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10

Much of what makes wheels appear dirty is brake dust. Brake dust is wear particles from the brake pads and rotors (or from linings and drums, in the case of drum brakes). The braking effort in most vehicles is not equally distributed between front and rear wheels--this is by design. Generally the front wheels do most of the braking work, since weight ...


7

I'd say there are many pros and cons for newer and older as a starter (I went older, 84 Nissan 300ZX Turbo). Newer (lets say 15 years or newer so we are talking about 1996+ which should have ODB2) Pros OEM Parts Availability More Cars in Junk Yard to pull parts from (dependent on production numbers, but still more than older models) Less wear and tear ...


7

If buying one of the pre-assembled sets is not an option, the following answers will assume you will keep your tools in some form of carry bag... You can begin by alienating all your sockets, and sorting them. Purchase a couple of socket rails, which can be had for cheap, and snap them on. Insert these into your bag. Next, alienate your wrenches and sort ...


7

There are other factors that affect the start stop feature. I am not sure on that exact model but generally the following things will keep the car engine from shutting off: Coolant Temp too high, or too low The engine has not ran for at least two minutes The AC is on and not in the economy mode Low Vacuum Battery charge low High current draw on the 12 volt ...


7

The fact that the light bar lights up means that it works. If the fault is consistent, I'd be more tempted to look for the fault at the brake pedal - where the switch for the light is. As your existing brake lights work correctly, next step is to see whether they use the same switch, as per @Brian's comment. It may be that the LED bar has been wired in ...


5

Sounds like the clutch master cylinder is leaking. If you pump up the pedal with your foot, it might retain pressure for you to drive for a while, but after it sits, the symptoms will return. Time to replace the clutch master cylinder or check for brake line leaks.


5

I strongly support PetroEkos's suggestion of a tool bag. I'll go even further and suggest that you invest in a separate job bag: i.e., take some time before the task to reach into your (now nicely organized) selection of tools and make a good guess as to which tools you're definitely going to need. You usually won't get the inventory exactly right but ...


5

The best resource I've found, for someone mechanically inclined, is the specific Factory Service Manual for whatever car you are working on. They typically describe how to disassemble the entire car, step by step, with pictures. If you're into a more basic "Why are cars designed this way?" type of discussion. Google, or the site: howstuffworks.com is also ...


4

NOTE: the below assumes that you aren't talking about ECU-controlled cars that explicitly pull timing intentionally at high revs. In the spirit of checking the easy answers, you should check the map in the ECU. If you're looking for measurable factors, there are two critical items that might trigger detonation and, therefore, convince the engine to pull ...


4

Usually coolant temperature problems as you described (without leaks) are caused by any of the following or a combination thereof: Partially blocked or missing ducting to the radiator so either not enough air reaches the radiator or it goes past the radiator instead of through it. This should be relatively easy to eyeball. Thermostat not opening fully (or ...


4

There are quite a few different rubber hoses in the average engine bay - have you check to make sure none are in contact with anything hot? Especially any that run near to the exhaust manifold. For that matter, if you can get under it, check the entire exhaust to make sure nothing is in contact with it that shouldn't be. You've mentioned the belt which ...


4

If you are simply buying it to try to fix your car, and not as a tool to have, car part stores sometimes read the codes for you. The readers will usually have a description, but if not OBD-II became a government standard in 1996. The codes are basically the same accross the board, and any additional codes are manufacturer specific. To translate them, you can ...


4

It's just in front of the front passenger side door, under the dashboard. It might be stuck down behind the carpet a ways.


4

Three possibilities occur to me right away: Nick could be right in this other answer: it could be a CV joint. Warped / high spot on the break rotor: this happened on my old Ford product, way back in the day. The brake rotor was ever so slightly off kilter that, when I would turn the wheel slightly left, the pad would touch the rotor lightly. Result: a ...


4

The first thing to check are the grounds anytime you have seemingly unrelated systems not working, working sporadically, or as I like to call it, any time you have gremlins running around in the electrical system. Looking at the ground distribution for G202 pictured below you can see that Instrument panel cluster, and the daytime running lamp module share ...


