New answers tagged

1

It is unlikely you tightened them to the point of causing some damage. The paperwork that comes with the parts should have a reference to torque specs. An on line reference I found gives a value of 37ftlbs. As far as grease I use the chassis grease from the auto parts store. I generally give them a shot of grease prior to installation. I do this mostly to ...


3

When getting new oil/tires rotated at your dealer make sure you check the lugs on all tires. Mechanics like to use a torque stick to secure lugs. This device fits on the end of an air driver—the loud whoosh noise heard in repair shops—most shops have a stick set that goes from 40lb-100lb and are color coded for different torque strengths. Sometimes a tech ...


0

So it sounds like VW uses three different kinds of "always replace" bolts: Torque-to-yield (TTY or T2Y) bolts which must be replaced because they are engineered for one-time use. Reuse of these is risking failure, Bolts treated for corrosion resistance (often with a green color), these are being replaced to ensure that the corrosion resistance is not ...


4

If you fear that the nut or bolt are seized, and you don't want to damage the part it's attached to with excessive force, you would use a torque wrench to warn you that you are exceeding the torque which might result in breaking the bolt/stud or otherwise damaging the fastener. It's also useful if you know the fastener will take the force, but for whatever ...


4

Another consideration is because a torque wrench looks/acts like a breaker bar, it's tempting to use it to loosen nuts/bolts


4

Another, somewhat different consideration, is that "clockwise only" torque wrenches are not suitable for left-hand threads – in case that matters to you. Of course tightening a left-hand thread is the same as loosening a right-hand one. Beam type (scale and pointer) torque wrenches are reliable and inexpensive and all of the ones I've seen will work in ...


20

Sometimes you want to measure breakaway torque. This can tell you if a fastener has started to loosen due to vibration, or was over-torqued and the bolt/stud may have stretched or weakened, or the fastener was cross-threaded and need to be replaced. Note that breakaway torque values will often be higher than the stated torque spec, as the breakaway torque ...


3

The actual reason to replace the bolts isn't specifically the bolts, it's the nuts. These are self locking (i.e. Nyloc) style nuts and after they've been removed and refitted, you can't be sure that they'll self-lock effectively. When purchasing a new balljoint, replacements for these are almost always provided. Your local dealership should charge you no ...


4

The other question I'd love an answer to is why are the bolts "always replace." Does the torquing process (20 Nm + 90º) weaken the bolt, or is it not reproducible? Or something else altogether? For a conventional bolt, ignoring the torque required to overcome friction when you tighten it, there is a linear relation between the amount of torque and the ...


16

If that would be possible, every 3-year old could fasten the bolt. He just has to try 100 times with 0.5lb-ft. You have to apply the full 50lb-ft, regardless of the torque applied before!


7

I cannot tell you directly if the bolts you are using are Torque to Yield (TTY or T2Y) bolts, but if Bently says to replace them, you bet I'd do it. What are three bolts in comparison to the well being of your family and yourself, not to mention those around you should any of these bolts fail? As for T2Y bolts, here is what Fel-Pro says about them: T-T-...



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