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0

Same thing just happened to my wife's 2005 Chrysler 300 LTD. Search a "K39 Recall". Chrysler should fix for free!! (Aug. 2015)


2

What you are experiencing is usually a sign the synchro for that gear is or is going bad. Is it worth replacing my car? Only if you can afford it. Fixing the transmission is going to be way less expensive than replacing the entire vehicle. What precautions should I take? If you need to drive it, just hold the stick in place for that ...


2

If the transmission is slipping now a rebuild will give you a slight gain in mpg. If you have the optional towing differential with a 3.92 ratio then changing to the standard 3.55 will also yield a small gain. This will hurt acceleration though, while increasing highway mileage. The biggest issue is "cost to benefit" ratio and the time to recoup those costs ...


0

"Better fuel economy and acceleration" are typically mutually exclusive. You'll gain one at the expense of the other. The easiest way to influence these is by the use of your right foot. Unless you can significantly improve the power to weight ratio of the vehicle by shedding weight. Before you go too far you might want to consider the cost of your ...


1

An impact wrench - even an electric - can do wonderful things. I just had a 10mm with a torx head that I struggled with all afternoon. It just wouldn't come, and got to where the torx teeth were pretty close to stripped out. My brother brought over his impact, and it came off in 10 secs. I have seen the light.


4

I finally dit it. I tried the penetrating fluid but with no avail. I figured I needed more torque, but did not want to damage another ratchet. So I went ahead and welded the broken rachet head and also welded a 2 foot long tube to the end of the old ratchet. With this makeshift breaker bar I managed to apply enough torque to loosen the bold.


1

Looking at the pictures, I take it the top pic is the one with the cover off (which is shown in the bottom pic). Going off this assumption, this part looks to be attached to an intermediate gear which changes the rotation so the final drive matches the rotation of the engine. It looks as though you'll need exactly the tool you described, a socket with four ...


9

It depends on the type of hybrid car you are talking about. In one type of hybrid, there will be a gasoline engine and at least one electric engine capable of driving the wheels. In this case, the gasoline engine must still use a transmission because it cannot be revved too high without causing major damage or shortened life. One possible solution to this ...


2

Two things: Ensure you are trying to turn it the right way. (ie: righty tighty [clockwise] lefty loosey [counter-clockwise]) Seeing as how the vehicle is upside down to you (since you are underneath), it's easy to get turned around and applying torque in the wrong direction. Put your combination wrench back on the nut and hit the open end with a hammer (in ...


2

I assume you have tried to spray loads of penetrating fluid on it? Otherwise, from the sound of it, I wouldn't count on getting the bolt out without heat so at this point it would be best to drop the whole oilpan so you can work on it separately. It will be messy and sucks to do but like you said it shouldn't be done with oil in there.


0

Torque converters don’t have “Dumps”. I think this person is taking about the pressure relief valve which is relieving hydraulic fluid pressure created by the transmissions hydraulic oil pump. The oil pump is driven direct from the engine. It is independent from the torque converter. The pump is working if the transmission is in any selection. So in N it is ...


2

When the car is in D and you start the engine the hydraulic pump in the automatic transmission is not providing fluid pressure until the engine starts. This fluid pressure is used to engage clutches in the transmission to engage first gear or reverse. An automatic transmission does not have gears like a manual transmission which are physically meshed into ...


0

Does your automatic transmission have a manual shift mode? Is it possible that you pushed the lever from auto mode into manual shift mode? I've never heard of a bad or missing fuse causing this, but a misplaced shift lever could cause exactly what you describe. The second thing I would do is swap the taillight fuse back where you found it to see if that ...


1

If you're confident at general mechanics, and fancy having a go, why not get hold of a second-hand transmission, swap that into the car, then have a go at rebuilding the original? That way, if you do screw it up, or it turns out to be unfixable, you're not stuck as you've got the replacement in the car...


2

While I would love to tell you to just go for it!, in the case of an automatic transmission I really cannot. It's not something the average Joe can tackle with any kind of confidence and complete successfully. Even with a good rebuild manual, it's not something you want to do uninitiated. That said, it sounds as though (besides the problem with the vacuum ...


1

Agree with @mac & @ChrisMcKeown ... one of your sensors is telling your computer one of your wheels has stopped spinning and therefor is activating the traction control. Figuring out which wheel sensor is bad will be tough to figure out. If you don't have the right diagnostic equipment available to you, it will require a trip to the mechanic to get it ...


0

CV joints will clack. Wheel bearings will grind, often only in one direction. CV joints will also have lash.


3

I'm not sure this is a simple as # number fluid changes to get to x dilution factor. If so M1V1 = M2V2 is what you would be looking for which looks to be around 140L worth of oil changes. It's my understanding that this transmission is expecting an actual flush procedure where either the transmission pump is forcing the old fluid out or there's a ...



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