New answers tagged

3

There are only a few possibilities: Oil pressure is actually low. The light is overloaded with meanings and it is trying to tell you something else. There is a faulty component. There is a fault in the circuit. The first thing to do is to make sure you understand what the light is trying to tell you. For example is the light solely a pressure monitor ...


0

The calculations I have done show that you will only be driving 0.5 amp through the LEDs when the supply is at 14 volts, so you should be ok, since they can take 1.5 amps. Touching the negative wire against the chassis will be shorting the battery, and so bypassing the LEDs, so they shouldn't be damaged. The only thing I can think of is that you haven't ...


1

There are two things here that sound like possible culprits: When the bike is running the voltage seen by the LEDs will be the output of the alternator or generator, which will be around 14.2 V, depending on the LED you're using that might be enough to cause problems. The sparks. They are not a good thing. They imply that there was a sudden rush of current....


1

Did you factor in the resistance supplied by the fuse? Fuses will add resistance (of some level or another) and smaller fuses (smaller conductors) will supply more resistance. But, as noted in the comments, check the voltages at various points (before and after each element). Also, where is the fuse on your diagram? UPDATES Occasionally when wiring I'...


2

I had a problem like this once, it turned out to be the fuel filter. Sometimes the filter would clog while I was driving, but after the engine died and the fuel pressure dropped, the gunk in the filter would shift and I could re-start it again right away. Sometimes I had to let the car sit overnight. If your car has an in-line fuel filter, try removing it ...


1

Bad battery, even though it initially tested well.


2

This problem seems to be a "moving target." It sounds like the problem first presented as "car stops suddenly while driving and even though the fuel gauge shows what should be adequate fuel, adding fuel gets the car going again." Then it moved to "dying while driving down the road" and now it "won't start." It is good that you've got a bit of history on ...


2

Assuming by 'ran out of gas at quarter tank', you mean the car wouldn't start until you put more gas, but quarter of the tank was filled with proper fuel. If this is the case, number of things can be at fault. Main fuel pump sits inside the fuel tank (usually under the rear seat) and pumps fuel from the tank to the engine. This is usually a quick job to ...


1

Open the hood a listen for where the gurgling is coming from: Find the water pump and listen there Listen near the radiator Listen near the coolant tank Listen near the top of the engine Also, look for where your coolant is going: Look for puddles or stains where you usually park With the engine off, look near the belts for drops of liquid, stains, and ...


1

How is the turbo pressure regulated in these cars? If there is a linkage that actuates the wastegate maybe it needs adjustment.


0

Addition to dlu's answer. Look for restrictions in the intake and exhaust. You can try bypassing the intercooler. For the exhaust, you can temporarily set up an open pipe out of the turbo. either way, something is restricting the turbo from keeping up.


1

My first thought, based on the boost dropping as you rev the engine before the turbo was replaced is that there is an inlet restriction. Something like a dirty air filter or damaged inlet piping. That could also cause the replacement turbo to fail to deliver full boost. One quick check for this would be to remove the compressor inlet pipe from the ...


1

There is of course one factor that seems to have been missed; driver error. Stalling could cause a motor to stop and it could then easily be restarted. Flooding, although this is associated with older carburettor fed cars, could also cause a motor to stop but it could be restarted. Incorrect setting of the choke (again, you're looking back to older manual ...


1

I've seen this happen with a faulty after market immobilizer of the type which cuts power to the fuel pump to prevent theft. Basically, it was going bad and would occasionally not let the car start, or cut power to the fuel pump relay while driving. Then the car would start back up fine, or start after X number of tries. Disconnecting the immobilizer from ...


0

Once upon a time, I had a car that did this. Over and over. The connector for the wiring harness that ran the fuel pump worked loose. The car stopped. The bouncing involved in towing the car to the shop jostled it back into place. The car worked. We eventually diagnosed it by driving it over a street with potholes.


8

This is what I can think of, in my limited knowledge. Overlaps with some existing answers. Trying to limit to things that aren't obvious, also trying to think of direct physical causes rather than things that may or may not trigger certain ECU software to make an explicit shutdown decision (I assume there's a lot of variation here, so it's kinda hard to ...


-1

An external cause: if there is too less oxygen in the intake air. This can intentionally be accomplished by using a CO2-fire-extinguisher (a fire-fighter technique). Maybe this is also possible if the car takes in too much exhaust gases from the car/truck in front of him.


1

Electrical trouble tripping the autoshutdown relay. Overheating. Loose electrical connection at either fuel pump, ignition switch or spark plugs.


0

Replace those fuses by proper ones, they are inexpensive. Then test your car to make sure everything still works, then inspect the fuses again. Some aftermarket remote starters will drain your battery very quickly. My dad's 96 Toyota Corolla had this issue, it stopped when we disconnected the remote starter. Test your alternator, make sure your battery is ...


