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1

If you think the alignment is off, take it back to the shop and have them double check it for you. They could have made a mistake ... it does and can happen. They should have given you an alignment report which would give you the before/after shot of what the alignment looked like. Make sure all of these numbers are in the green. If they didn't give you an ...


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I usually check it weekly as you do lose 3 PSI or so You can also go to your local tyre dealer and they may sell nitrogen which is a lot better then normal air, as the compounds are a lot thickers and cant easily escape nitrogen check = 3-6 months normal air check = 1-4 weeks


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Well it depends upon you and your car maintenance which will determine how long your tire pressure will remain. Most people check their car functions including the car pressure using home tools every week. So it is depends upon you to check the tire pressure. As my friend who is a mechanic in auto repair shop told me that there is no problem in checking ...


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This topic is pretty covered, but instead of using normal air, ask your tyre dealer to put nitrogen in your tyres. The compounds are a lot thickers and don't leak out as much as air does. My weekly air pressure checks are now every 3 months which it will only go down by 3 PSI.


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Apart from alignment balancing your car may shake alot or beeng difficult to control if your v arms a not tighten, a small movement of v arms can realy cause, problems,,


1

Black Circles has a tyre rating guide: You can see a V is rated to 149mph whereas a T is only rated to 118mph. How fast are you thinking of travelling? If you are concerned about the XL rating (which just stands for Extra Load) this really comes down to how much you load the vehicle. They have stronger sidewalls to resist deformation - useful for a ...


1

Cyclists know the answer to this only too well... They use the maximum pressure the tyre will allow, when racing or time-trialing (say 140 psi) But the ride is so bumpy. When training they let their tyres down to 80-90 psi for the comfort, and better road-holding, at the expense of more effort required. (i.e. a worse mpg.)


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Thanks for all the input on this. Most of what I read out there talked about importance of maintaining the diameter, so that is why I was on mission to find the closest. My OEM setup, 18 x 8 (offset 55), 235/45R18 Good Year Eagle F1 Asymmetric 2. According to Good Year website, diameter is 26.3 with 793 revs per mile, load index 98, load range XL, max ...


1

I'll say one thing to you, don't do the math ... let some place like tirerack.com do it for you. It has been my experience that one tire manufacturer's numbers (ie: 225/50R17) do not match another. There is only one true way to evaluate tire diameter and that is with the industry standard of Rotations Per Mile (RPM). When you look at tire brands/models, ...


2

As you're changing rims from 18" down to 17" i would say its more important to get tyres which are the correct width for your new rims before worrying about the profile/OD. (You haven't mentioned it but are the rims the same width?). At a guess the tyre shops might also be recommending the 225's because they may be a more common size. Did you ask them ...


2

Your warranty is actually pretty hard to Void even though many people talk about it. The dealer will push back, but if you know your rights, you will win every time so long as you are within reason. I'd suggest reading about the Magnuson–Moss Warranty Act which specifically states that modding a vehicle doesn't void the warranty unless that part can be ...


3

First of all, the short amount of driving you do prior to getting them refilled is not going to cause the tire itself any problems. The biggest problem you'll see with tires which are run low is the amount of heat build-up in the rubber. Not only is the low pressure not really that low, the distance you drive is not enough to cause you worry. Secondly, I'd ...


4

No, this should not void your warranty as long as the replacement tires are the same size as the stock ones. I'm not even sure the size really matters that much (within reason). Something most people do with winter snow tires is buy a set of separate wheels and have the snow tires mounted on them, that way when you go to change back, you can change them at ...


1

It's impossible to give an answer to this question without knowing how much "low" means in this case. If the tire is really flat or anyhow visibly low, I'd recommend against running it. Even a few miles driven carefully, which will probably represent no risk for you or other road users, may invisibly damage the tire. If the tire is just a little on the low ...


1

Nylogrip ZRY is the model. 100/80 is the width in mm and 80 the height as a percentage of the width. Going to a 90/90 will change the arc profile and affect turn-in on the bike. R15 means the wheel is 15 inches in diameter. You should ensure you meet the manufacturers criteria for tyres as insurance companies have been known to cause issues if you fit an ...


0

Your tyre pressures quoted by the manufacturer are optimal for best service from any tyre. If a tyre is run at a low or very low pressure then what happens is an increase in the flexing of the tyre wall. This extra flexing of the tyre wall destroys the tyre from the inside and is not visible on a mounted tyre. It is dangerous to drive on a flat or near flat ...


1

For what it's worth, I once noticed my wife's 2007 Camry had tires that looked low after a drive one day (never a good sign on high-profile 215/60/R16 tires). Sure enough, they measured at 16-18 lbs. each, or half of what Toyota wants. It never triggered the low tire pressure light. You should actually measure the tire pressure on your Camry and see how low ...


4

You're probably fine. Keep an eye on your handling and braking distances. Add a bit of air as soon as is feasible and see if the light goes out. It's possible that you just edged below the low-pressure warning on a colder day than your car is used to. The lower temperature results in a lower pressure inside the tire (hooray for Boyle's Law!). I had a ...


1

Going to a 205 width tire, you would need to move to a smaller profile ratio - which would be a 55, in order to get close to the original tire height. Typically, going to a wider tire hampers original performance. Wider tires weigh more, have a wider contact patch, so it takes more force to move (increased fuel consumption), and harder for it to channel ...


1

TireRack has an article specifically on this topic http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=52 -- edit: just found this: http://www.michelinman.com/mediabin/Approved/Michelin/Visuals/Digital/Two_Tire_Poster_Michelin_042009.pdf


1

The rubber compounds in winter tires are designed to remain flexible in colder temperature (as well as any other fancy technology the manufacturer may incorporate). Even on dry pavement, tires designed to remain firm at very warm temperatures become very hard at cold temperatures. DAGS on "7 degrees C winter tires" and you will find lots of articles ...


1

The short answer is that it depends. I drive around in what is likely a similar climate: the winters are chilly but huge snows are unlikely. Instead, we will often get between a light dusting and an inch of snow. In that sort of weather, all weather tires have suited me fine. They do not perform as well in the snow as dedicated snow tires (as I said in ...


0

Where I live here in the States, we usually have winter snows which fall every year. Not a great amount, but enough to wreak havoc upon the locals. We utilaize good all-season radials year round with no ill effect. Most new cars here tend to come with all-season radials (unless it's a specialty vehicle). These types of tires are just as described and can be ...



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