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0

If you're only considering top speed and not acceleration then the number of gears don't matter. The only thing that matters for top speed is aerodynamics and the power to overcome wind resistance.


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Apart from the other answers, it does happen that transmissions are not fully rebuilt. There are degrees of cost/effort. It is very common for parts to be re-used. Planetary gears, solenoids are often re-used. "Steels"/clutch pack discs are replaced. The "hard parts" (gears) may add thousands to the cost but will reduce noise considerably.


3

The question as asked has no real answer, so let me explain a few topics that will point you in the right direction. The number of gears has no effect on top speed. The ratio of each gear is the important part. You could conceivably have a 3-speed transmission with a higher top speed (for a given RPM) than a 7-speed transmission. Having more gears can ...


3

It depends There are too many other variables such as: Wind resistance at top speed of the vehicles Loss of power through the various components from the engine to the rear wheel Gear ratios We can get some of this information, such as gear ratios, but the other components necessary are beyond our reach. I don't believe your question can truly be ...


4

I know that this is an old question, but I want to provide a brief answer. Amount of work that is necessary to fix anything inside the transmission is very close to the amount of work that is necessary to do the rebuild (on average). Your average Rebuild = replace friction plates, and replace rubber seals (sometimes they come only in a kit) + replace and ...


1

The first thing that I would check for is a vacuum leak. Vacuum hoses rot over time making this is a common cause of engine speed problems at idle. Carefully examine all of the boots and hoses connected to your intake manifold.


4

If the engine stops while in gear (and brakes not pressed) it IS still possible for the vehicle to roll or continue rolling. Brakes will require additional foot pressure to maintain the same amount of braking power. If moving: The wheels will continue to rotate, however on some vehicles it will create an 'engine braking' effect and the resistance of the ...


0

http://transmissionrepairguy.com/transmission-solenoid/ There are 6 solenoids in a automatic transmission (from the transmission guy repair website) Torque convertor clutch solenoid, 2-3 upshift,3-2 downshift, 1-2 upshift, pressure control, Torque convertor clutch pulse width modulation solenoid valve. Transmission Solenoid: Function & Common ...


2

I think you are misunderstanding the reading on the stick. The Hot mark doesn't mean the fluid is overly hot... That is the full mark when the fluid is hot (which is normal). Transmissions are supposed to be checked after the engine is up to temperature and has been driving a while.


2

Reading hot on the transmission dipstick after driving is normal. As to the ABS light they could of damaged wiring while doing the brakes but it's unlikely. Reading ABS codes requires a scantool capable of talking to the ABS computer.


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I prefer large wooden blocks to jack stands, A safety issue. the alignment is solved by the use of a bull prick or a large phillips screwdriver for bolts installment. the rubber mounts wear out and shear. change all of them. lube the bolts with small amount of grease, the mounts wd-40. wire brush all mounting points. davez


2

This can be made to work well. As a teenager I tried the technique seen from Mad Max, with an old rear wheel drive car. While travelling forward at speed, press the clutch fully in, allow the engine revs to drop so no load on gears. Then change into reverse, raise the revs to a high level (thinking nearly red-line) and dump the clutch. As long as you keep ...


2

More than likely the shifter hasn't brought the transmission completely into drive. It is physically between the neutral and drive positions. I've seen this happen in my vehicle and it will not engage the gear. A simple remedy of shifting the lever back up fully into neutral, then back down into drive usually brings it fully into gear. If this does not ...


1

Yes and no. Yes the engine would in theory be forced to rotate in reverse. No in practice because the extreme torque shock would simply strip the clutch shaft splines or even completely screw the shaft in two. Please don't try this at home...


4

It won't damage your transmission unless it damages your transmission You have a shift drum. It has grooves in it around the outside diameter that the shift forks follow to slide gears into gear as the drum turns. This is the basis for a constant mesh transmission. It's the reason (other than regulatory) that motorcycles gears are shifted in numerical ...


4

A High School auto shop teacher about 35 years as an experiment on a old shop car managed to do precisely that. Got the old car to 60+ MPH and slammed into reverse--suffice it to say it was not pretty. Idler shaft milled like a lathe, the gears....you don't wanna know...LOL


3

I don't have experience on as many different bikes as some people, but here's what I have found. But "preloading" the shifter, were talking about pressing on it just a little before you are ready to shift. The force needed from bike to bike will vary, so it's something you will just have to try and figure out. A motorcycle transmission is not like a ...


3

Could the wiring harness problem have a relation to the acceleration problem? Possibly, if it is an electronic transmission Is it possible to check transmission fluid level in my car? Not familiar with that model but some can only be checked if the vehicle is on a lift, manufacturers have started removing the usual transmission dip sticks and ...



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