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1

Going to a 205 width tire, you would need to move to a smaller profile ratio - which would be a 55, in order to get close to the original tire height. Typically, going to a wider tire hampers original performance. Wider tires weigh more, have a wider contact patch, so it takes more force to move (increased fuel consumption), and harder for it to channel ...


1

TireRack has an article specifically on this topic http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=52 -- edit: just found this: http://www.michelinman.com/mediabin/Approved/Michelin/Visuals/Digital/Two_Tire_Poster_Michelin_042009.pdf


1

The rubber compounds in winter tires are designed to remain flexible in colder temperature (as well as any other fancy technology the manufacturer may incorporate). Even on dry pavement, tires designed to remain firm at very warm temperatures become very hard at cold temperatures. DAGS on "7 degrees C winter tires" and you will find lots of articles ...


1

The short answer is that it depends. I drive around in what is likely a similar climate: the winters are chilly but huge snows are unlikely. Instead, we will often get between a light dusting and an inch of snow. In that sort of weather, all weather tires have suited me fine. They do not perform as well in the snow as dedicated snow tires (as I said in ...


0

Where I live here in the States, we usually have winter snows which fall every year. Not a great amount, but enough to wreak havoc upon the locals. We utilaize good all-season radials year round with no ill effect. Most new cars here tend to come with all-season radials (unless it's a specialty vehicle). These types of tires are just as described and can be ...


0

Yes, it's actually a good idea. Just note that you can't fit 15" tires to 16" rims or vice versa, meaning you'd have to get a set of rims too. If you're not terribly image conscious, you may very well get your hands on a set of steel rims that look ugly, but will take your 15" snow tires. Plastic trimmings for steel rims are cheap though, so there's that. ...


2

There are several things you need to be aware of when doing this. First, you'll incur the cost of getting new rims (which I'm sure you already realize). This is actually pretty common when fitting snow tires, though. Having a second set of cheaper rims (steel is cheaper than alloy) you can change out yourself versus having to take them to the shop to get ...


0

I can't comment on whether or not it's a safe practice for your exact configuration. However, downsizing to smaller diameter and width tires is a common practice for snow tires in general. Not only is smaller cheaper, but it also works better in most Winter conditions.


0

Before you rely on the TPMS on your vehicle, find out if it direct or indirect. If you have an indirect system be aware that the tyre has to deflate by a great deal before it registers with the signal light using the ABS wheel sensors. The direct system is much better as the tyre will have a sensor inside of which transmits its pressure to a reciever in the ...


5

I maybe know a better way for you. I saw it at some customer tyre and was very impressed. TYRE VALVE CAPS WITH PRESSURE INDICATOR :D They exist for different pressure ranges. So everything you need to do, just go around your car sometimes and look that they are green. If they are yellow or red, you lost some pressure.


2

I think the usual advice is to check them as part of your 'weekly' checks (the ones that hardly anyone actually does every week, or even month!), along with the lights, tyre tread etc. I certainly wouldn't bother for a 20 mile trip, unless I had a known slow puncture that I was monitoring. I usually just check them whenever I remember to do so - although I ...


1

Actually checking your tire pressure should usually be a monthly maintenance item. If you make a habit of it, checking other items at the same time is a good idea as well, such as your coolant and oil levels (though, checking your oil a little more often is a good thing, say weekly). Something you can do is get used to where your tires sit (the "squish" if ...


0

The hole was prepared the same as a cold patch. The hot patch was clamped in place with a special clamp. The patch was lit with a match and the patch was vulcanized to the tire.


0

While most tires will require replacement before they achieve 10 years, it is advocated that any tires in service 10 years or more from the date of manufacture, including spare tires, be replaced with new tires as a simple precaution even if such tires appear service able and even if they have not made the legal wear limit.


5

Take it back to where you had the tires put on, either they aren't balanced correctly or you have a bad tire (Broken Belt, out of round etc.).



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