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1

You are actually using the penny the wrong way. Abe's head should be pointing down. You are looking to see if the depth of the tread goes up past his head. I believe the depth is supposed to be 3/32" or more to be good. The penny test is just rule of thumb. If the top of Abe's head is anywhere close to being seen, you probably need new tires. You are not ...


0

As long as tread depth is above minimum rear to front swap is not generally an issue (obviously the best condition tyres should be up front).If you have power steering and turn wheels while stationary you will enhance tyre wear


0

A car on a jack is usually a very unstable object. Even when if are changing a wheel on a level surface, you should use everything available to stop your car moving when jacked up: handbrake, reverse gear or park, and wedge or stone or brick or whatever. When the the car direction is more or less aligned with the slope, using everything at hand to secure ...


4

If you leave the car in gear, and depending on if the vehicle is front-wheel, rear-wheel drive, don't jack both front wheels up if front-wheel drive, etc. This way you always have a tire on the ground that is in gear. So if your left-front tire blew out and your car is front wheel drive, jack it up so the right-front wheel stays fully weighted on the ground. ...


10

Yes, wheel chocks would help in this case. Also, use of the emergency brakes as well as leaving it in gear (EDIT- Leave it in gear if a manual or park if automatic). If wheel chocks are not available, you could use a largish stone which could be wedged between the tire and the ground on both sides of the tire. This would be on a tire which is not flat and ...


2

I work for a tire company. They've done extensive testing, in a warehouse, tires are good for a long time. So much so that they've successfully kept away any legislation mandating a timeline of how long they should last. We have regularly sold tires up to 5 years old, and that is to a wholesaler (which means they could sit for an additional amount of time ...


-1

All depends on manufacturer. Some warranty tyres from date of manufacture some from date fitted. Ask! Also to prolong life use tyre black/rotate as manual specifies/regularly check tyre pressures/try and avoid locking up brakes on cars pre-ABS, as you can create flat spots.


-1

as suggested check at ambient temp. Do not rely on gauges at your local servo.A decent gauge showing both metric and imperial pressures is under $30 and a good investment


0

check bushes on top and bottom of your shock absorber.As this only occurs on one wheel it's a definite possibility.I much prefer rubber bushes for aggressive driving.Given only four hand prints of rubber are between you and eternity why buy cheap tyres built down to a price not up to a standard.Not knowing your vehicle or tyre construction it is hard to ...


1

Firstly discs do not warp.Pads contain metal that deposit on rotor so when measured in a number of places it is assumed the disc is warped.Check balance weights on rim have not fallen off.Jack up front wheels one at a time;grasp tyre each side of centre and pull to and away from you.Any noise or movement may indicate that tension on bearings is incorrect


3

There are a few possible things which could cause vibrations: When breaking hard, your discs could take up some heat and get warped, great article could be found here. Bad geometry could cause vibrations + uneven tyre wear (flat spots maybe?), see related article. Check wheel balancing, article here. I would recommend to check these first, there are ...


0

Tire pressure goes up and down with the weather. As we know from physics, gas and volume and pressure are all controlled by temperature: pv=nrt. The car may have indeed been low pressure when you drove it off the lot (presumably during a cold spell), and after some combination of heat from driving on the pavement / warmer weather, the pressure may have come ...


0

First of all, I doubt it's a huge issue with your vehicle. If you did a visual inspection of the tires (or even with a tire pressure gauge) and found there wasn't any issues, I wouldn't think it's an issue. Remember, as well, most TPS systems will register a problem if the pressure is too high, too low, or if a sensor quits transmitting. It (obviously) seems ...


13

The tilt of the wheel is known as the camber angle. Tilting the wheel in that manner is called negative camber. Doing it the other way around (top outwards) is positive camber. Mounting the wheel with a negative camber improves grip under hard cornering as it counteracts rolling. On a completely level tire (0 camber), when a horizontal force is applied ...


2

The question assumes that the car is a drivable configuration, which may not be true. This car and similar photos you have seen probably have Height adjustable suspension this allows the ride height of the car to be changed on demand. In all likelihood the frame of the car pictured is sitting on the ground. The suspension has been lowered (or tires raised) ...


5

In this specific example the car is more than likely using airbags. When you decrease or increase the height of a car it affects the tire alignment by usually causing positive camber, pushing the top of the tires outward, this is a highly modified suspension system. This particular person has modified their suspension so the top of the tires tuck in when ...


4

It is entirely for style. This is called "camber". The tires will wear in an odd manner. The tire contact with the road is usually a rectangle on the bottom of the tire. This extreme camber makes the contact patch very small and near the inside edge of the tire. This does significantly reduce grip.


-3

Because people are stupid. It's simply for the look or maybe to get the car even closer to the ground when the wheels are too tall. There is no practical reason to do so and if you tried to drive such a car, you will probably die in a horrible accident because you won't get any grip.


0

Here is a listing of Audi wheel fitment I pulled from this site: Model Year PCD Offset Bore 100 90 to 94 5×112 35 to 45 57.1 200 90 to 94 5×112 40 to 45 57.1 80 92 to 95 4×108 35 to 45 57.1 90 92 to 95 4×108 35 to 45 57.1 A2 00 on 5×100 38 to 45 57.1 ...


0

Paulster2 gave the right answer. But in the case of an emergency where you don't have a spare tire, you could use a can of tyre-jack (or Tyre-Weld, etc) to reinflate the tire and seal the hole so that you can continue driving to a safe place or the nearest tire dealer. It's a good idea to keep two of these cans in your car, especially if you're going on a ...


4

Does anyone have a definitive answer as to which option I should choose? I do: you need matching tires. That said, it's your car and you have to make the decision. I'd tend to replace all four. @Paulster2 also makes a good point that you could shave down a new one to match. Let's start by looking at one of the most useful paragraphs from the ...


7

No, it cannot. In fact, in the United States it is illegal for a tire shop to repair a tire which has side wall damage. The reason for this is because the integrity of the tire itself is compromised with side wall damage. Now, I'm not saying it could not be fixed per se (a simple patch could probably do it), but would you want to risk your safety or that of ...



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