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8

TL;DR The problem you are encountering is the limited resolution of your speed plus fluctuation plus slightly different approaches to calculate power. And finally, you have to think about the term power at wheels. What exactly is power at wheels? I would say, this is the tangential force applied by the wheels onto the street (i.e. the force that's pushing ...


4

Having a 1/2" drive 8mm socket will get in your way more than it will prove useful. The rim of the socket that fits on the bolt will be too think for you to fit onto an 8mm bolt head time and time again. Perhaps you don't wrench on smaller engines very much, then you won't run into issues as often. If you encountered this clutch cover that size socket ...


8

If you have to start somewhere and need a complete set to do your job, having the 1/2" drive go down to the 8mm size helps you to do this without having to buy the smaller set. If you can get the complete job done with a single set of sockets, you won't need to get the 3/8" and 1/4" drive sets yet. When working professionally, having the different sized ...


5

Convenience, mainly! Lots of small parts such as covers are held on with small bolts, and it means you can cover the full range of useful sizes with just one set, should you so wish.


2

I would strongly advise against using a 1/2" torque wrench with 1/2->3/8 and 3/8->1/4 adaptors, particularly in the range you are suggesting. 1/4" drive adaptors are weak, and I think you'll struggle to find any that can take 200NM of torque without twisting (or failing completely). I would recommend picking up a rail of 1/2" drive sockets when you get the ...


1

Torque is twisting force, if the adapter has some flex to it then torque would be reduced, similar to the torque you loose on a long ratchet extension bar. A short adapter like in your question would have little or no twist or reduce the torque.


14

No, it won't reduce the torque. Torque is equivalent to radius x force. As long as A, the force is applied at the same distance from the nut/bolt that you're tightening and B, it's applied in the same direction then you'll be applying the same torque. An adapter (especially so short) shouldn't have a noticeable effect on the direction that you're applying ...


5

Two things to watch out for when using these equations Consistency of units If your mass is in kg, speed in km/h and acceleration in furlongs per week², you're not going to get power in horsepower. Your safest bet is to convert all units to SI metric and convert to hp as a final step. 1000 hp = 746 W Factor in rotational inertia A rule of thumb is to ...



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