Hot answers tagged

12

Number one answer is always Head Gasket. The reason is that there are oil and water passages in close proximity, being separated by a gasket (which might just be flimsy paper or rubber, but is often steel or copper) sandwiched between two pieces of metal with (usually) different thermal expansion rates. This means that any time your engine gets far enough ...


12

There are a few questions in there, so I will try to address them all. The Bueler Time Delay relays are unlike the vast majority of other relays you will find. The difference is that these relays are so-called "smart" relays. They have embedded circuitry that handles the triggering as well as the timing functions of the timed relay. For most relays (i.e. ...


10

Much of what makes wheels appear dirty is brake dust. Brake dust is wear particles from the brake pads and rotors (or from linings and drums, in the case of drum brakes). The braking effort in most vehicles is not equally distributed between front and rear wheels--this is by design. Generally the front wheels do most of the braking work, since weight ...


10

There are many leak down testers on the market. You can actually make your own with some hardware store parts and a fish tank. Operation of "most" leak down testers The procedure of operation depends on whether or not you have the cylinder head attached to the engine block or not. If the head is attached, your leak down tester should have an attachment ...


9

If it runs out of fluid it will need to be replaced, because it will destroy itself rapidly (probably preceded by a loud grinding noise). In the meantime, as long as there is sufficient gear oil to wet the gears it will be fine. As for severity, it is common for differentials to develop a "seep" around the front seal where the drive-shaft connects, or the ...


9

1. How do I operate a leak down tester? Directions differ depending on whether it's a one gage or two gage system. It basically gets down pulling a spark plug, getting that piston to Top Dead Center (TDC), threading the tester into the spark plug hole, hooking up compressed air (at a minimum pressure), bringing the cylinder pressure up to a set amount, and ...


8

I'd say there are many pros and cons for newer and older as a starter (I went older, 84 Nissan 300ZX Turbo). Newer (lets say 15 years or newer so we are talking about 1996+ which should have ODB2) Pros OEM Parts Availability More Cars in Junk Yard to pull parts from (dependent on production numbers, but still more than older models) Less wear and tear ...


8

The fact that the light bar lights up means that it works. If the fault is consistent, I'd be more tempted to look for the fault at the brake pedal - where the switch for the light is. As your existing brake lights work correctly, next step is to see whether they use the same switch, as per @Brian's comment. It may be that the LED bar has been wired in ...


8

When I looked online, here's what I found about the location of the MAP sensor in your car. As always, a picture is worth a thousand words: From looking at other info about that car it's port injected, not throttle body injected (individual injectors on each cylinder, not just one on the throttle body). As far as I know there should never be fuel in that ...


7

If buying one of the pre-assembled sets is not an option, the following answers will assume you will keep your tools in some form of carry bag... You can begin by alienating all your sockets, and sorting them. Purchase a couple of socket rails, which can be had for cheap, and snap them on. Insert these into your bag. Next, alienate your wrenches and sort ...


7

There are other factors that affect the start stop feature. I am not sure on that exact model but generally the following things will keep the car engine from shutting off: Coolant Temp too high, or too low The engine has not ran for at least two minutes The AC is on and not in the economy mode Low Vacuum Battery charge low High current draw on the 12 volt ...


7

If the picture you have attached is similar to the starter on you car, then the power to the starter motor is only delivered if the solenoid operates, so the solenoid must be working. However, the shift lever labelled in the picture, that pushes the pinion forward to engage with the flywheel may be broken, that would explain your problem. Your problem ...


7

If you are hearing the starter turn (typical starter whir), the most probable problem would be the one way clutch has gone out. It's the part of the starter with the teeth on it which engages the starter ring gear. If the solenoid has gone out, the starter motor will not spin, because the solenoid is the part which forces a large copper washer into the posts ...


7

For an A/C system to be functioning correctly, you need: In the cabin: something to exchange cold (an evaporator) something to move air over the evaporator (the fan) a working blend door that allows the user to select heat or cold In the engine compartment: something to exchange heat (a radiator) something to move air over the radiator (radiator fan) ...


6

After much deliberation on going to repair shop, I figured I would at least poke around as it could not make anything worse. Here was the problem. The negative terminal wire soldering point was loose. I fixed it this way: Unplug the LED array. (Pictures to come) Video of removal process here on youtube Remove the rear plastic shroud(with a few upward ...


