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16

Does this mod ever give a measurable increase in power? tl;dr: yes, sometimes it works well. But... Your picture is a good illustration of some of the problems with just saying "cold air intake" and expecting that to mean the same thing to all people. Let's break down the pieces of the puzzle and talk about how those might help or hurt: Filter: notice ...


14

No, it won't reduce the torque. Torque is equivalent to radius x force. As long as A, the force is applied at the same distance from the nut/bolt that you're tightening and B, it's applied in the same direction then you'll be applying the same torque. An adapter (especially so short) shouldn't have a noticeable effect on the direction that you're applying ...


10

There's an app for that! Basically if you can constantly measure the acceleration of your car, you can calculate horsepower and torque. I know I have seen advertisements in car magazines in the past for devices you would sick to the windshield, but since smartphones are so widespread and have such advanced accelerometers, Apps have taken over. I don't ...


9

Until the engine starts the only thing applying torque to the drive train is the starter motor, the engine itself is not providing any torque. Starting like this will not cause any damage to the drive train (except perhaps the teeth on the edge of the flywheel that the starter motor engages with) but it does put excessive load on the starter motor and it's ...


9

Horsepower is how much power the engine can produce (how much work is done in a given time), wheras torque is the amount of turning force it can make (how much work is done). The two are quite intricately linked, so you can't have one without the other. You'll need to think of a few physics equations: Force = Mass x Acceleration Power = Work Done (Torque)...


9

Torque is work, horsepower is work rate In the context of engines: Torque indicates how much load an engine can carry for a certain distance in a certain amount of time. Power indicates how fast the engine can move that load over that distance. Some other things that may help to explain the difference between the two: Torque is what accelerates a ...


8

The point is to feel like you've done something cool to your car and freed it from the shackles of The Man/the OEM intake. The primary benefit of Cold Air Intakes is to the bank account of the kit manufacturer, the secondary benefit is your car making a nicer noise, if you like the sound of an aftermarket intake. There's been a few debunkings of CAIs over ...


8

TL;DR The problem you are encountering is the limited resolution of your speed plus fluctuation plus slightly different approaches to calculate power. And finally, you have to think about the term power at wheels. What exactly is power at wheels? I would say, this is the tangential force applied by the wheels onto the street (i.e. the force that's pushing ...


8

If you have to start somewhere and need a complete set to do your job, having the 1/2" drive go down to the 8mm size helps you to do this without having to buy the smaller set. If you can get the complete job done with a single set of sockets, you won't need to get the 3/8" and 1/4" drive sets yet. When working professionally, having the different sized ...


7

It depends. Just because an intake can flow more air mass doesn't guarantee that the engine will utilize it. The intake is part of a system of components. The engine produces power by managing air flow into and out of the combustion chamber. There are usually other actors involved: Intake side. Carburetors, throttle bodies, intake manifolds, intake ...


7

Torque is the amount of force exerted by your engine at a particular RPM. In two cars with equal gearing and in the same gear, a car making twice as much torque will accelerate exactly twice as fast. Horsepower is calculated from torque and RPM. A given amount of torque at a low RPM equals less horsepower than the same amount of torque at a higher RPM. ...


6

90° = quarter turn. 180° = half turn. It's alright if you are off a few degrees. I typically start with the breaker bar perpendicular (straight out) and do quarter turns, or have it straight off to the left. Just keep yourself parallel or perpendicular to where you start. DO NOT USE A TORQUE WRENCH. It's bad for the torque wrench to turn after its ...


6

The basics are quite simple. The motor generates a certain torque N and a certain power P at a given RPM. Further more, the relation between power and torque is: P = C * N * RPM where C is a constant to convert all that odd units. For N, P in SI units, it is C = pi / 30 Neglecting any losses, Power is conserved from the motor to the wheels so you ...


6

There are a few different ways I can think of to do this: If the vehicle has a manual shift transmission, put the transmission into the highest gear, then set the parking brake. The torque provided through the drivetrain will be more than enough to counteract the torque put on the crank hub bolt. If it's a front wheel drive, have someone stand on the brake ...


5

Most oil filters have instructions for tightness printed on them, and they normally read like: Tighten by hand until base contact, and then tighten an additional 1/4 turn. I don't recall ever seeing torque mentioned, because the filter housing relies on the rubber o-ring seal rather than mechanical tightness to seal in the oil. Too much torque will ...