1

That sounds to me like an ignition switch that is failing. Do you have a lot of keys that share the same keyring as the key for the ignition? You might start by removing as much weight as you can from the keyring. If you have a heavy key ring, and that doesn't reliably fix it, then look into the cost of a new ignition switch. Intermittent problems like this ...


4

You mention, "no draining electrics," can you say more about how you determined this? It's important because "a self-draining battery" requires something that is causing a load on the battery – especially since you have a relatively new battery. On newer cars, there is a risk that disconnecting the battery may cause problems with your radio or other on-...


3

What can drain your battery is Alarm system, Radio (memory), Remote control key (radio signal receiver), ECU, Clock... Can't imagine anything else. Even if you have all of this, they shouldn't drain a battery in one week. Only thing you can do is to get a Ampere Meter and stick it in that faulty fuse to see what it drains. The fuse can not drain anything, ...


9

It wouldn't be the fuse which is causing the power drain, but the circuit the fuse is there to protect. (This is the reason why the copied area you have posted has 5 "Not Helpful" votes against it.) The fuse is only a conduit. It transmits electricity. When the circuit transmits too much electricity, the fuse heats up, then "pops", not allowing anymore ...


3

Try this: get a water spray and a friend that can help you to rev until the noise comes in, then start to spray one suspecting item, say, the alternator's pulley/belt. Just a bit of water there...and do with the rest if you don't see the noise disappear. What you will be doing is to lubricate the pulley with water, so the belt won't squeal. This is a very ...


0

You can rev it up and see if the vane boosts it to 100% at any moment. If not, it's a ECU not allowing to reach the pressure. So the issue is somewhere before your turbo, like detonation, pre-ignition... If it doesn't open a boost fully, you should see your Lambda sensor readings. Do you have knock sensors? Is the smoke white or black? If the smoke ...


5

Some thoughts on how to verify if you have... an intake obstruction Disconnect the air filter (keep the MAF in place) to expose the compressor inlet and log boost values with the car at idle and under load. If the boost numbers are close to what the engine computer is expecting then this would confirm that something upstream the MAF is obstructing the ...


2

A simple cause of boiling coolant is a radiator cap that doesn't hold pressure anymore. The cooling system is designed to be under a small amount of pressure, and that pressure increases the boiling temperature of water to the 250 degree neighborhood. A working cap will hold 12-15psi, and without it holding pressure, boiling happens much sooner, depending ...


1

Coolant boiling over usually indicates poor coolant circulation. Either your water pump is starting to fail (they usually leak a little bit when they start to fail) or your cooling system is partially obstructed. Here's things to check: look at the area near your water pump for small leaks (indicates worn out water pump) check your coolant level in the ...


4

So you stripped everything down and now don't know how to get them back..? Okay, once you fit your carb on the engine, you'll have a angled rubber tube (manifold) between a cylinder head and carburetor. On the side of that manifold should be a little fitting for a hose pipe. That hose pipe is sending a vacuum from manifold to a fuel pump that is located ...


0

After looking at a ground distribution diagram the cruise, head lights and power door locks share some things in common. Given that some things I assume work and others that obviously don't, it would be isolated to a single branch of the circuit. Unfortunately these splices are located in the dash and the dash may need to be removed or pulled back to gain ...


2

The problem, as @SteveRacer suggested, was caused by a faulty camshaft angle/position sensor. Everything we had read about that sensor said the engine would not start or would immediately die if it was bad, so we didn't think to check it. After replacing with a known good part, the engine runs much better and builds boost, but is still running a little ...


5

I finally got a chance to investigate more and figured it out. After letting it cool during the initial trip, I was able to check the coolant, and it was bone dry. I added about 3.2 liters to the 3.3 liter capacity radiator. I noticed the seal of the reserve tank was damaged, and the radiator cap seal was falling apart as well. I refilled the radiator and ...


5

Sounds exactly like worn brake pads to me. Have you checked those recently? Brake pads actually have a wear tab on them like the one pictured below. This is designed to make noise (that chirping sound) before the brake pads are catastrophically low. The noise would be present almost always while driving as the tab is meant to be in constant contact with the ...


0

Not positive how it is set up on your vehicle, but here is where I would look. Go under the hood, find the steering column. There should be a tube around the column with linkage that goes down to the transmission. There should be a piece with raised pieces to help you not accidentally shift out of park. Around here somewhere should be a spring that holds ...


0

You will need to have your battery load tested. Autozone or similar performs this service at no charge. Assuming that you have driven the vehicle for some length of time, the new alternator should have charged your battery sufficiently- or perhaps not- that is why it should be tested.



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