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6

90° = quarter turn. 180° = half turn. It's alright if you are off a few degrees. I typically start with the breaker bar perpendicular (straight out) and do quarter turns, or have it straight off to the left. Just keep yourself parallel or perpendicular to where you start. DO NOT USE A TORQUE WRENCH. It's bad for the torque wrench to turn after its ...


4

The engine torque produced is a function of the amount of air ingested and the air/fuel ratio combusted in the cylinder(s), combined with 'static' variables like the compression ratio, bore/stroke, crankshaft design, intake length, cam profile, intake and exhaust sizing, etc. With all the other parameters now static (non-variable) once the engine is built ...


4

This is a great vehicle dynamics question that essentially has two parts to it: Is the motor able to hit top speed, 120 mph? Is the torque enough to accelerate it to top speed within 5 seconds? The motor in question Power : 1000 W (~ 1.36 hp) Speed : 3200 RPM Torque : 1.91 Nm Something interesting to note here is the apparent discrepancy between ...


3

Torque in a motorcycle The piston moves up and down, and the force for that comes from the fuel that is burned. Connected to the piston is a rod, the connecting rod, and that rod is connected (with the ability to turn) to the crankshaft. The distance between the pedal to the rotation point is comparable to the distance between the crank and the middle ...


3

horsepower = (torque * RPM) / 5252 always. Typically engines have to suck in their air and fuel so they can only suck in an optimal amount in a certain range. With a turbo you are forcing the air in, so the engine can make more torque over a wider range. If there is a max torque the manufacturer wants to set (for torque limit on the ...


3

Torque the bolt to the required torque. Then mark the head of the bolt with a marker or pen. This way you can visually check the angle. This is commonly used to ensure bolts are torqued during assembly.


3

I'm going to buck the other two answers and tell you DO IT RIGHT OR DON'T DO IT. It is very important to torque your head bolts correctly. The actual preferred method for attaining the proper torque is by figuring out the fastener stretch, not by using a torque wrench. When torquing, you are applying a clamping load on the object you are torquing. You can ...


2

You have several options: The internet is a vast resource ... use your Google-Fu and figure it out. You can always ask on here. There are enough of us on here we can get you the torque value for your fastener. You can use the following torque chart from the Bolt Depot: If all else fails, get a dial indicated torque wrench. Put it on the fastener and ...


2

If you don't have access to a torque angle gauge (as rpmerf recommends) or space is tight, here is one possible way estimate the angle with a ratchet: Find a ratchet that fits Without any socket on the ratchet, rotate the square drive head 180° by hand while counting the number of clicks felt. [My own 1/2"-drive ratchet clicks 36 times in a 180° sweep, so ...


2

Your engine was designed in such a way that it is most efficient between 3500RPM and 5000RPM. That means that the valve timing and camshaft profiles were made in such a way that your engine "breathes" best between those speeds. That's why you have the most torque in that region. Another thing is that as the RPM increases, it gets harder and harder to get the ...


2

There are various reasons as to why an engine is not efficient beyond its tuned range. Laws of thermodynamics, I do not want to get into scientific details but it simply means that you cannot transfer heat and convert it into energy efficiently beyond a certain point where the ambient temperature and cylinder pressure start to make more impact. Geometry of ...


2

That's not a realistic flat-torque graph. It should look more like the following in the real world: Although you woold find that the horsepower v torque holds true if you apply the calculation at any point on the RPM band.


1

It's already well answered here but typically you torque items "under load". Since torque values specify a clamping force you want to be sure that the conditions of the part are most like the "real world" when you set the torque. When I do tires I center the tire and snug down all lugs before putting load back on the suspension and then torquing the lugs. ...


1

If I'm using anti-seize, I still don't reduce the torque on the fastener. I use the amount specified by the application. The reason being is, in most places where torque is a factor, getting the clamping load even is more important than is the factoring in the amount the lube will reduce the need for torque. The anti-seize will work as a lubricant on the ...



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