New answers tagged

0

Could that be plugged with a proper internal plug? Absolutely Could that be plugged with a temporary cord plug? Sure, thick cord plugs with extra cement would do that. I've plugged bigger holes than that using cord, but it'll eventually start leaking again as the cement weathers out of the fabric. I've no insight into what you expect as an owner/driver, ...


2

There are two common, basic methods of tire hole fixing. The easy, cheap solution is to get a $5 kit from any auto store. The kit with the rubberish cord-like things that you shove in the hole from the outside. These work fairly well, especially if you aren't going to keep the car/tires a long time or drive a lot in real weather (e.g. snow/ice and 100+ ...


1

You can plug that hole with no problems. Most Auto-Zone type places sell a generic plug kit, with a T-type corkscrew driver, plugs and glue. So what I might do is plug it like that BUT also glue a gaiter on the inside just to be sure. ALSO, If i was a little doubtful, possibly swap the tyre out with the spare.....use in emergency only....which means also you ...


2

I have had a larger puncture repaired with a tire plug. As long as the repair is properly done (i.e. no air leaks) you should be fine


0

I was thinking of using Smittybilt COMPAIR Compact which holds 10 gallons @ 175psi. The claim is that CO2 will fill about 10x as many tires compared to compressed air. Regardless of which is a better gas for tires, will 10 gallons of nitrogen fill more or less tires compared to 10 gallons of CO2? From what I gather CO2 compresses apx 10 times more volume ...


6

The Rubber Manufacturers Association rules say that a hole larger than 1/4" cannot be repaired (https://rma.org/tire-safety/tire-repair). So if your measurement is accurate, it's unlikely you'll find a shop willing to repair the hole - they may be legally liable if there was any issues afterwards. If it was my wife's car, I'd have no problem with (a) ...


3

Try a different shop, they should be able to patch it. A hole this big at the bottom of a groove is less critical than the same hole on the rolling surface.


0

It's not the fact that it's "steel" that is the potential issue. It's the "generic" part. Toyotas want hubcentric wheels. If you have the wrong bore size (too large), then you've turned it into lugcentric and run a higher risk of breaking wheelstuds/having balance/vibration issues.


3

Lower spec Toyota Camry's often had steel wheels as standard. It's very common to have a steel set with winter ties for winter use. With a 1997 car, it'll be harder to find a decent set of alloys than it will steel wheels. I'd ignore the 'guy in the auto shop'.


6

I prefer steel rims - less troubles with balancing. Talking about bolts for steel and aluminium wheels - they should have different bolts. Alloy wheel bolts have longer thread and cone shape (on the right). Steel rim bolts have shorter thread, and a spheric shape (on the left). So if you buy steel rims, make sure you buy bolts. Sometimes too long can ...


0

You probably have a limited range of tire size options (perhaps only one size) you can fit on the existing rims - you'd have to check with a tire dealer. There are cases where different makes/models of tires of exactly the same size will deliver different ride and handling qualities. Again, you'd have to check with a dealer. Just bear in mind that a more ...


2

It depends on where the valve was leaking from. I would of asked to see the old TPM units if that's not what they showed you. If it was leaking around the schrader valve, it's possible they didn't replace the valve with a new one. This won't necessarily cause a leak but if the neoprene seal on the valve is damaged it can leak. It's also possible that the ...


4

Your first major red flag is "you'll fail inspection, but if you let us fix your car RIGHT NOW you'll get your sticker!" All joking aside (not so much a joke..), it's unlikely these would both go bad. I have a 2007 vehicle that has original valve stems with no corrosion/rot at all (not garaged, I'm in Natick). It's quite possible they just threw the rims ...


5

Devin- Jeeps are off-road vehicles are NOT meant to have a soft ride. With that being said, no matter what tire you throw on it the ride quality will not change in this way. When I bought my Wrangler, I had the same tires you are referring to- Goodyear Wranglers. After about a year I swapped my tires to 265/75 r16 BFG All Terrain TA KO2 (original rim). I ...