5

I think I got this. someone help me verify... So I watch the tach and speedo to determine MPH per 1000 RPM in higher gears (3rd,4th,5th). On my car its about 10, 15, 19.5. [tire diameter (in inches)] * [pi] * [1/(gear ratio * final drive ratio)] / [in/ft] / [ft/mi] * [RPM] * [min/hr] = MPH constants pi = 3.14159 in/ft = 12 ft/mi = 5280 min/hr = 60 ...


5

Theoretically yes, practically it's not that easy. Line pressure is just one of the components that contribute to the torque capacity of the transmission. First, it's not the speed of the application of a clutch but the holding strength once the clutch is applied that contributes to strength. In this respect higher line pressure will give higher torque ...


5

Power <-> torque relation In general, the relation between power an torque is a simple formula: Power[kW] = Torque[Nm] * RPM * π / 30,000 which means that you can always calculate the one curve from the other in torque/power diagrams (That's also what the dynamometer does) So, why are always both curves plotted, if they are more or less the same? ...


5

Two things to watch out for when using these equations Consistency of units If your mass is in kg, speed in km/h and acceleration in furlongs per week², you're not going to get power in horsepower. Your safest bet is to convert all units to SI metric and convert to hp as a final step. 1000 hp = 746 W Factor in rotational inertia A rule of thumb is to ...


5

Convenience, mainly! Lots of small parts such as covers are held on with small bolts, and it means you can cover the full range of useful sizes with just one set, should you so wish.


5

No, you do not need to remap your ECU This doesn't have anything to do with your air fuel ration and ignition timing. You are simply changing the gear ratio for your final drive. Making the sprocket larger will make all of your gears a bit shorter and reduce your top end speed. I typically do this on most of my motorcycles as it makes for better city ...


5

Torque doesn't matter. It's power. The difference is that diesel engines have their peak power at lower RPM compared to petrol engines. Same power at lower RPM means more torque. (Think about: The motor of my car has max. torque of 95Nm. I torque the wheel lugs with 110Nm by hand. So why can the motor accelerate my car to 150km/h, while I can push it to ...


5

Any MAC or Snap-On truck/dealer has a universal calibration tool that will check the calibration. The issue is that if they are "off", they will probably not have parts if needed, or perhaps the ability to adjust if the tool is not their brand or a similar popular style tool. AngleRepair will do it for $25 and some shipping if you can part with it for a ...


4

I'm taking my information from two sources, this Digital Trends article and the good old Engineering Explained video. Digital Trends explains it as: How this differs from a standard differential is that, where as a basic mechanical diff spins the outer wheel faster than the inner wheel (it has longer to travel), the TVD in the RC F employs electronic ...


4

The engine torque produced is a function of the amount of air ingested and the air/fuel ratio combusted in the cylinder(s), combined with 'static' variables like the compression ratio, bore/stroke, crankshaft design, intake length, cam profile, intake and exhaust sizing, etc. With all the other parameters now static (non-variable) once the engine is built ...


4

There are not calculations. The car has a list of PIDs that the tool checks. The readiness monitors are a set of tests that the car runs including but not limited to EVAP, EGR, CATALIST, O2, FUEL, COMPREHENSIVE. When the codes in a car are cleared all the PID values for the monitors are cleared. As the car completes and passes the necessary tests it will ...


4

Almost never? Mainly because they're really a 'hot air intake system'. This is especially true for cars using forced injection due to the high under-hood temperatures. If you want to reduce intake restriction look into a less restrictive 'panel' filter like a K&N. Even then, it really only matters if your car is intake (vs exhaust) limited and your ECU ...


4

Good question, while we probably can't just ring up a tool manufacturer and ask, we can derive it with some accuracy: Maximum socket size I can find for 1/2" is 36mm, that translates to an M24 fixing: http://stainlessautomotivefastenings.co.uk/pdfs/HEXAGONHEADIDENTIFIER.pdf Standard torque figures for an M24 using a 12.9 grade fixing (strongest grade) is ...


4

There is calibration equipment to zero torque wrenches Snap-On makes this one. Here is a procedure for calibrating one of their digital torque wrenches. To answer your question I've wondered how do you properly determine if an adjustable torque wrench has been zeroed out over it's life and is still accurate? There are various procedures to ...


4

Having a 1/2" drive 8mm socket will get in your way more than it will prove useful. The rim of the socket that fits on the bolt will be too think for you to fit onto an 8mm bolt head time and time again. Perhaps you don't wrench on smaller engines very much, then you won't run into issues as often. If you encountered this clutch cover that size socket ...



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