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11

I'm going to answer the basic mechanical points, as weighted by my opinion of importance. I'm leaving out the issue of waxing as potentially too broad. Safety: These are critical. Do not proceed down the list without addressing each (at least). Safety glasses: Always wear them, especially when you don't think that you need to. I purchased mine from the ...


9

First off, everything Bob said. General Socket Extensions: Your socket set may come with 1 or 2 extensions but I'd buy a couple more. Having different length extensions are invaluable for getting to hard to reach items, plus you can combine them together for a longer extension. Socket U-Joint Adapter: I never see these in socket sets and you will regret ...


8

Yes you should store it at zero, it weakens the spring. I would have it checked/calibrated to make sure it is still accurate.


7

If buying one of the pre-assembled sets is not an option, the following answers will assume you will keep your tools in some form of carry bag... You can begin by alienating all your sockets, and sorting them. Purchase a couple of socket rails, which can be had for cheap, and snap them on. Insert these into your bag. Next, alienate your wrenches and sort ...


7

I would suggest looking at the tools you plan to purchase for use with the compressor. Air tools will list what CFM @ X PSI they need to operate. That is the most important number, to make sure it can supply the air flow your tools need to run. Beyond that, horsepower and tank size are going to be how much money you are willing to spend. A larger tank ...


6

Usually the bolts that strut braces attach to are the ones that attach the strut assembly to the car. The spring is held in place in the strut assembly by the nut in the middle, which I have never needed to remove to install any strut braces. See how the brace below has a hole in the middle for the top shock nut: This shock nut holds the upper spring ...


6

The weight of the car will be sufficient to keep the spring from decompressing fully and pulling out the bottom of the strut frame in the car. You must be careful not to jack the car up without the bolts secured tightly though, this could produce a dangerous situation. Also if you are ever working on the 'southern' half of the spring, where it interacts ...


6

Following on from Bob and ManiacZX's answers: Screwdrivers A good assortment of screwdrivers are essential - including torx or hex bits if your car uses them. Some socket sets include screwdriver bits, which can be very useful. An old long-handled flat driver can often double up as an impromptu pry-bar too... Hammer Like the above, you'll probably ...


6

Double checking your torque is never a bad thing. The only thing you lose is a half second of your time. Peace of mind is what it's all about. One of the reasons for doing this, though, might be when you are torquing, the fastener itself becomes slightly bound up, not giving a perfectly correct reading. By double clicking, you are allowing the fastener to ...


5

I strongly support PetroEkos's suggestion of a tool bag. I'll go even further and suggest that you invest in a separate job bag: i.e., take some time before the task to reach into your (now nicely organized) selection of tools and make a good guess as to which tools you're definitely going to need. You usually won't get the inventory exactly right but ...


5

Using a flare nut wrench (aka line wrench) should be used if it is calling for it. The reasoning for using a flare wrench over an open ended wrench is that you can grip all sides of the fitting just like you can with a box wrench but the opening at the end of the wrench allows you to slip over the connected hose/line unlike a box wrench. This allows you to ...


5

No, you've got everything you'll need. A head gasket replacement isn't a job that requires lots of specialist equipment. It's mainly a set of wrenches (including a torque wrench) and something to scrape the old gasket off. But it's a long and tedious job. And I can't stress that last bit enough, especially if it's the first time you do it. If you want to ...


5

If you feel you would like to get a new extinguisher, I'd just suggest you get one to replace the old one. Buy a bracket to hold it down and mount it some place where you have easy access. The reason I say this is because almost exclusively the fire extinguisher will not be used for your vehicle, but for someone else's vehicle. Will a 1kg extinguisher put ...


4

If you're looking for personal use and already have access to a laptop computer, I'd highly recommend getting a PC (or Mac, if that's what you have)-based one. You buy the hardware, generally for $100 or less (I recommend the units from ScanTool.net - the less expensive ones are fine). The biggest advantage is that you can start out with the free software ...


