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14

No, it won't reduce the torque. Torque is equivalent to radius x force. As long as A, the force is applied at the same distance from the nut/bolt that you're tightening and B, it's applied in the same direction then you'll be applying the same torque. An adapter (especially so short) shouldn't have a noticeable effect on the direction that you're applying ...


8

If you have to start somewhere and need a complete set to do your job, having the 1/2" drive go down to the 8mm size helps you to do this without having to buy the smaller set. If you can get the complete job done with a single set of sockets, you won't need to get the 3/8" and 1/4" drive sets yet. When working professionally, having the different sized ...


8

TL;DR The problem you are encountering is the limited resolution of your speed plus fluctuation plus slightly different approaches to calculate power. And finally, you have to think about the term power at wheels. What exactly is power at wheels? I would say, this is the tangential force applied by the wheels onto the street (i.e. the force that's pushing ...


6

There are a few different ways I can think of to do this: If the vehicle has a manual shift transmission, put the transmission into the highest gear, then set the parking brake. The torque provided through the drivetrain will be more than enough to counteract the torque put on the crank hub bolt. If it's a front wheel drive, have someone stand on the brake ...


5

Convenience, mainly! Lots of small parts such as covers are held on with small bolts, and it means you can cover the full range of useful sizes with just one set, should you so wish.


4

Having a 1/2" drive 8mm socket will get in your way more than it will prove useful. The rim of the socket that fits on the bolt will be too think for you to fit onto an 8mm bolt head time and time again. Perhaps you don't wrench on smaller engines very much, then you won't run into issues as often. If you encountered this clutch cover that size socket ...


4

An old trick for this is to remove a spark plug, then feed a length of string into the cylinder through the spark plug hole, leaving enough string hanging out to pull it all out when done. The string won't compress, so stops the motor from turning, allowing you to tighten the crankshaft bolt. When you're done, remove the string by pulling it back out the ...


3

What you are missing is the concept of rotational speed. This is required to fully understand the relationship between horsepower and torque. We'll start with the concept of torque. Torque is simply defined as the rotational force of an object on an axis. This is easily calculated as T = R x F, where: T = Torque R = Position Vector (Essentially the ...


3

Torque is a rotational force. It is a measurement of how hard it is applying force that causes the crankshaft to rotate. Torque is not a very good unit of measurement for an engine because it does not take into consideration how fast the output shaft rotates. For example, given an engine with 100 lb-ft. of torque, if you put that output through a 10:1 ...


2

I would strongly advise against using a 1/2" torque wrench with 1/2->3/8 and 3/8->1/4 adaptors, particularly in the range you are suggesting. 1/4" drive adaptors are weak, and I think you'll struggle to find any that can take 200NM of torque without twisting (or failing completely). I would recommend picking up a rail of 1/2" drive sockets when you get the ...


2

Here's an article on ToyoNation explaining what you need to do: Link Generally, removing the bolts you don't need a sequence. When torquing them back up, you want to do them up in a diagonal star pattern, as you would with your wheel lugs etc. This guide recommends using a toyota sealant, which is probably about right. Any RTV sealant that's at the right ...


1

This is what I have used for years, Snap-On (Blue-Point) adjustable joint pliers, the large variety. Pn HL120P I usually leave the crank pulley on and use that to grip with pliers, most crank pulleys neck down to a smaller diameter than the harmonic balancer, since the pliers only go to about 8". Sometimes it is hard to hold the pliers on bolts torqued ...


1

I spent 25 years as a Helicopter technician, and from year one i was Ordered NEVER EVER to double click a torque wrench. This double clicking that i see mechanics do drives me nuts. You are "overtorquing" if you do it twice.


1

Torque is twisting force, if the adapter has some flex to it then torque would be reduced, similar to the torque you loose on a long ratchet extension bar. A short adapter like in your question would have little or no twist or reduce the torque.



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