar (from the first post in that thread): Make absolutely sure the hole in the bracket is not worn! It should be round with a notch in the top for the new bushing to key into. If the hole is worn even slightly, it's going to have to come ...



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