4

Yes, there are a variety of tools like what you describe that come under the heading of an automotive pulley holding tool. If you look through the result set of that search, you'll see that the Y-shaped wrench style that you describe is only one of the choices. Another that may apply to your application is almost like an inside-out socket that grips the ...


4

Being that I'm mostly done with the job, here are some additional tools that have come in handy, beyond what I originally mentioned: Adjustable (or large, maybe 1-inch) wrenches to grab the hex on the cams and lock in place to break the cam sprocket bolts. 17mm open-end wrench (other people say screwdriver, but the wrench works much better!) to wedge in ...


4

The biggest reason most tap handles look like your first picture and not like the second picture is pure and simple: control. The small ratchet head like you are showing in the second picture would not give the user any kind of stability as you try to turn it, mind you it might work okay for chasing threads, but definitely not good for trying to cut new one. ...


3

You can try heating it with a torch to loosen it. You could also get a reverse-direction drill bit, and drill down into the bolt; the heat will help the reverse bit to unscrew it, and if not then you can easily get the remainder of the bolt out by stepping up bit sizes.


3

Look at the ALDL connector if you have this on it's OBD II If you have something differant like the one below, it' not OBD II


3

This concept works surprisingly well on some engines. As you have mentioned, the issue is whether the dipstick tube allows full access to the sump. It's unclear from this diagram whether the tube would reach down into the sump. It's also unclear if the tube would run into a baffle or the pickup tube instead of going all the way to the bottom of the sump. To ...


3

The "air gun", or "impact wrench", is the powered version of an astonishingly cheap and effective hand tool called an "impact driver", which translates the force of a hammer blow to the butt end of the tool into rotational force at the bit. One of these babies is capable of applying a very large torque to a nut -- mine claims 200 ft-lbs. per whack. The most ...


3

I think a click wrench is an automatic torque wrench. I think an automatic torque wrench is any wrench that stops applying torque once the specified torque is reached. This could be achieved in a number of ways. Whether it uses a clutch or spring and ball is irrelevant. A click wrench will briefly stop applying torque once the specified torque is reached ...


3

There should be a locking screw securing the bezel of the dial. If all you're trying to do is calibrate for zero, you should be able to close the jaws (don't force it), loosen the locking screw and rotate the bezel until the zero and the needle line up. To get a more useful calibration, you're going to need to check other non-zero measurements. That will ...


3

Sadly, I have a lot of experience with this exactly situation. We're not quite as deep into the Salt Belt as PA but still.... Will be removing at least some heat shielding ... For this part of the task, the most important tool that you need is replacement bolts. Those little heat shield bolts are the absolute worst: they're cheap metal holding other ...


2

I have one of these. Inserting the suction hose into the dipstick tube didn't allow me to remove even half of the oil (the container is marked to show the level of the contents, though it's hard to read except in bright sunlight). However, there is an easy solution! Measure the dipstick tube diameter and go to your parts shop for a suction hose with a ...


2

I would recommend a few items A spanner set with open and closed heads ViseGrip 1/4" and 1/2" socket wrench sets In my experience the sizes I use most are 8mm, 9mm, 10mm, 14mm, 15mm, 17mm and the inches equivelants


2

I cannot answer all of your questions, as my experience is only with one OBD II scanner. I can give you the feedback that I've been using the very basic Actron CP9125 for years, and it has served my purpose of reading CEL codes (and resetting them) very well, on a number of different Japanese import cars. The Actron CP9125 can only read codes (and it comes ...


2

There are a lot of favorable reviews on the ELM327 on DealExtreme. $52.99 currently...


2

Check out this solution at ThinkGeek. It plugs in to your OBDII port, . It connects via Bluetooth, and works with several different apps from the Android market. HTH!


2

My Craftsman torque wrench cannot be put back in the box unless it's at 20%. Granted, the plural (or even singular) of anecdote is not data, but I have always heard 20-25% of the max torque it's rated for.



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