4

If it runs out of fluid it will need to be replaced, because it will destroy itself rapidly (probably preceded by a loud grinding noise). In the meantime, as long as there is sufficient gear oil to wet the gears it will be fine. As for severity, it is common for differentials to develop a "seep" around the front seal where the drive-shaft connects, or the ...


4

By far the best chemical rustbuster I have found is PB Blaster. If you don't have access to a torch or if it is in an area that heat would cause problems this is the stuff I use. The key point is patience. I spray the part and let it soak for 15-20 minutes. If it still won't turn spray it again and wrap a small piece of rag around the fitting and soak it ...


4

A good service manual will have extensive wiring diagrams and possibly troubleshooting procedures and connector locations. With that and a multimeter, you can easily track the problem down. I prefer factory service manuals over Haynes / Chilton / etc, but they're not cheap. Looks like the one you would need would be $150 from Helm. If you can verify the ...


4

It appears to be a Rostra unit their site http://www.rostra.com/rostra-support.php has an extensive support page. That is why I asked about the tail lights, they mentioned it. I would go to the site input you vehicle info and click the support tab. They will give you step by step instructions included are calibration steps, which may be your issue.


4

The fault you describe appears to be a simple matter of 'parasitic drain' on the battery. Disconnect the battery earth terminal, connect a ampmeter between the cable and the battery post. Run the ampmeter to outside of the bonnet and close the bonnet without trapping the ampmeter wires. Make sure all doors are closed, they do not have to be locked. After ...


4

Ok for the benefit of the question I will answer this. After much mucking around for quite a bit it seemed both the rear and front shocks had to be replaced, when they did the first test they just replaced the front then put the old ones back in, then swapped out the rear. They decided to swap the front again while the new rear ones were in and the ride went ...


3

You've got the right idea. Get an older common car, parts will be cheaper and there will be communities of people to help you. They're easier to work on and learn, no scan tools, not a lot of electronics. As for your grease conversion, I'm not sure that's a good place to start, especially on that car. You need good basic knowledge and experience before ...


3

Be cautious, OBD-II is not as standardized as most people think... Ford & GM both went their own ways with early OBD-II cars and industry standard "ISO only" readers won't work on them. You need tri-mode readers that also support VPW (? going from memory, I believe that's Ford's OBD-II interface) and whatever GM used. Side note, the Toyota Supra ...


3

Factory turbocharged cars typically run very little timing on the top end (high RPM/high load) - so what you're seeing via logger may most likely be correct. Additionally to further confound the issue the factory also tunes A/F to a very conservatively rich value @ WOT. Those two factors alone will make a car feel "soft" at higher RPMs. That's part of the ...


3

I think your best bet is going to be "enthusiast" groups for your specific car type. These individual sites can often offer repair and diagnostics information, to varying levels of completeness, but I have never run across a make/model agnostic site that provides similar information. Maybe this site in a few years? :-)


3

Yes, a warped lower end can affect the compression test. A seriously warped head of block can lead to compression leakage through the small space between the head gasket and the head or block. But I don't think you have a bend block, I suspect you used your old head with a new head gasket? You need to have a specialized company 'flatten' the head. I don't ...


3

The internal holes in the condenser are very small and damage to part of it will impede optimal flow. Now it sounds like the damage might not be that widespread and your AC system strong enough to handle a weakened leak. However, in your situation, I would just replace the condenser and not have to spend the time worrying about leaks. Also, I would ...


3

Apart from NoCarrier's good point about the master cylinder, the other side might also be a problem: the slave cylinder. I had an older Triumph that needed both ends fixed to finally fix the clutch. It turned out the slave cylinder walls had developed rust, which gradually wore down the seals. Having the slave re-sleeved (and new seals!) was also ...


3

Do you notice any smoke when this misfire happens?It is possible that you have a leaking injector. The injector may not be holding fuel pressure after the engine is shut off.When this occurrs with a hot engine the heat of the piston vaporizes the fuel.When the engine is cold the fuel sits in the cylinder and causes a misfire on start up until the cylinder ...


3

If you glue it you most certainly will make it unadjustable.Other options to consider are asking the bodyshop the cost of a nonpower mirror installed but not painted to match.You might also inquire about a junkyard/recycled mirror.I have found that often local auto parts stores can sell or order aftermarket parts as cheap as used parts.You could also try ...



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