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8

Yes you should store it at zero, it weakens the spring. I would have it checked/calibrated to make sure it is still accurate.


7

Nope, doing it with the wheels on the ground if fine, no need to lift the weight of the wheels. It's easier that way because the wheels can't turn while you are torquing the lugs.


6

I would not back the nut off to align the nut with the cotter pinhole. Doing so can result in the taper between the knuckle and the tierod becoming loose. The cotter pin would keep the nut from backing off but it would not prevent the tapered shaft of the tierod from spinning in the tapered hole of the knuckle. As @MikeSaull has suggested lube the threads. ...


5

I believe you are confusing torque (TQ) and horsepower (HP) terms here. HP is a mathematical computation based on TQ. You can derive a HP number by increasing the rotational speed up/down depending on what you want to achieve. Weight of a vehicle will have no affect on either. As mentioned in the comments, TQ output (at the wheels) is greatly affected by ...


5

In an ideal world where time plays no issue you would torque all the lug nuts to 1/3 of the reccomended torque in a crisscross pattern. Reset the torque wrench to 2/3 of the torque spec and tighten again in a crisscross pattern. Finally set the wrench to 100% of the torque spec and do the final tightening. After 50 miles recheck the lugs with the wrench set ...


3

I would use some anti-seize on the threads then tighten it to torque spec. If it doesn't line up then I would tighten it until it does. This is just what I would do. If it is a weak bolt or a really bad place for the threads to strip then I would just loosen it until it lines up. Once the cotter pin is in it shouldn't go anywhere anyways.


3

I think a click wrench is an automatic torque wrench. I think an automatic torque wrench is any wrench that stops applying torque once the specified torque is reached. This could be achieved in a number of ways. Whether it uses a clutch or spring and ball is irrelevant. A click wrench will briefly stop applying torque once the specified torque is reached ...


3

If you were to simply replace the existing petrol engine with an electric motor, then yes, it would ruin the gearbox very quickly, as it won't be able to handle that amount of torque. However, even if the transmission would cope, that wouldn't be the best way of doing it - an electric motor has a very different torque curve to an internal combustion engine, ...


2

I just stumbled across this entry in my factory manual, which says that overtightening is the correct procedure. The safe margin is given by rotation rather than torque, however -- up to 60˚ past the point where the specified torque is reached.


2

air filter is a good place to start. Some owners of older diesel MBZs have used Seafoam or diesel purge to some effect. Take a look at this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCVdSiECajQ be careful, as its easy to hydrolock your motor doing this.


2

Do you have a workshop manual for the car? The torque figures should be listed in there. In the UK Haynes manuals they are at the beginning of the relevant chapter. I'm not aware of a specific order for oil sump bolts, but if there is one it should be listed in the approprate section of said manual. Normally it is only head bolts that need to be tightened ...


2

My Craftsman torque wrench cannot be put back in the box unless it's at 20%. Granted, the plural (or even singular) of anecdote is not data, but I have always heard 20-25% of the max torque it's rated for.


2

As you said the crux of the issue has to do with getting every last amount of energy out of a unit of fuel. You can consider this your total fuel efficiency. Accelerating your vehicle from rest to 60mph or 100km/h will require a fixed amount of energy based on the weight of the vehicle. (excluding wind, friction and rolling resistance). So you need to ...


2

Does accelerating faster worsen fuel efficiency? Yes. Now obviously when you accelerate harder, more fuel is being pumped into your engine, but you'll sooner get to that cruising sweet spot where fuel consumption is a lot less. So is the payoff worth it or not? No. This is easily measured via the OBD II port. For example, my Accessport ...


2

The general "rule of thumb" for horsepower ratings between crank HP (CHP) and rear-wheel HP (RWHP) is ~18-20%. An automatic transmission will be closer to 20%, while a manual transmission around 18%. As you stated, and for the same reasons, these are just a general guideline. If you have the CHP number available, multiply that number by .8. (ie: 450hp x 0.8 ...


1

It sounds like the VANOS seal has failed. The M50TU has a single VANOS that adjusts cam timing at a single point based on RPM. Here is a good article describing the failure symptoms and the repair procedure. http://www.beisansystems.com/procedures/vanos_single_procedure.htm


1

From Wikipedia: Brake horsepower (bhp) is the measure of an engine's horsepower before the loss in power caused by the gearbox, alternator, differential, water pump, and other auxiliary components such as power steering pump, muffled exhaust system, etc. Brake refers to a device which was used to load an engine and hold it at a desired rotational speed. ...


1

You've actually asked two different questions. There is a very simple, mathematical relationship between torque and power. The power P generated at any given point in time is equal to the torque T produced at that time multiplied by the angular velocity w (i.e. engine RPM) at that time. P = T * w As to how the power is distributed to the wheels, that's ...


1

It takes a specific amount of energy to accelerate a specific amount of mass to a specific speed. So just looking at those factors, you'd be right to assume that it matters little how quickly you accelerate said mass. But that's not how the real world works. The problem here is that combustion engines and the many things we connect them to are astoundingly ...


1

Oil pans don't have a specific bolt sequence like a cylinder head or crankshaft bolts. This link should be helpful: TDIClub Forums - View Single Post - frequently asked torque specs: Use Silicone sealant D 176 404 A2 Removing Remove center, left and right sound insulation trays: Drain engine oil. Remove securing bolts for oil pan. ...


1

Not actually a solution, more of a workaround: can you raise the idle speed slightly? I know it is supposed to run happily at 700-800 but I had use of a very old truck that had a problem with torque at idle that we failed to diagnose (it wasn't worth much so we didn't try too hard) and our fix was to make it idle about 120rpm faster. Solved the issue.



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