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6

First is to soak them with a good penetrating oil like Liquid Wrench, PB Blaster or Sea Foam. If you have access to an impact wrench, electric might work but pneumatics tend to have more torque. If you don't own one consider renting one or purchasing one from a store with a liberal return policy. If that is out of the question slide a pipe, crow bar, large ...


5

Here is a diagram for the basic 4 wire trailer. Yellow - Left Stop/Turn (the big filament as you described in the left bulb) Green - Right Stop/Turn (the big filament as you described in the right bulb) Brown - Parking/Marker lights (the small filament as you described in both the right and left side bulbs) White - Ground They all hook to the ...


4

Many older cars with a tow ball had no electrical outlet - back in the day regulations weren't as strict on adding lights to trailers etc. Many modern cars either have an outlet, or have a factory option for adding one. Typically, Camry's from about 97 or 98 have a panel you need to remove inside the trunk. This does vary a bit between versions, but this ...


3

The following applies to wiring basic rear lights for an un-braked trailer. Wiring up tow-bar electrics is fairly simple if you have a few tools, even if the car doesn't have a connector specifically for a tow-bar connection. You need not know the colour scheme of the car's wiring either. Each pin on the tow-ball plug goes directly to the positive wire ...


2

It depends on the size of the spindle and whether it is a straight spindle or not (more than likely it is straight). There are two common sizes for small trailers (I believe). It should be the A14 bearing set for the 1" spindle, or A6 set for the 1 1/4" spindle. If in the US, you should be able to pick these up from any of the major parts stores (AutoZone, ...


2

When you install a new connector, coat the exposed metal surfaces with dielectric silicone grease. This will keep out moisture and slow corrosion. You can also just squirt the stuff in to the connector. It might be messy, but things will still work fine.


1

You need to look at the maximum rated towing weight for the car - this is the weight that car car can pull, and stop, safely (though not necessarily quickly or economically). I don't know about the US, but all manufacturers selling cars in the EU are required to calculate this, and stamp it on the VIN plate. This weight needs to be more than the maximum ...


1

Get a Diesel pickup. They're much nicer these days than they were 20 years ago. Or something with at least a V6 engine and RWD.


1

What's the tongue weight on that box trailer when it's loaded? From the configuration, I'm betting it's pretty seriously heavy. Might even be a chore to lift the tongue by hand when it's empty. Assuming that's the case, I'd lean pretty hard towards either a half-ton pickup or a full-sized van. I've towed a horse trailer configured like that box trailer ...


1

Nice list you've put together so far. If you don't tow often, double-check the registration on the plate. Inspect Trailer Tie-Down Locking Mechanism, and Materials. You're looking for cranks that physically won't turn (due to rust), worn straps due to friction or chafing, or broken hooks or loops on the object being towed. Are your wheels self-greasing? Do ...


1

I haven't used one of these, so I can't speak from personal experience, but this connector looks promising. I found a review of the connector, I have no idea how independent it is, but it goes into the build details.



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