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Do not go under the LOAD RATING. Use the manufacturer's recommended load rating as a minimum, and do not go under that minimum. In some cases, you will "feel" the car ride differently, and it can even begin to handle dangerously (wallowing in turns, back-end kick-out, etc). This can increase risk of spinout a high speeds, as well as increasing rollover ...


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One reason is that cars are heavier than they used to be due mostly to safety and emissions requirements. My 2003 Mini (not all that new) a car weighs 2800ish pounds replaced a 2200ish pound 1985 Civic that was pretty similar in size (the Civic actually had slightly more interior room). Heavier cars need bigger tires.


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I don't think it's possible to recalibrate the systems for a different tire size, but it shouldn't be necessary for such a small change. Most emergency spare tires are smaller than the standard vehicle tires and they don't hurt anything. That said, be careful if your vehicle has a limited-slip differential or all-wheel drive, those can be damaged if you have ...


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I presume you live in india , Both of your tire choices are good but they have their own advantages and disadvantages. Michellin Sirac(I personally owned this one): Advantages: An extremely good tyre for performance as they have softer compounds , they have high stability and you can acheive a better top speed like +3 or +4 to your current top speed and a ...


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I believe it's simply to keep up with trends . They see what's being done with cars by the generations that have passed. Each year new AFTER MARKET parts become new hot accessory, like TV's, chrome molding, & bigger rims. Gotta stay current, target the younger or more adventurous souls. Why should they allow you to spend more money with someone else when ...


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I had the same issue. One tire needed to be replaced, tire store told me I had to replace all 4. Not wanting to give up good money for no reason, fearing they were just trying to get more money out of me, research led me to replace all 4 for better peace of mind and for a longer lasting Subaru. But the tire place did tell me if I purchased the insurance ...


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Are the new tyres of the same load rating (the 95 before the H) as the recommended ones? The primary issue with using a lower than recommended speed rating is legality, particularly relating to insurance. Obviously this will vary according to which country/state/jurisdiction you are in, for example in the UK you must declare this to your insurance company ...


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Here's the thing. Modern tires are pretty tough gizmos. They can stand up to a lot of abuse, even broken glass. You are right that the slower contact would be gentler, but you forgot a key ingredient ... it will also be gentler on the glass as well. When you are at speed and run over a piece of glass, you're not being gentle on the glass. It will more than ...


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It sounds as though the rear-end is too tight. There is a straight rod which runs through the back of the bike which holds the rear-end together. You can see it in the circled in this picture: If this isn't torqued correctly, it will cause drag on the rear end. Sounds like your's is torqued too much. Another area to look at is to see if the rear brakes ...


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If they match, can I change size? tl;dr: only slightly unless you also change your wheels. I generally start with Tire Rack's excellent tire database: ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT SIZES FOR: 2001 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON For that vehicle, you're looking at 225/60-16 (and they list 43 tires in that size right now). It is possible to adjust those two first numbers ...


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Well, it is due to improper wheel-alignment or even worse, a damaged frame, which had made the front and rear wheel go out of alignment. Misalignment between front and rear wheel can be caused due to: An Accident: As you mentioned that the motorcycle came with old tires, I assume you are not the first owner of the vehicle. So, the previous owner might have ...


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Normally a tire loses around 1-2 psi a month. However this figure is absolutely a generic statement. In real life, the figure depends upon various factors: How many miles/kms you drive daily? What is the condition of the road/tarmac that you generally drive on? What is your driving style? Aggresive or Defensive? Is there any puncture in your tires? ...


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The tire store manager is pretty much on the money. A better way to say it, though, might be: A normal tire can lose up to 2 psi a month. Why is this important? Every tire/wheel combo is going to be different in the rate at which they lose air pressure. There are several ways (besides a puncture) a tire can lose air pressure. Those might include a bad ...


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Stay with the tire size on the car. There are no benefits moving to a different tire as far as speed or traction goes, especially if you are driving in a sometimes wet or snowy climate. The type of tire you are looking for would probably be a Grand-Touring Tire. You need one which has a speed rating of S or better. That leaves you: S (112mph), T (118mph), U ...


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You'd ideally want a winter tyre with good grip in wet conditions. That's exactly what you should tell the shop when you go buy your tyres. Your tyre profile is high enough and your sizes are fine.


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Whilst the math in the question might make sense, with the front-wheel-drive cars, it would go in violation of the established practice of having the better-handling tyres on the rear axle in order to combat oversteer. Tire Tech Information - Where to Install New Pairs of Tires? As such, if rotation is delayed to 20k miles of a 60k mile tyre, and ...


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It sounds as though one of your tires may have a slipped belt. This is pretty hard to diagnose because there isn't any real physical manifestation of it except for one of more of your tires being out of round. I don't believe this shows up when doing the balancing because it's more of a rolling thing. You can, however, rotate the tires front to back and see ...


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Whether using directional or non-directional makes no difference in how a tire should wear nor its rotation schedule. The reason why is, it's the tread which makes it directional or non-directional, not the core of the tire, nor the rubber which is used. On Tirerack.com, they state: A directional (also called a unidirectional) tread pattern is designed ...


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It could be that the holes into which the wheel nuts fit are elongated, allowing the wheels to be off-centre ? Or ( dare I say it ) that the wheel nuts are loose Or a wheel/tyre could be elliptical. This should have been picked up by the balancing test but I guess it's possible for a wheel to be balanced but elliptical. You could check this by jacking the ...


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Regarding the warranty, the warranty would cover what it clearly states it will cover. I can't really answer that question. Regarding even tire wire and rotating as a strategy to achieve even wear across the tires, I'll try. In most vehicles on the road today, there is one power wheel. On my Toyota Tacoma it's the right rear. It wears faster as most of ...



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