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4

Analysing in cylinder pressure waveform is extremely useful in developing combustion strategies in OEM R&D environments and also for diagnosing lots of issues. I have taken picture and its explanation from a Snap on product catalogue which I thought was well explained. A—Ready Position — Piston has stopped at TDC — Cylinder contents are ...


6

I use pressure transducers to test for cam sync problems. And other problems. Cam sync problems are seen on the waveform in a section called the exhaust ramp. The middle of the ramp moves back and forth as the valve timing changes. It is easy to see if you know where to look. Training in what to look for is required. It is a bit like interpreting ignition ...


4

Most accurate way to diagnose plugged exhaust (not severe) or chain stretch is to compare to known good waveforms on same engine and year. Like any other diagnostic tool of this type it takes time and experience to do it without comparing to good waveforms. Another good tool in conjunction with compression tool you describe is looking at oscilloscope ...


4

I'm going to take a different approach to this. As pictured, it's perfectly safe, and sometimes recommended to spread out the pressure to avoid damage. However, I've also seen a pile of wood used to extend a jack's height...and then fall over. Don't do that! (The car in question landed on the freshly-unpadded jack with the oil pan...messy.)


6

It is ABSOLUTELY safe. I do this all the time. Mind you I usually use a piece of 2x4, though. It spreads the load over more of the frame or body and keeps the jack stand from doing any damage. The jack stand does dig into the wood, which is much better than digging into your vehicle. The wood can crack. The wood can do a lot of things. But once the wood is ...


9

This is a good recommendation The wood will compress a bit when you lower your car down onto it. The jack stand will dig into the wood as well. The benefits related to this related to the vehicle slipping on the jack stands. I've never had a piece of wood fail doing this, although soft white pine sometimes comes out looking pretty beat up. To answer ...


9

Being as it's only 0.05mm larger in diameter, you shouldn't have a problem unless you're using that socket on a rattle-gun every day. If it's a 6-point socket, the wear on the nut should be minimal (12-point sockets have more of a chance at 'rounding' the nut). Ideally, however, you should go down to the shop and spend two dollars on the correct sized ...


4

Mig welder is what I use for welding nuts to broken fasteners, 100-120 amps or better should do it on that size bolt. Stick welder about the same amps, use a 6013 rod, 6011 for better penetration if needed. My amp recommendations are general in nature, you want the most heat and penetration you can get quickly without melting the nut completely.


1

I spent 25 years as a Helicopter technician, and from year one i was Ordered NEVER EVER to double click a torque wrench. This double clicking that i see mechanics do drives me nuts. You are "overtorquing" if you do it twice.


4

Having a 1/2" drive 8mm socket will get in your way more than it will prove useful. The rim of the socket that fits on the bolt will be too think for you to fit onto an 8mm bolt head time and time again. Perhaps you don't wrench on smaller engines very much, then you won't run into issues as often. If you encountered this clutch cover that size socket ...


8

If you have to start somewhere and need a complete set to do your job, having the 1/2" drive go down to the 8mm size helps you to do this without having to buy the smaller set. If you can get the complete job done with a single set of sockets, you won't need to get the 3/8" and 1/4" drive sets yet. When working professionally, having the different sized ...


5

Convenience, mainly! Lots of small parts such as covers are held on with small bolts, and it means you can cover the full range of useful sizes with just one set, should you so wish.


2

I would strongly advise against using a 1/2" torque wrench with 1/2->3/8 and 3/8->1/4 adaptors, particularly in the range you are suggesting. 1/4" drive adaptors are weak, and I think you'll struggle to find any that can take 200NM of torque without twisting (or failing completely). I would recommend picking up a rail of 1/2" drive sockets when you get the ...


1

Torque is twisting force, if the adapter has some flex to it then torque would be reduced, similar to the torque you loose on a long ratchet extension bar. A short adapter like in your question would have little or no twist or reduce the torque.


14

No, it won't reduce the torque. Torque is equivalent to radius x force. As long as A, the force is applied at the same distance from the nut/bolt that you're tightening and B, it's applied in the same direction then you'll be applying the same torque. An adapter (especially so short) shouldn't have a noticeable effect on the direction that you're applying ...



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