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4

The answer is "sort of". Yes you can get dedicated "wets" which are race tyres for wet tracks. They are soft and heavily grooved but are not a practical solution for daily use. To be honest I think this is really a matter of learning the limitations of your tyres in different conditions and riding to the conditions. There isn't a magic tyre that will make ...


1

You can see this question on how to decode the age of a tire. Regarding how to read the code if it is on the inside of the wheel, Fred Wilson's answer should be adequate: use a small mirror and flashlight to locate the code and determine the age. One thing which I have noticed is that some tire manufacturers (especially the less-reputable ones) will not ...


3

The age code is only on one sidewall. There is no requirement that it be installed facing out. I have used a mirror to read the code when installed on inside. Tirerack.com has a good article on how to interpret the codes. There is no regulation concerning how many years should be left on a vehicle in the US. Some say 6 yrs max other say 10 years. I have ...


-1

I know when it comes to drift cars, they go with a lower profile to reduce the shaking of the the side walls, making it more predictable.


2

If your car is relatively brand new, you may have inferred TPMS, which compares the rolling radius of each tire. If any single tire rolls more rapidly than another, then that tire must have lower pressure than the other, assuming the same tire size. This eliminates the tire pressure sensor in each wheel and its replacement upon tire replacement. So if one ...


4

You might be misinterpreting your tire pressure indicator light. Usually the light comes on when the tire pressure drops below a certain level in at least one tire. I've not heard of one responding to too high a pressure, but I suppose it's possible. I think your pressure indicator light may be indicating a problem with the tire pressure sensor system ...


0

You can verify that by looking at the tread and the sidewall. If there is imminent separation, there will be undulation in one or the other. If they're round and straight/linear/curved/however you want to phrase it... no dips or bumps, you're looking at something else. Tire/wheel balance, ball joints, tie rods, etc.


2

I had a almost complete tread separation on a 6 year old tire on the front while driving on the freeway. Luckily I heard it start thumping and was able to get off the road right away. The other front tire was about to start doing the same thing. I replaced all 4 since they were about the same age. I now believe it's a good idea to replace the tires after ...


0

I've recently (in the last three months) started running my tyres at relatively high pressure on my daily driver as I'm a hypermiler and higher pressure does indeed decrease rolling resistance and improve in-gear coasting range. Obviously I never exceed the manufacturers stated maximum printed on the sidewall. I have not noticed and appreciable difference ...


1

Tyres pumped up to 45 bar would probably explode... What car do you have, as even 45psi sounds high for a normal car? You should always inflate your tyres to the manufacturer's recommended pressure. Over-inflating will lead to increased wear (so you'll have to replace them more quickly, negating any fuel saving!), and poorer grip and handling, leading to ...


4

Judging by the date of manufacture, (0811) those tires are over 4 years old. This alone is reason enough to not use the tires as the rubber will harden over time, even if it hasn't been used, let alone with peripheral cracks like the ones shown!


6

Short answer, yes. Long answer...Yes


10

I have only seen wear like that in tires that are around 10 years old. What does the date code say? Have you ever let a rubber-band sit for years? You are risking tread separation by driving them like this. If you can afford the tires you should replace them. An accident at high speed will cost you more than the tires.


3

tl dr; More pressure = less noise. Here is a pretty good write-up about the affects of tire noise. In the write-up it states the following: Tires running higher inflation pressures generate lower noise levels compared to those with lower inflation levels. This holds true to my line of thought because a flat tire (or very low tire) will make a lot ...


1

few things to check before you go spending too much money wheel bearings Warped disc brakes correctly balanced wheels (sounds oblivious but this used to be the issue 90% of the time when i worked in a garage) tracking (as already mentioned) bottom arm bushes after those, things start to get more expensive, its whether the cars worth spending the money ...


2

tl dr - There is absolutely no worries about putting a higher rated tire on your vehicle. It just means you can drive your car faster if the car is capable (and the speed limits will allow). You will gain nothing in any other aspect of the tire, such as tire life, treadwear, or what have you. In fact, the higher speed rating doesn't have much to do with ...


2

Both run-flat and fix-a-flat share a disadvantage IMHO: both can let you down in case of a tear on the tire side-wall. This is rather common when off-roading (rocks), which is why no serious off-roading vehicle will lack a (normal-sized) spare tire. But it can also happen in urban driving: Rub the tire once too often against a curb, pressing it against ...


5

Here's some issues I have with fix-a-flat: In the case of a large puncture / fast leak, you'll need to add air. Runflats are good because in case of a sudden loss of pressure, they'll get you to a tire shop. With fix-a-flat, if you have a sudden loss of pressure, you'll have to limp your car to a gas station or carry a compressor around. Fix-a-flat ...


2

Since the vehicle is a rear-wheel drive, placing the larger wheels on the front would have the advantage of maintaining normal sized wheels on the driving axle. This means the drive-train is working at its intended rotation. Placing larger wheels on the driven axle would mean the engine would have to rev lower to produce the same speed. This is probably a ...


3

Along with what @Zaid said, which I agree with, there are two other aspects to worry about: Antilock Brake System (ABS) Traction control (I'm not sure your Sierra has this, but it bears mentioning) The problem with the ABS is, with that much of a difference, your ABS will believe there is a fault with the system and shut it down or might believe the ...


2

Something to watch out for Since you intend to buy second-hand, one thing to watch out for is the age of the tire. From personal experience in desert climate, standard tires usually don't last beyond 3-4 years. A premium tire might buy you an extra year. See this question to know how to tell the age of a tire. Putting on a different size A rule of ...



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