New answers tagged

1

If one of your auto transmission clutches is burnt, then the clutch will not be working, therefore at least one of your 'gears' will not work. A symptom would be that your engine would rev high, but you wouldn't be able to go any faster. Being limited to 20 MPH certainly sounds like a it could be a burnt clutch. @Robert S. Barnes is correct that the ...


2

If you have a "burnt up" transmission, you are likely to see that your transmission fluid is a very dark color instead of pink, and may feel gritty if you rub it between your fingers, and may also have a "burnt" smell if you smell it.


1

You can try and get the transmission flushed and might get a few more thousand miles out of it, but from the sounds of it, your tranny is toast. It will either need a rebuild or a swapped out for a new/rebuilt one. What is happening is the soft parts of the transmission (bands/clutches) are worn out. They no longer have any grip to give you the momentum. ...


2

Friction etc. Think of all the moving parts in a engine: It already costs power to move Pistons, valves, shafts and belts due to friction. The dependency between RPM and this power is not linear, if you increase the RPM by a factor of 2, the power usually increases by a factor larger than 2. The aggregates consume power, too, and it's also said that the ...


0

I'm not aware of any such formula. The biggest factor at play is the engine rpm, but there are a zillion little things that affect the engine's internal friction, and engineers have been working their asses off for decades to reduce this friction by tiny amounts. Any "coefficient of braking" or whatever would have to be an empirically measured number. When ...


1

I love engine braking, but it's always been a bit of a mystery to me how it works. Reading up on it, it seems that: When you close the throttle (let go of the gas), this obviously closes the throttle plate, cutting off the air supply to the engine The cutoff air supply causes a small vacuum The engine's intake valves still open when they are supposed to, ...


2

Sounds like there's a few things going on, and the comments are all over the place. They're all good though! :) Here's what you need to do. 1 - Check engine light is on: The computer is trying to tell you what's wrong. Get the code read by the shop and post back here. 2 - Car quietly not starting: As has been suggested by others, this is most likely the "...


0

Hi everyone here give you very good advice If your car drive and park then no cranking . First try to start in Neutral If it starts Then you have a bad Neutral Start Switch .


1

I sounds like the switch on the automatic transmission has failed. This tells the car what gear mode is selected and the car will only start if it's receiving the signal it's expecting. I would be surprised if the whole transmission has failed, it definitely sounds like an electrical / electronic fault. If your mechanic insists the whole transmission has ...


2

Hard to say exactly what is it, but I would troubleshoot using a stethoscope. Have someone sit in the car, set the emergency brake, hold the brakes, and put it in drive. Might want to block the tires too just to be extra sure. The stethoscope will allow you to find the exact location of the sound. Look around the intake hoses, throttle body, intake ...


0

The mechanic disassembled the gearbox and there was a minor damage in a piston which controls CVT pulleys. When the piston was replaced, the problem got resolved.


-1

Hi your forward drum Clutches burn . You have to change piston, steel Clutch etc.


0

I afraid you will have to take your clutch cover off. Check your oil level before draining an oil, then drain it, and take a clutch cover off. Before that make sure you have a new clutch cover gasket and new oil. Something wears out in there, and as a bike engine it has an engine, clutch, and a gearbox all in one case, lubes with same oil, and bike engine is ...


0

There should be a switch the Neutral Safety Switch (NSS) and reverse switch located at the shifter in the center console.


3

The parking pawl is designed to shear; that piece might be floating around and causing trouble. The parking pawl system is also designed to ratchet until the output drum external teeth slow enough to engage. While it's not good practice to shift into park while moving, I am not ready to doomspeak your transmission as blown, or even needing an overhaul. ...


0

Usually when things make a boom sound they are not happy campers. Jamming it into park at 20 mph would definitely damage or destroy quite a few things in the transmission. Is your transmission blown? - Yes 2 options available: Major overhaul on the transmission. Replace the transmission Replacing the transmission would probably be cheaper. Check ...


1

In Russia many pro drivers and just experienced drivers brake with transmission by shifting to lower gear in speed and letting go clutch fast no problem.


1

Subaru states that the Forester is primarily a passenger car, and not built for continual towing. But you should be fine with occasional use. Here's the owners manual section related to towing. Look at page 8-19 (http://techinfo.subaru.com/proxy/69506/pdf/ownerManual/069506_2008_Forester/MSA5M0803A_14.pdf). Several tips in there about towing in general, ...


0

The towing capacity of a 2008 Subaru forester with the 2.5l engine is apparently ~1374Kg at worst (or ~2700lb). As long as the trailer you are towing clocks under this (which I assume it will with quite significant margins) you will be fine. reference here If you don't trust that source, if you still have the operators manual or can get hold of one that ...


3

The fact of the matter is any additional load is harder on a transmission. Stuffing 5 of me in four car is 1000 lbs, add say camping gear and you're looking at 1200-1500 lbs of cargo. If my wife were driving alone that'd be less than 120 lbs of carve weight. Over time the difference of just my wife vs 5 of me could be huge, but we're talking over the life of ...


13

It's not too clear which part you're referring to, so I've annotated your image with the most likely items.


0

Not positive how it is set up on your vehicle, but here is where I would look. Go under the hood, find the steering column. There should be a tube around the column with linkage that goes down to the transmission. There should be a piece with raised pieces to help you not accidentally shift out of park. Around here somewhere should be a spring that holds ...


2

On the racing car - Upshift cuts the ignition, Downshift blips the throttle. Details: instead of gear stick they have paddle shift. It is a actuator attached to a gear selector and being pushed or pulled by compressed air or solenoid. Compressed air comes from a little compressor mounted on a car. When you switch gears up you send a signal to ECU which is ...


1

If it starts lovely and doesn't stop, then it'll be too rich air/fuel mix, which means choke or air filter issue. If it is difficult to start, it overheats, or just stops for no reason, it'll be a dirty carb (main jet) or an air leak between a carb and head. Check any rubber cracks, gaskets, any 'oily' areas.. If not, I'd change a spark plug lead. But it ...


1

Check the float chamber and inlet filter on the carb fuel inlet, and have a look at the manifold to carb connection for an air leak.


2

There are a few things for you to look for First - A low battery can initiate misfires as your ignition system will require 12.6 volts or under load the spark will not have the required electrical power to jump the gap of the sparkplugs under high-load/resistance situations. Your battery could be getting a lift while charging at certain RPM's which is why ...


3

The first answer is good and rather complete, and I would have added this as a comment if I had the reputation... It might help to understand how a motorcycle gearbox differs from the traditional design that you will see in most explanations. The gears in a motorcycle gearbox do not slide on the shafts to engage and disengage gears, the gears are constantly ...


9

Why the Quick-Shifter? Since these are called quick-shifters we'll dub slow-shifting the traditional way of shifting gear. When you slow-shift you usually close the throttle, disengage the clutch, act on the gear shifting pedal, engage the clutch and reopen the throttle. Now, this is a time-consuming process (a few hundreds of milliseconds) which might be ...



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