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No, Not at all. Someone said here this: "You lose the added benefit of engine braking if the car's not in gear" Not true for automatic gears. Transmission still will allow the power from engine to go to wheels. Putting in Neutral will cut the power immediately and shorten the distance you need to come to a full stop. Try stopping from 40 mph with and ...


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I've got a NP241OR on my Wrangler, and would never downgrade myself (4:1 ratio, significantly stronger than the other t-cases), but yes you can mount a NV231 or NP242 with no modifications to: Chassis supports and general shape of the T-box (the swap should not be immediately apparent). However, the inputs/outputs of transfer cases are easily swappable, ...


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A friend of mine recently had a similar issue on his 18,000 mile Ford C-Max, attributed to a failed hydraulic cylinder which then emptied fluid all over the clutch thus ruining it. I wonder if there is a hydraulic problem with these cars that Ford aren't talking about.


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The A/C system has a pressure sensor built in, so the A/C compressor wont run without refrigerant in the system. Therefore there is no problem driving the car.


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Sounds like a decent plan of attack. The post-work actions should really be: leak test evacuate the system recharge with refrigerant


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The phenomenon is called as hitting "False Neutral" while shifting. Basically when the clutch is not able to engage the selected gear properly the drive shaft stays in the mode of stasis . i.e simulating the effect of the bike being in neutral. The only difference between a regular neutral and this one is that you don't see the neutral light on the dash. ...


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I've had this on a few bikes and it can happen for a few reasons. If it it's only happened a couple of times i wouldn't be too worried. I've had a 'false neutral' when changing gears and instead of engaging the next gear the gears don't quite engage and you end up between them. Older bikes with higher mileage might be more prone to this. To avoid it I've ...


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If the bell housings are removable, you can swap them. You may need to drill/weld a bit to get holes to line up. If they are not removable you will need to either make an adaptor plate, or cut/weld the bell housing to fit.


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Having driven a bus with a non-synchro gearbox and a wet clutch, I understand the meaning behind "stuck in neutral" - for if you didn't slide it into first before coming to a halt, there was no getting it into first without suffering the embarrassment of shutting down the engine. The habit dies hard; synchro or not, I still hold at a light in first gear, ...


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This is one of the supports for the transmission. On a Cherokee (Jeep XJ), the engine, clutch, gearbox and transfer case form a complete assembly that goes inline from front to rear. Needless to say, this is quite long and needs some support points to bear the weight. Even if this is just one support point among many (and the others can hold things in ...


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It's hard to tell without seeing what else it's connected to. However if I had to guess, it looks like a portion of your subframe. A subframe is a piece of metal that typically stretches from one side of your car to the other and is bolted to the actual frame of your car. Its task is to support the weight of your engine and transmission. Although I can't ...


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Looked at it with my father-in-law and he says it's the rear transmission mount. Also turns out it's rubber, not metal (didn't think to check that because I'm an idiot). He said it's not a huge deal that it's torn, but obviously it would be better if I replaced it. It's a cheap part and shouldn't he a huge deal to fix. I reckon I can just put a jack stand ...


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As I stated in my comment, if you are able to safely let the car idle i.e. the problem isn't your headgasket, ringlands or a burst radiator, you can tow the car with the engine running and someone behind the wheel. From a mechanical perspective this is no different than coasting. I believe the danger with towing the car with the wheels down is that you don't ...


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You can dinghy tow an Outback or Forester behind a motorhome if these conditions are satisfied: The Subaru is a Manual Transmission model; No automatic transmission subaru should ever be dinghy towed with wheels down! Use the gray "Valet" key to unlock the steering wheel. This is the first click past the "OFF" position. In this position, the steering wheel ...


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Same thing just happened to my wife's 2005 Chrysler 300 LTD. Search a "K39 Recall". Chrysler should fix for free!! (Aug. 2015)


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What you are experiencing is usually a sign the synchro for that gear is or is going bad. Is it worth replacing my car? Only if you can afford it. Fixing the transmission is going to be way less expensive than replacing the entire vehicle. What precautions should I take? If you need to drive it, just hold the stick in place for that ...


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If the transmission is slipping now a rebuild will give you a slight gain in mpg. If you have the optional towing differential with a 3.92 ratio then changing to the standard 3.55 will also yield a small gain. This will hurt acceleration though, while increasing highway mileage. The biggest issue is "cost to benefit" ratio and the time to recoup those costs ...


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"Better fuel economy and acceleration" are typically mutually exclusive. You'll gain one at the expense of the other. The easiest way to influence these is by the use of your right foot. Unless you can significantly improve the power to weight ratio of the vehicle by shedding weight. Before you go too far you might want to consider the cost of your ...


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An impact wrench - even an electric - can do wonderful things. I just had a 10mm with a torx head that I struggled with all afternoon. It just wouldn't come, and got to where the torx teeth were pretty close to stripped out. My brother brought over his impact, and it came off in 10 secs. I have seen the light.



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