New answers tagged

5

I think you have pressure loss on your bead, pressure sensor or Schrader valve Regardless of the tire holding N2 or straight atmospheric gasses, all of the same principles apply to pressure loss. You need to have a good seal on all of the components of the rim. Bead of tire on rim Seal of any pressure sensors Seal of the Schrader valve Seal of the valve ...


5

tl;dr: As this is a front wheel drive car and you're taking about replacing one of the rear tires, it sounds like you'll be fine replacing a single tire. The key facts of your situation are that: You're driving a front wheel drive car without a differential to worry about in the rear. Your tires are long-lived commute-only. Given those two points, I'd ...


1

There are two types of tire pressure control systems. The simpler and cheaper one compares the average rotational speed of all four wheels, which is already measured by the anti-lock system. If pressure is low on one tire, the tire will bulge and sit a bit deeper on the road. The effective radius / circumference is smaller, and so the average rotational ...


0

I am from a country that does not have regulations on the minimum tire tread needed for a vehicle to be on the road and we routinely drive well past the wear indicators until they resemble slicks. On dry roads there is no issues except for slight risk of blow out at highway speeds. On wet roads quite dangerous. Deadly at highway speeds. Drive on those tires ...


2

In the worst case, using an expired tyre can be fatal - as the rubber ages, it perishes (dries out), and becomes weaker and brittle. At speed, it heats up and the pressure increases (as the air inside also heats up). This can lead to a blowout - there is a well known case in the UK where a classic car owner had 25 year old 'new' (i.e. previously unused) ...


6

Short answer: Yes, yes and yes. BUT: A tire doesn't have an expiry date. The reason for all three points is that the rubber gets harder over time and looses its grip / traction, especially on wet ground. Keep in mind grip is not only important for acceleration and braking, but it also keeps the car on the street in curves. Rubber not only gets harder, but ...


2

I used to work at Sears Automotive Center and the answer about aspect ratio was spot on. I had customers coming in all the time wanting to deviate from manufacturer specs, and they really didn't want to hear that improper tires size can damage their cars. When they would get an $1800.00 repair bill for differential damage. ...I would be forced to remind them ...


0

Steel rims are cheaper to replace than alloy wheels. Alloy wheels tend get damaged by the salt and can develop air leaks around the tire beads. Steel rims you can paint with tremclad type of paint to deal with the rust prior to mounting tires. Steel rims are also full rims which help protect the brakes from ice,snow and salt. Alloy rims don't offer the same ...


3

Rain or shine, I would never drive on tires with 2/32nds of an inch of tread. Here are just some of the problems: Your emergency stopping distance is greatly increased. Your risk of out-of-control hydroplaning is greatly increased. You are much more susceptible to road hazards going through the tread. Your traction is reduced on all surfaces.* Your ...


2

Depends...how much is your life worth? If you're going to be driving in rainy weather and just cannot replace your tires, I strongly suggest renting a car. As @Moab indicates, it takes little water on the road to cause tires with a mere 2/32nds of an inch of tread to hydroplane. I seem to recall a Mythbuster episode where they showed that such a tire would ...


9

As long as you don't have "threads" showing through the rubber, you should be OK. Be aware that you do have less traction, and need more time for braking, but you're not on borrowed time until the belts show. Rain will be an issue, but if you know your car is under-performing a lot of the danger is taken away. That said, drive defensively. Leave yourself ...


7

How Long? No time left, 2/32 is recommended depth they should be replaced Rain? You have a good chance of losing control of the vehicle if it hydroplanes on the water, and 2/32 does not leave much room for the tires to not hydroplane.


3

Yes, tire squealing under high brake loads is usually worn out tires, but may also have something to do with the tire compound, tire inflation and road temperature.


1

Going by the results of tests carried out by consumer organizations: no-name/unknown-brand tires often don't perform as well as the well-known brands. Worse: performance tended to be uneven. Cheap tires that worked well in the dry would have 2x the stopping distance of all the others in the wet, for example. There are outliers, both positive and negative of ...


3

In Europe, only tires with an EU Tire Label are allowed to be sold. Big brands were initially happy for the introduction of this label, but were disappointed about the results. Those "crap" Chinese tires were performing almost equal with the big brand tires, but cost half as much. A lot people say "it's your safety don't do it". The companies would be very ...


8

That looks like stone damage to me - I think if it was deliberate it'd be a much cleaner cut, and wouldn't have the scuffs and marks around - I'd say it has done a fair few miles between the initial damage and it finally failing.


