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14

Does this mod ever give a measurable increase in power? tl;dr: yes, sometimes it works well. But... Your picture is a good illustration of some of the problems with just saying "cold air intake" and expecting that to mean the same thing to all people. Let's break down the pieces of the puzzle and talk about how those might help or hurt: Filter: ...


10

There's an app for that! Basically if you can constantly measure the acceleration of your car, you can calculate horsepower and torque. I know I have seen advertisements in car magazines in the past for devices you would sick to the windshield, but since smartphones are so widespread and have such advanced accelerometers, Apps have taken over. I don't ...


8

Until the engine starts the only thing applying torque to the drive train is the starter motor, the engine itself is not providing any torque. Starting like this will not cause any damage to the drive train (except perhaps the teeth on the edge of the flywheel that the starter motor engages with) but it does put excessive load on the starter motor and it's ...


8

Horsepower is how much power the engine can produce (how much work is done in a given time), wheras torque is the amount of turning force it can make (how much work is done). The two are quite intricately linked, so you can't have one without the other. You'll need to think of a few physics equations: Force = Mass x Acceleration Power = Work Done ...


7

The point is to feel like you've done something cool to your car and freed it from the shackles of The Man/the OEM intake. The primary benefit of Cold Air Intakes is to the bank account of the kit manufacturer, the secondary benefit is your car making a nicer noise, if you like the sound of an aftermarket intake. There's been a few debunkings of CAIs over ...


7

It depends. Just because an intake can flow more air mass doesn't guarantee that the engine will utilize it. The intake is part of a system of components. The engine produces power by managing air flow into and out of the combustion chamber. There are usually other actors involved: Intake side. Carburetors, throttle bodies, intake manifolds, intake ...


6

90° = quarter turn. 180° = half turn. It's alright if you are off a few degrees. I typically start with the breaker bar perpendicular (straight out) and do quarter turns, or have it straight off to the left. Just keep yourself parallel or perpendicular to where you start. DO NOT USE A TORQUE WRENCH. It's bad for the torque wrench to turn after its ...


5

Most oil filters have instructions for tightness printed on them, and they normally read like: Tighten by hand until base contact, and then tighten an additional 1/4 turn. I don't recall ever seeing torque mentioned, because the filter housing relies on the rubber o-ring seal rather than mechanical tightness to seal in the oil. Too much torque will ...


5

I think I got this. someone help me verify... So I watch the tach and speedo to determine MPH per 1000 RPM in higher gears (3rd,4th,5th). On my car its about 10, 15, 19.5. [tire diameter (in inches)] * [pi] * [1/(gear ratio * final drive ratio)] / [in/ft] / [ft/mi] * [RPM] * [min/hr] = MPH constants pi = 3.14159 in/ft = 12 ft/mi = 5280 min/hr = 60 ...


5

The basics are quite simple. The motor generates a certain torque N and a certain power P at a given RPM. Further more, the relation between power and torque is: P = C * N * RPM where C is a constant to convert all that odd units. For N, P in SI units, it is C = pi / 30 Neglecting any losses, Power is conserved from the motor to the wheels so you ...


5

Torque is the amount of force exerted by your engine at a particular RPM. In two cars with equal gearing and in the same gear, a car making twice as much torque will accelerate exactly twice as fast. Horsepower is calculated from torque and RPM. A given amount of torque at a low RPM equals less horsepower than the same amount of torque at a higher RPM. ...


4

The engine torque produced is a function of the amount of air ingested and the air/fuel ratio combusted in the cylinder(s), combined with 'static' variables like the compression ratio, bore/stroke, crankshaft design, intake length, cam profile, intake and exhaust sizing, etc. With all the other parameters now static (non-variable) once the engine is built ...


4

This is a great vehicle dynamics question that essentially has two parts to it: Is the motor able to hit top speed, 120 mph? Is the torque enough to accelerate it to top speed within 5 seconds? The motor in question Power : 1000 W (~ 1.36 hp) Speed : 3200 RPM Torque : 1.91 Nm Something interesting to note here is the apparent discrepancy between ...


4

There are not calculations. The car has a list of PIDs that the tool checks. The readiness monitors are a set of tests that the car runs including but not limited to EVAP, EGR, CATALIST, O2, FUEL, COMPREHENSIVE. When the codes in a car are cleared all the PID values for the monitors are cleared. As the car completes and passes the necessary tests it will ...


