New answers tagged

0

This damage is not acceptable. Water could get into the inner layers of the tire that contain the steel belts and corrode them which can lead to tread separation. Tread separation would result in tire failure that could lead to loss of control of the vehicle. Proper tire repair standards require that the hole be plugged to seal against water intrusion into ...


2

With the wires snapped like that I would not trust its structural integrity any more. I feel similarly to tlhingan - tyres are one of your most important safety features. You should never compromise on them! Replace now. Don't wait until something catastrophic happens.


0

I don't see it as a massive hole. I'd keep driving, but still make sure my spare tire is ready for a job.


0

Tires are really important to me as they are the only part of the car touching the ground. So with tire damage this extensive, I would replace the tire, even a pair of tires if I can't find the same make and model.


3

If you have 16.5" diameter rims, and wish to retain them, then you must match the exact inner rim diameter with replacement tires. Never attempt to "get by" with a 16" or 17" tire on a 16.5 rims. Similar things were attempted for a very short while when metric diameter wheels were brought briefly to the US, and then stocks of tires vanished with the ill-...


4

It looks cosmetic to me especially since the gash isn't very deep. The length of the gash doesn't look very concerning since there appears to be plenty of material left underneath the gash. You also stated that it has held air fine over the past year plus, so I would think you'd be fine. If it really bothers you, it wouldn't be a bad idea to just replace the ...


-4

Tires are one of those things that you don't repair. If it's damaged/compromised, just buy a new one. Tires are cheaper than back in the past, and speeds higher.


1

It is a good idea to leave the nail in the tire when you take it for repair as it shows the shop where the damage is, or at least some of it, and what caused it. This helps get a faster and more certain repair on the tire. However, during the repair they should remove the nail - they should never, ever leave the nail in after they have fixed the tire! If ...


3

Is it possible that you got the flat tire by driving over several nails? There may have been multiple nails in the tire and the repair shop only removed/repaired one. The fact that they may have missed one is in itself inexcusable but this could explain the situation. Many shops repair a nail by not demounting the tire from the rim/wheel. They simply ...


2

Definitely not normal. Absolutely agree with DucatiKiller The only time it is best to leave a nail in is BEFORE the tyre has gone flat and you intend to drive somewhere, immediately, to get it repaired. If the tyre still holds air, it might just get you there. Pull it out and it will not. Please come back and tell us all that it is a plug that you can ...


42

Nope, not normal You do not leave a foreign object in a tire under any circumstances. The object can dislodge itself during higher speeds and lead to deflation creating a very high risk event. If they plugged the tire there will be a rubber plug with vulcanizing glue but not a nail or other related object. Validate that it's not a rubber plug, if it's ...


7

No, that is not normal. It needs to be removed and the hole should be patched from the inside. Sealants or plugs are not usually a recommended fix.


1

I would suggest taking the car back to the shop that did the tire change. They will be able to check the tire balance. If you are still not happy with the tire, most tire shops will allow you to exchange them within X number of days if you have not put more than ~100 miles on them (varies by shop).


1

Your Jeep is equipped with aftermarket tires, not stock tires. If you search for tires based on the vehicle type, you won't find anything, and the 2005 Wrangler (TJ) was never offered with 16" rims. Don't search by vehicle type, search by tire size. There are several manufacturers that sell tires in this size. I run Yokohamas and Mickey Thompsons, both in ...


0

A quick search states that Maxxis manufacture a type known as the Creepy Crawler M8090 in 35x12.5 R16. I would assume other manufacturers produce similar tyres in the same size. Within the UK, there are a number of these available. Searching Amazon just for the tyre size (search criteria "35/12.50R16") turned up an alternative compatible product, a "Super ...


1

Will it work? Yeah... The downside is that you'll cook the winter tires in the summer, and destroy them. I'd recommend getting some 3-season tires (4 of them) for the Summer, and when winter comes buy two new winter tires. You'll then have two complete sets of tires which are ideal for the uses you'll put them to, and you'll get a much longer life out of ...


1

About 4 years ago, I bought a set of General Altimax RTs for my 2007 Camry. On a dangerous driving scale of 10=highest, I'd say I drive around a 7. Almost always 10-15MPH over the speed limit on freeway and aggressive starts. My Camry has a V6 which has more than enough power to spin the wheels if I try hard enough. With this said, 4 years later, those ...


1

If you think the winter tires won't last the following winter, then you should change them immediately. Winter tires will get decimated during summer conditions. They are also much less effective in warmer condition compared to all seasons, so if you would not run on a tire for its intended purpose, you should not drive on it when it is in sub-optimal ...


5

You will run into these risks if you decide to take the car on a trip like this: Tire may burst at highway speeds. It may deflate over the time. Steering may become shaky, if it is the front tire. If you still want to take the risk, I would recommend you take the following precautions: Drive slowly, no more than 50 mph. Check pressure a few times ...