6

Fun fact: the average mid-sized car tire sees ~800 revolutions per mile, so every component of a 50k mile tire must endure more than 40 million loading/unloading cycles! (note: some tires are not guaranteed for 50k miles). Source + testing information can be found in the PDF titled 'The Pneumatic Tire' on this page. Regardless of mileage rating, all tires ...


6

In the US, the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) is the governing body that controls testing and specifications of motor vehicles. They mandate that a certain set of standardized tests are carried out on all tires sold for highway use. Tires that are made for off-road equipment and possibly some trailers might not have to undergo the ...


2

I'd combine the answers from @Jphi1618 and @Jsn - use a Dremel or similar to cut almost all the way through - up one side, across the top and back down the other side. You can then use a screwdriver or a nut splitter to split the cap in half - hopefully without having to cut far enough to ruin the threads on the stem. Some damage to the threads will be ...


3

It turns out that you do want them on the rear. And one of the reasons is probably not what you would expect. It turns out that it's important that the front tires lock up first when braking hard, for example, in wet weather. That sounds backwards, I know. You might think, I want the rear's to lock up so they hold the rear end back and keep me from ...


9

Fellow idiot here. Penetrants won't work. Get a hacksaw with a very fine metal blade and saw away. Use a screw driver to pry open both sides when you have enough clearance. You need to cut the top and one of the sides.


5

Drill a hole in the top of the cap and squirt your favorite rust eater in there, this way you can soak it from both sides of the thread. Also some gentle heat will draw the lube into the threads.


6

If using some sort of penetrant doesn't help loosen up the caps, you can cut them down the side with a Dremel tool. You will mess up the threads on the valve stem a little, but they will replace the stems when you get new tires anyway, so its not a big deal. I would cut down one side, being careful not to go too deep, then try to pry the cap open by ...


12

Officially, the better tires go on the rear to help prevent oversteer. If you front tires loose traction (understeer), you are going to go straight until you catch traction, or hit something. Its safest to hit something with the front of your car. If you oversteer, it is much more difficult to recover. You are more likely to hit things with the side or ...


11

Given that it sounds like they have rusted to the valve stems, you could try soaking the threads and the whole area with PB Blaster specifically. I have seen it work really well, and could be better than Liquid Wrench. Although that does work well too. And when I say soak I mean overnight. It's not like you can use heat to loosen them up, you'll melt the ...


7

As you may well know: when you're turning, an under-steer condition is when the front tires lose grip and start to slide, and an over-steer condition is when the back tires loose grip and start to slide. For the inexperienced driver, under-steer conditions are much easier to control, as you can still see where you are heading, and can simply straighten the ...


6

It really depends. If the car is front wheel drive, then you are expecting your front wheels to do all of the following well: Apply power to the road Steer Do the bulk of the stopping Sounds like you would want the newest and best tires on the front. In a rear wheel drive car, if the front lose traction you're going to under steer in a wet corner. (If ...


5

Used tires, how can I be sure that they are roadworthy? Asked what vehicle they came from if possible. Aside from looking at the general appearance, how do I properly inspect the tire(s)? Make sure no bulges exist: Make sure the tire's are not dry rotted: Look to see if any metal is showing on the inside or surrounding of the tire or if ...


5

Since the tire is used, having a way to check the tread depth is going to be important, and if you are buying a set of two for a single axle, make sure you can get two that have the same amount of tread so you don't put extra strain on your differential (assuming driven wheels). If you're getting one tire, try and match the remaining tread on your existing ...


5

I've even been told that you have to get the alignment done when the tires are new so they will allow the wheels to sit evenly and that worn tires will invalidate the alignment process since the wheels would then be "aligned" to the wear pattern. This is not true; the tire wear pattern has no affect on the measurements or adjustments. If the ...


1

I have had a similar experience of the rear off side tyre disintegrating on the highway. The car was mainly used for short distance city travel only. First noticed a vibration from the rear of the car and by the time got to the shoulder to check the tyre was heated up and shredded. Maybe about half a km. I guess even a few rotations with the edge of the rim ...


5

You can get an alignment at any time. It's often a good idea to get one when you get new tires, just so you don't mess them up if you have any alignment issues. However, you should also get one done if you have any kind of suspension work done (new shock absorbers, new tie rods, etc.) While you probably don't need to have one done if your tire wear is even, ...


5

In general, you get the least trouble when the circumference of the new tire is close to the old tire. So when you move to bigger rims, you also need lower-section tires. You can use a tire size calculator to find a combination that works well. When the circumference of the new tire is much larger than the old one, your speed will be higher at the same ...



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