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Not positive how it is set up on your vehicle, but here is where I would look. Go under the hood, find the steering column. There should be a tube around the column with linkage that goes down to the transmission. There should be a piece with raised pieces to help you not accidentally shift out of park. Around here somewhere should be a spring that holds ...


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On the racing car - Upshift cuts the ignition, Downshift blips the throttle. Details: instead of gear stick they have paddle shift. It is a actuator attached to a gear selector and being pushed or pulled by compressed air or solenoid. Compressed air comes from a little compressor mounted on a car. When you switch gears up you send a signal to ECU which is ...


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If it starts lovely and doesn't stop, then it'll be too rich air/fuel mix, which means choke or air filter issue. If it is difficult to start, it overheats, or just stops for no reason, it'll be a dirty carb (main jet) or an air leak between a carb and head. Check any rubber cracks, gaskets, any 'oily' areas.. If not, I'd change a spark plug lead. But it ...


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Check the float chamber and inlet filter on the carb fuel inlet, and have a look at the manifold to carb connection for an air leak.


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There are a few things for you to look for First - A low battery can initiate misfires as your ignition system will require 12.6 volts or under load the spark will not have the required electrical power to jump the gap of the sparkplug under high-load/resistance situations. Your battery could be getting a lift while charging at certain RPM's which is why ...


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The first answer is good and rather complete, and I would have added this as a comment if I had the reputation... It might help to understand how a motorcycle gearbox differs from the traditional design that you will see in most explanations. The gears in a motorcycle gearbox do not slide on the shafts to engage and disengage gears, the gears are constantly ...


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Why the Quick-Shifter? Since these are called quick-shifters we'll dub slow-shifting the traditional way of shifting gear. When you slow-shift you usually close the throttle, disengage the clutch, act on the gear shifting pedal, engage the clutch and reopen the throttle. Now, this is a time-consuming process (a few hundreds of milliseconds) which might be ...


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Synchronizers are friction devices. They are most commonly made out of brass although other materials may be used. Brass is a soft metal and as it wears down the power it produces would not damage other components. The synchronizer resembles two cones that fit one inside the other. One cone is attached to the blocking ring and the other to the gear train. ...


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I'm betting that the cable responsible for front-back shifting has either come loose at a mounting point (transmission or shift lever) or has broken completely. You may be able to have someone operate the lever while you observe the heavy cables on the top of the transmission bell housing. It's also possible that a bracket that holds one of the two cables ...


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The symptoms of a bad throwout bearing are (usually) noise with the clutch disengaged, which goes away when the clutch is pressed in. You were getting the exact opposite, which indicates that you're suffering input shaft wear, which is common on 5MT Subaru transmissions. With input shaft wear, the shaft gets a little bit smaller over time, but the throw-...


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Sounds like the shift linkage is loose or partially broken. Lift the car up and look at where the linkage connects to the transmission. I've seen where the brackets rot causing similar complaints.


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The transmission and its control systems will not be damaged by this practice. Safety could be compromised if the shifter is left in this position. The park lock will not be engaged so the vehicle could roll away. This is a system internal to the transmission that is a back-up to the parking brake. It is important to move the shifter back to the P position ...


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Even Before we begin I would assert that you immedieatly address the issue , its extremely Dangerous to drive a transmission that has the slippage issue. Causes: 1. Low Transmission Fluid: While this cannot be 100% attributed to the issue , this can also be a factor for a high mileage vehicle, normally manuals dont need as much maintainence for upto like ...


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Likely to be a worn 5th gear synchronizer. Replacement can be quite expensive as the gearbox will need to be removed, then stripped for the synchronizer to be replaced. Normally as the gearbox will be removed its a good time to replace the clutch too if its not been replaced already.


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I'll answer this old question with very recent experience, as in still in the process of fixing a transmission to broke. I had the transmission on my one and only car fail catastrophically. The differential broke and took out the ring gear it sits inside of. Aside from that and a couple minor things I found during the rebuild it was still a very healthy ...


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I'm not convinced it's as simple as that formula. I think you've got three solid bodies involved in the conversation. If it were me, I'd design the system in SolidWorks, then put the pieces together with centerlines and contact surfaces mating. Part of the issue here is ID/OD and axial clearance / slop. Its not much in real life, but enough to be a factor ...



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