New answers tagged

2

Yes, you can - but make sure you get all the bits that are needed to attach it to the car. Assuming it's an OEM towbar, the mounting points on the chassis should already be present, but you'll probably need bolts, brackets etc from the donor car. You'll also need the full wiring harness including any internal plugs etc that attach it to the car's wiring ...


5

The height from the ground to the bottom of the ball will be determined by the trailer you're pulling, not the car. The height of the trailer is such that the trailers hitch is horizontal with the ground, while the hitch receiver on all vehicles is attached to two points on the frame of the car, so the receiver height is fixed for the car - e.g my Subaru ...


4

There has been a lot of good information shared here, especially by Lawrence Wade (from my perspective). But we're slightly left hanging about the two closely-related fundamental questions from the OP: Will higher octane fuel, increase power while towing? and Will higher octane fuel impact the available power in common v-6 regular gas burning ...


3

A lot of people get confused with octane ratings. The octane rating is the fuels resistance to detonation, ie, the fuel / air mix igniting just due to pressure. When this happens the resulting burn is very violent and can easily cause major engine damage. When the fuel / air mix burns normally it pushes down progressively on the piston; when detonation ...


5

... As the air gets thinner at higher altitudes, your air/fuel ratio is going try to stay the same (emissions, performance, fuel efficency) if you're under the control of the ECU in closed loop mode. Consider the Mass Airflow Sensor, which detects the total mass (not volume!) of air entering the engine by a hot wire resistance sensor. Note that I have no ...


6

Two great comments already; couple of things to add. The reason why we have Octane types is because the lower-octane fuels tend to ignite at lower temperatures (ie. hot metal parts inside the combustion chamber, rather than the spark plug firing) or lower compression pressures (ie. the compression fires the engine like a diesel engine works). The octane ...


6

Engine control systems in typical cars do not generally change the spark advance to add more than expected, the engine is designed to run at a particular efficiency for a given octane, so changing it from whats specified by the manufacturer isn't a good idea. If there is sub optimal conditions and the engine management detects a problem, fuel mix or knock ...


16

That is a great question. I believe the true answer here is "it depends". Like so many other things you can do with your vehicle, if your vehicle cannot use the higher octane fuel, it won't benefit from it. Something to remember about octane ratings is, the higher number does not mean it is more energy dense. The higher number indicates the fuel is actually ...



Top 50 recent answers are included