6

The rubbing sound is likely a seized brake caliper. It is highly likely that the cheapest option will be to have the caliper replaced. If the car decelerates quickly, like you say, then it is not safe to drive. The brake and surrounding components will be getting hot. This could lead to a seized bearing and possible sudden failure. The heat buildup ...


6

Basic Functionality Image In order to illustrate a typical Multimeter The Multimeter is specifically a multifunction tool. By definition it combines several, well defined instruments and multiplexes the controls for simplicity. Inputs Majority of Multimeters will have 3 input terminals. Typically you will only use COM and V/mA/Ohm input (often Black ...


6

I'm not a diesel mechanic but after a quick search the number one cause of no starts on the 6.0 is lack of oil pressure. The injectors need 500psi minimum to operate. This indicates there is not sufficient high pressure oil to properly operate the injectors. There needs to be a minimum of 500 PSI ICP pressure and it should always match the desired ...


5

NOTE: the below assumes that you aren't talking about ECU-controlled cars that explicitly pull timing intentionally at high revs. In the spirit of checking the easy answers, you should check the map in the ECU. If you're looking for measurable factors, there are two critical items that might trigger detonation and, therefore, convince the engine to pull ...


5

Sounds like the clutch master cylinder is leaking. If you pump up the pedal with your foot, it might retain pressure for you to drive for a while, but after it sits, the symptoms will return. Time to replace the clutch master cylinder or check for brake line leaks.


5

If you are simply buying it to try to fix your car, and not as a tool to have, car part stores sometimes read the codes for you. The readers will usually have a description, but if not OBD-II became a government standard in 1996. The codes are basically the same accross the board, and any additional codes are manufacturer specific. To translate them, you can ...


5

I strongly support PetroEkos's suggestion of a tool bag. I'll go even further and suggest that you invest in a separate job bag: i.e., take some time before the task to reach into your (now nicely organized) selection of tools and make a good guess as to which tools you're definitely going to need. You usually won't get the inventory exactly right but ...


5

By far the best chemical rustbuster I have found is PB Blaster. If you don't have access to a torch or if it is in an area that heat would cause problems this is the stuff I use. The key point is patience. I spray the part and let it soak for 15-20 minutes. If it still won't turn spray it again and wrap a small piece of rag around the fitting and soak it ...


5

The best resource I've found, for someone mechanically inclined, is the specific Factory Service Manual for whatever car you are working on. They typically describe how to disassemble the entire car, step by step, with pictures. If you're into a more basic "Why are cars designed this way?" type of discussion. Google, or the site: howstuffworks.com is also ...


5

You asked What do these compression figures mean Response Not that much when the engine is cold. Background Based upon the information you have provided I see no indication that the rigs are bad. You aren't burning any oil You do not have oily carbon buildup on your spark plugs Bad rings will almost always give you those two symptoms, if they ...


5

OP answered his own question in the comments but is not responding. Placing the commented answer as THE answer. OP's Answer Found the problem. The air cleaner housing is electrically isolated by being mounted on rubber bushings. Pinched beneath it and chaffed is the main alternator wire and the oil pressure wire. They were shorted together. The Alt ...


5

According to the Fix-A-Flat website FAQ, it's still good once thawed: Yes, if the temperature falls below 32 degrees Fahrenheit it will freeze. The product in the can is not damaged and may be used after thawing. If the product is in the tire, and freezing weather is predicted, then immediately take the vehicle to a qualified tire professional for ...


5

The story is a bit rambling, but it sounds like your son's car has a serious electrical problem. 3 batteries behaving well for a long time, and all having problems at once is not a coincidence. Take one of your batteries to a garage (or, better, a battery shop) and have them charge and test it. It is possible to damage a car battery by overloading or ...


5

I am presuming this is a gasoline engine. If so, the symptoms sound very much like the throttle internals are dirty. If gunge builds up on the butterfly valve, it can restrict the air required for a smooth idle when the butterfly is closed, so the engine ECU needs to open the Idle Air Valve more that it thinks it should have to and you get into a cycle of ...


5

I'm unsure if it would actually pinpoint a leaking fitting/seal. Using a hand vacuum pump with a reservoir you fill the system and apply ~20inHg. Repeat until you stop seeing fluid entering the reservoir. Leave the vacuum on the system and walk away for 5 or so minutes. If pressure doesn't drop you're good. Generally if you don't see a fluid leak, look at ...



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