4

Theoretically yes, practically it's not that easy. Line pressure is just one of the components that contribute to the torque capacity of the transmission. First, it's not the speed of the application of a clutch but the holding strength once the clutch is applied that contributes to strength. In this respect higher line pressure will give higher torque ...


4

Almost never? Mainly because they're really a 'hot air intake system'. This is especially true for cars using forced injection due to the high under-hood temperatures. If you want to reduce intake restriction look into a less restrictive 'panel' filter like a K&N. Even then, it really only matters if your car is intake (vs exhaust) limited and your ECU ...


3

The working cycle of an 4 stroke internal combustion engine is like: (1) Inlet of the fresh air (2) Compression (3) Working Cycle - expansion (4) Exhaust Cooler intake air is especially beneficial for part (1). Since cooler air has a higher density, it means that the gas velocities at the inlet are lower. Therefore lower pressure losses at the cylinder. ...


3

I'm taking my information from two sources, this Digital Trends article and the good old Engineering Explained video. Digital Trends explains it as: How this differs from a standard differential is that, where as a basic mechanical diff spins the outer wheel faster than the inner wheel (it has longer to travel), the TVD in the RC F employs electronic ...


3

Torque the bolt to the required torque. Then mark the head of the bolt with a marker or pen. This way you can visually check the angle. This is commonly used to ensure bolts are torqued during assembly.


3

I'm going to buck the other two answers and tell you DO IT RIGHT OR DON'T DO IT. It is very important to torque your head bolts correctly. The actual preferred method for attaining the proper torque is by figuring out the fastener stretch, not by using a torque wrench. When torquing, you are applying a clamping load on the object you are torquing. You can ...


3

Torque in a motorcycle The piston moves up and down, and the force for that comes from the fuel that is burned. Connected to the piston is a rod, the connecting rod, and that rod is connected (with the ability to turn) to the crankshaft. The distance between the pedal to the rotation point is comparable to the distance between the crank and the middle ...


3

horsepower = (torque * RPM) / 5252 always. Typically engines have to suck in their air and fuel so they can only suck in an optimal amount in a certain range. With a turbo you are forcing the air in, so the engine can make more torque over a wider range. If there is a max torque the manufacturer wants to set (for torque limit on the ...


3

I didn't see anyone mention it but I believe any increase in power would only be at wide-open throttle (WOT). So if you are racing or really aggressively pulling away from stop lights or accelerating, maybe it helps. Day-to-day driving at less than WOT the engine management system will keep the air-fuel ratio at an acceptable value. If it doesn't get enough ...


3

It can be quite hard to grasp these two distinct, yet related concepts. To add to the existing answers: Torque is what accelerates a vehicle from standstill ▲ Torque = ▲ Acceleration The word standstill is very important here, because it is the only time where the aerodynamic drag forces will not limit a vehicle's straight-line acceleration. This is ...


2

Your engine was designed in such a way that it is most efficient between 3500RPM and 5000RPM. That means that the valve timing and camshaft profiles were made in such a way that your engine "breathes" best between those speeds. That's why you have the most torque in that region. Another thing is that as the RPM increases, it gets harder and harder to get the ...


2

There are various reasons as to why an engine is not efficient beyond its tuned range. Laws of thermodynamics, I do not want to get into scientific details but it simply means that you cannot transfer heat and convert it into energy efficiently beyond a certain point where the ambient temperature and cylinder pressure start to make more impact. Geometry of ...


2

That's not a realistic flat-torque graph. It should look more like the following in the real world: Although you woold find that the horsepower v torque holds true if you apply the calculation at any point on the RPM band.


2

Do a search on google for "torque power graph". These graphs plot torque and power against RPM and each engine design will be different. From a graph for your engine you would be able to see which RPM produced the greatest torque. You may be able to find specs for your engine specifying maximum torque and the RPM where this is delivered.


2

You have several options: The internet is a vast resource ... use your Google-Fu and figure it out. You can always ask on here. There are enough of us on here we can get you the torque value for your fastener. You can use the following torque chart from the Bolt Depot: If all else fails, get a dial indicated torque wrench. Put it on the fastener and ...


2

If you don't have access to a torque angle gauge (as rpmerf recommends) or space is tight, here is one possible way estimate the angle with a ratchet: Find a ratchet that fits Without any socket on the ratchet, rotate the square drive head 180° by hand while counting the number of clicks felt. [My own 1/2"-drive ratchet clicks 36 times in a 180° sweep, so ...



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