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-1

You want to lift up the front end and shake the tyres horizontally and vertically. If there are any play, some suspension bushings or steering components need replacing. if there are play in any direction, the hub is bad.


4

If there is a defect in the tire, there is a tire manufacturers warranty which applies. You should not have to pay to have it replaced. As long as you don't have appreciable wear on (which 3300 miles should not create), you should be just fine with a new replacement. The car should drive just the same with a new replacement.


0

If you cannot feel the vibration in the steering wheel it is unlikely that the problem will be related to wheel balance or alignment. The symptoms described sound awfully similar to what I recently experienced with my Touareg after it came back from a two-week dealership visit; I could feel severe vibrations over a range of speeds (and in reverse) on ...


1

I think the problem may be the torque converter in the transmission. According to this article on Class Actions News, there was a lady who had a similar issue on their 2005 Odyssey which they brought class action lawsuit against Honda for this problem. There was a Technical Service Bulletin (TSB) which was issued for 2007, 2008, and some 2009 Odysseys (but ...


0

You should be able to add one by adding a t-piece into the high-pressure line and adding a gauge to the T. I'd have hoped that someone would have made a ready-made one that wouldn't involve modifying the pump, but I can't find one, so I think you'd have to make your own. On that basis, you'd need: a t-piece with the same internal diameter as your pump's ...


0

What they person at the tire store said is completely plausible. To make sure, I'd take the car to a different mechanic and ask the same question. Also, have them show you exactly where the tread is breaking loose so you know for sure and they aren't just pulling your leg.


0

The damage comes from your differential heating up excessively due to increased load. If you drive slow and keep it short, you can go on for months or even years without a problem. You'll only have a problem if you go on a roadtrip.


2

Wrap a tape measure around the tube. Do this enough times with different sizes, and you'll find a pattern. From that pattern, you can derive a formula. Or try this: based on the rim size and profile of the wheel this tube goes into, you can determine the height of the tube. From that, using Pi, you can derive the circumference.


0

I agree with Daniel, and also comfirmed this with Audi. As long as they are the same size and there isnt a major difference in thread wear you should be fine.


0

As Nick said there are wear indicators. Most will have little arrows on the side wall to show you where the indicator bars or raised areas are. On the side of wall of tires there is the date of manufacture stamped as 4 digits. The first two represent the week in the year it was manufactured and the last two the year. May be difficult to spot at first but ...


0

The width should be the same width as the one you are replacing. If you don't, it will mess with the stability of your vehicle, how the tire wears, and could possibly (down the line) cause tire failure ... That's probably a little over dramatic, but a possibility. This is, of course if you are just replacing one wheel. If you are replacing them all, width is ...


0

I've speed read this so excuse duplication. Service history is important. Make sure all stamps are present and consider calling the garage(s) who stamped them to confirm each service took place. You're spending a lot of money on the car. When you've lined up the final choice, I'd consider spending a few hundred more and get the RAC or AA to inspect it. ...


0

Checking the battery requires a battery tester and disconnecting the battery; the next best manner is to hook the car up to the correct service equipment and confirm it is the right battery for the car and use any test protocols available on the equipment and car, meanwhile also checking the charging system. After that, use 'close visual inspection': look ...


7

Tyre depth gauges look something like this (amazon link) - you can buy them in any automotive store. You press the green bit against the tyre and push the middle bit into the tread groove. The slidy bit at the top will then tell you the depth. Buy one and have a play, it's easier to see than to explain! You should be able to see the 'wear bars' - raised ...


8

The below are very easy checks you can do while buying a used car.(from anywhere for that matter of fact) Engine This is the most complicated/expensive part to maintain/replace. Head Gasket check: Open the oil filler cap or the dip stick for any milky white substance , like mayoneese ,if it is present then stay away , it means the head gasket is ...


1

In the UK we have tyre fitters that specialise in Part Worn tyres. If you have similar in your local area then it would be worth asking them to measure your remaining tread and see if they have a suitable replacement tyre instead of having to buy a full set. That's certainly what I would try first.


0

Take a measuring tape and wrap it around your tires. Then wrap it around one of the potential new tires. If the circumference of the new tire is within 1/4 inch (6mm to 7mm) of the others, don't worry about it. You may also have a bit of luck looking at the local classifieds section. Sometimes people sell off tires with a good bit of tread left on them when ...


0

As I was doing the penny test I noticed a second tear in the side wall so the tire need to be replaced for sure. And unless I'm doing the test wrong it looks like the tred is low anyway so I'll probably replace all 4. Thank for all your help.


1

What I said over here might apply to your situation: ... a mismatched tire won't break your drivetrain immediately. It's more subtle than that: at least one differential will be loaded all of the time and at all operating speeds. So, instead of managing the different rotation speeds in a relatively low speed turn, you'll be cooking your ...


0

As all 4 tires are same in your car all rotate at same speed(particular condition) they also brake at similar speed but it you use smaller tires at rear they will rotate at comparatively at higher speed causing faster wear for tires as well as brakes(your car is not having Disc at rear) so I would recommend you to stick to originals and other reasons are ...


1

This would depend a great deal on the load carried and the tyre pressure. The tyres will Flex and bulge somewhat and can fail if allowed to rub against the chassis. My trailer has a couple of inches clearance.


2

The damage you are showing is minor cosmetic damage. If the following occurs with sidewall damage, then get it replaced: Tire deflation (cannot be legally repaired in most countries) You pull the flap back and see damage to the side wall plies (corded area under the rubber which supports the tire) whether deflation has occurred or not Bulging of the tire ...


2

this area of the tire looks like a rubber ridge designed for style Wrong, This part of the tyre protects sharp objects from getting into the inner more structural parts of the tyre. The damage to your tyre does not seem too critical to cause any immediate change to driving or safety. That said if any sharp objects hit the wall in this particular area ...


1

It is normal for tires to wear faster on the inside. When the alignment is done, the camber is set negative, so the tires lean slightly inward. They are typically more negative on the rear to help avoid oversteer. As for the clank - under what conditions do you hear it? going over bumps, in turns, braking, accelerating? can you recreate this noise while ...


3

As pointed out by @JuannStrauss, a spare tyre that is stored inboard of the vehicle will degrade more slowly over time than one of the regular wheels since it is not exposed to: normal wear & tear from vehicle motion other physical aggression (hitting a curb) winter salt heating in summer UV light All of these dry out the tyre composants and degrade ...


1

It will degrade over time, but at a much slower rate because it's not exposed to the elements like the other four are.


2

There is a very simple answer. The friction co-efficient on the paint lines is lower than the pavement. It's pretty common on almost any paint line in any state within the Union. That being said, some road racing governing bodies like the FIM and FIA force circuits to use a particular type of paint with grit in it that has a higher friction co-efficient ...


2

There are a number of factors that could contribute to this happening. Improperly inflated tires If your tires aren't inflated correctly for their size and the weight of your vehicle they may not have a proper contact patch with the road. Very Soft (sport) tires Very soft tires are great for gripping a rough surface like concrete or asphalt. They kind ...


0

Your tyres are probably way too hard. Either because their "energy savers" or because they're very old and are starting to perish (your first clue is tiny cracks in the side wall and/or little shiny spots).



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