2

It's a run-flat tire, so not as bad as a normal tire, but I'd drive to nearest dealership to get their advice. I wouldn't try 100 miles on it.


0

Your friend may also be referring to the tire being too wide for the wheel. In this case the normally flat surface is forced to curve in order for the side walls to fit into a narrower space. As Paulster stated, there are a great many variables that come into play, but the basic idea is that a larger contact patch with the same tire compound and the same ...


1

I know this doesn't relate to the reassembly process, that's been covered in the other answer by Paul. However most of the time, the rear sprocket is not physically attached to the wheel. They are two separate pieces which have rubber inserts between the metal "teeth". The rubber inserts are there for dampening torque from the motor if you let the clutch out ...


0

DT ik....NO..And always rotate your tires and never put a donut tire on the front if its a front wheel drive or back of its rear wheel drive


1

If you decide to keep driving on this tire, don't use superglue on that rubber flap. When superglue sets it becomes rigid and brittle. The tire will flex a bit when you drive, and break the glue bond in a short time. Instead, use the rubber glue from a bike tire puncture repair kit.


2

looking at tire rack. Searched by rim (wheel) size. Came up with 3 results. 8.75R16.5 9.5R16.5 37x12.5R16.5 The 9.5R16.5 looks somewhat close in size at 30.6x9.5. http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Firestone&tireModel=Transforce+HT&partnum=950R65THT&vehicleSearch=false&fromCompare1=yes


0

I had a about a 1/2" tear on the outer wall of a brand new tire.The rim had a scratch, thinking a a curb cut the flap of rubber. Used Gorilla super glue, using latex gloves, squirted a dab of glue into cut, pressed the rubber together. Excess glue created a seal around the cut. Tire looks new, flap is secure. Got lucky the tire wasn't cut deeper so no air ...


2

The number immediately following the R in tyre size information denotes the diameter of the wheel which that tyre is designed to be mounted upon. This is quotes in inches and the beads of the tyres (i.e. the bits that seal against the rim) are made to be the appropriate diameter. You must ensure that your wheel diameter and tyre diameter number match ...


4

A 205/55/R16 tire is a 16 inch inner diameter tire intended for 16 inch wheels. If the current tires on your car are 225/45/R17 that means you have 17 inch wheels fitted and you cannot fit the new tires on smaller wheels. The tire websites cannot tell the size of wheels you are currently using, as the manufacturer usually lists at least a couple of ...


4

I agree wholeheartedly with both Ben and Paulster. However, I use a high-power air impact for to tighten, on it's lowest setting, and also have a selection of color "torque stix" with a minimum of three passes (snug, torque, final) while in the air. While not perfect, I think this is a reasonable compromise between my efficiency needs and returning a safe ...


8

That would be correct. There should be no issue of using the impact with the wheel off the ground. You are exactly right in that the tire should be on the ground when using a breaker bar or tire iron. The reason for this, besides the wheel spinning and you never getting the lug loosened, is because you could torque the car over and cause it to fall off of ...


5

Copy paste from the Pirelli USA website: PIRELLI ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT & REPLACEMENT LIMITED WARRANTY MOTORCYCLE TIRES What Is Warranted and Who Is Eligible Under the Warranty? Pirelli Tire LLC (Pirelli), 100 Pirelli Drive, PO Box 700, Rome, GA 30161-7000, warrants to the original purchaser that all Pirelli Original Equipment and ...


1

Your Tire has suffered internal failure of the layers that make up your tire. Replace immediately. Can you drive it to your Tire store? Yes. But maintain low speed and avoid potholes.


2

To answer the original question, there is no value in an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) tire pressure recommendation, if you are not using OEM recommended wheels and tire sizes. It's that simple. The ONE really important "recommendation" is that you should never exceed the maximum rated sidewall pressure cold.


6

tl;dr: it depends. Usually bigger wheels + thinner tires = higher pressure. So, should one keep the pressure to what's recommended by the manufacturer regardless of the tire dimensions? Sort of. If the manufacturer has a recommendation for your wheel and tire dimensions, you should definitely start with those. If your new wheels are bigger (and the ...


13

In almost all circumstances you should use the manufacturer's numbers as your guide. They are aware of the requirements of their wheels, and they do understand that a low profile requires a certain pressure to resist damage. This doesn't necessarily need to be a higher pressure (although it sometimes is) because the wheel construction also needs to be ...


2

I would suggest you check your brakes first. This is usually a main suspect in loud noises if all other aspects are fine. Then it would also benefit you get a suspension check done at a tire fitment centre. They would be able to tell you if it something more complex such as ball joints, CV's, steering rack bushes giving in or any other part behaving ...


3

Tires heat up quickly during the first bit of driving. The heating tends to soften the rubber which changes how it contacts the road surface. How the tread blocks contact the road changes the sounds produced. Tires vary greatly in design and materials which both affect the noise produced. Name brand expensive tires are carefully engineered to make a "white ...



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