3

I would not think more sidewall would help. The 75 denotes that you have a large amount of sidewall as it is. I would think the best place to look for a softer ride is the springs and shocks. The tire you pick will not effect how straight the vehicle drives. If it is pulling, you need an alignment. Personally, I would look on a website like tirerack....


1

Steel wheels will inevitably rust if significant measures aren't taken, especially if you live in the 'Canadian Rust Belt" - the Maritimes, as do I. I just completed restoring a set of 6 bolt steel wheels that I picked up for my minivan. I have a couple sets of aftermarket steel wheels that are 5 - 6 years old without a speck of rust. They do however require ...


0

This is my testimony. I'm not bragging in any way and will not suggest that anyone take my experience to make a confirmed decision. This was only done in an emergency, well prayed up, situation. My tire blew out in San Antonio Texas and I replaced it with a donut. I drove from San Antonio to VIDALIA GA (mostly via I-10) driving in excess of 70 mph at times. ...


4

you can try one of the flat repair product in a can (Fix-a-Flat etc.) They can be a problem with some tire pressure monitoring systems though. The best method is to have a tire shop remove the tire clean the inside of the rim. Then they can apply a product that seals the bead.


1

Nitrogen is cheaper because it's readily available in the air, and can be extracted with a rather compact nitrogen generator. Extraction of carbon dioxide from the air is inefficient, so it has to be produced by burning fuels (such as methane) or via thermal decomposition of limestone.


14

Nitrogen is inert and doesn't affect rubber or the steel rim. Carbon dioxide is highly reactive and affects both the rubber by causing swelling in the rubber. It also would cause corrosion in iron based rims (particularly Carbon- Steel). Edit: When CO2 is mixed with moisture becomes Carbolic acid which is corrosive. It all depends on concentration. It is ...


0

Nitrogen is a very predictable gas. All of its behaviors have been tested rigorously over many many years. As such they can predict the behavior much more easily than a mixed gas. Also, its performance is very similar to air. If you were unable to have access to a bottle of nitrogen, you could still use normal air and still be close to the original ...


10

Nitrogen makes up around 80% of Air - therefore its more readily reclaimed and separated than the smaller amounts of other gases in air. I.e. the process for reclaiming nitrogen from air could be less efficient than that of reclaiming CO2 from air and still be cost effective. Additionally its stability at higher temperatures means its behaves more ...


1

Look, I agree with the tyre rack article to a certain extent. But let's all use a little common sense. Using their example (as I do) in rotating my full size spare on my Wrangler. Even when I swap out at every tyre rotation the act of not using 1 tyre for that set of 5000 miles creates a tyre circumference difference of about 1/8" of an inch. So by there ...


1

Since the tire change seems to be the onset of the problem, my first suspicion would be that one or more of the wheels aren't properly balanced. It's possible your mechanic's balancing machine isn't working correctly, or that one of the small weights placed on the wheel has fallen off. You may consider going to another shop and having them verify the ...


2

If your tire was burning you'd know it, and it wouldn't stop when you stop the car. If you have a rear wheel drive car then it could be from the drivetrain, but I would bet it's the parking brake. Parking brakes usually work on the rear wheels, either with a separate set of calipers and pads, or by clamping the main brakes. It could also be a stuck brake ...


2

If the rubber burns, you wouldn't say 'possibly'. I'm sure you'd recognize a smell of a rubber, so I have to guess it is brake shoe/pad, most likely hand brake cable or shoe or slave cylinder issue, depends on a car model.. Unless you have 1000 hp engine.. ;)


2

This damage is not acceptable. Water could get into the inner layers of the tire that contain the steel belts and corrode them which can lead to tread separation. Tread separation would result in tire failure that could lead to loss of control of the vehicle. Proper tire repair standards require that the hole be plugged to seal against water intrusion into ...


4

With the wires snapped like that I would not trust its structural integrity any more. I feel similarly to tlhingan - tyres are one of your most important safety features. You should never compromise on them! Replace now. Don't wait until something catastrophic happens.


0

I don't see it as a massive hole. I'd keep driving, but still make sure my spare tire is ready for a job.


1

Tires are really important to me as they are the only part of the car touching the ground. So with tire damage this extensive, I would replace the tire, even a pair of tires if I can't find the same make and model.



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