New answers tagged

0

If it were me I would replace the tire. I've had a blowout in a sidewall before and it's no fun. The real question for me is how much I value my life, the lives of passengers, and those around me.


0

Same question, lots of answers. https://www.reddit.com/r/Cartalk/comments/137i4f/my_tire_sidewall_is_ripped_can_i_drive_with_it/ Notice the one response which suggests sealing the cut to stop water damage. However, the outer tire rubber doesn't hold the air, the inner liner holds the air in. Thus a tire puncture means the inner liner gets a hole, and the ...


3

although JPhi is right in what he says, he's also slightly wrong. If you have taken a chunk out of your sidewall it's not necessarily dangerous in the slightest, it only becomes dangerous when you can see the cords because that is what can cause the tyre to bulge and blow out. it is worth checking for any bulging after a 100 miles or so but if it's a part ...


6

Replace for sure. The sidewall is the most vulnerable part of the tire. The tire might be holding air for now, and you might be able to drive on it for a while, but it could "pop" at any time creating a very dangerous situation. Put the spare on immediately - don't risk a blow-out.


1

I guess it is not a general rule that tires are lose some pressure every month. Temperature changes creates pressure difference most of the time. Every 5.6 degree Celsius (10 F) equals 1 PSI. So, 32 PSI at hot summer day easily becomes 30 PSI when its get colder vice versa.. Note: Consider the temperature of the tire itself, ie. check them when they ...


1

It depends whether you like understeering or oversteering. I think understeering is more preferable over the other due to thing needs to be done to gain the steering control is simpler; slow down. Correcting/recovering the oversteer with over 1000 degree turn steering wheels nearly impossible. You need to be quick as a snake :) to introduce correcting ...


2

There are two factors to be considered on this matter; chemical aging and mechanical aging. Since the tires are made chemical compounds, chemical properties of the tires are changing with time. Grip level is decreasing due to the ultraviolet light from the Sun, heat and other environmental factors. For me a brand new tire produced 3 years ago is old enough ...


7

After taking it back to the shop, the mechanic diagnosed it as "the back tire inside rim wheel weights are rubbing" (apparently they didn't rub when those tires were in the front). So rebalance the rear wheels and I'm back in business.


4

A simple way to check that the compressor is working would be to try it out on your spare tire first. If you have one.


0

While you can force a reluctant tire on with more pressure, most tires should seat with 15 PSI, and forcing a tire on at a higher PSI has a higher risk of damage and danger to those nearby. If a tire won't seat at 15psi, examine the rim and tire, reapply lubricant liberally on the tire bead and wheel rim, and position the tire so it's as centered as you can ...


3

As was pointed out, the outer diameter isn't quite the same, but it's not a major problem. The sole distinction I would be worried about would be load range. For example, an E350 van most likely wants to have a LT, E load rated set of tires installed. However, if the tires on your Savanna are P rated (i.e. not Light Truck), I would not install those on your ...


1

https://tiresize.com/calculator/ Diameter is 4% smaller Width is about 9% smaller Since you are going to a smaller tire... The speedometer will read higher than your actual speed by about 4% You will not need to worry about rubbing. Traction may be less, but should be sufficient. I am not familiar with tire pressure monitoring systems, so I cannot comment ...


1

An MOT in the UK will test these things. For more details on how they test your car, see here. Your car will either get a pass or a fail for each one. If get a fail in any one of the categories, that will constitute a fail overall. They are not required to do any work on the car, not even adjust the tire pressure or replace a bulb. Some might be kind to ...


4

If the screw penetrated the sidewall, and it leaks when you pull the screw out, then a tire shop cannot and will not repair it. The sidewall of a tire is the thinnest place on a tire. A 1/2" long screw could easily penetrate through the sidewall. It is very usual for a nail or screw to enter a tire at any location (sidewall or tread) and not cause the tire ...


1

According to TireRack.com, your standard tire size is 195/65/15. This tire has a rotation per mile (RPM) of 832. The Michelin tire has an RPM of 836. This is only a difference of ~.5%, which is not a big deal. Using the two different tire sizes shouldn't cause you any issues. The major concerns here is to keep the same size tires on the same axle (front or ...


5

Sounds like an indirect TPMS. These can be easily damaged by tire-mounting machines. If one or both are damaged, you can get dash light staying on. If they're not damaged, sometimes they just need a reset, especially if you don't change all tires at once. Indirect sytems test revolutions, not pressure. So it will sense a problem if 2 front tires have ...


5

If I read your question correctly the sensors have not completely failed yet. The device that read the sensors is showing that the batteries in the sensors are getting low. These batteries are small, the size of watch batteries. An inertial switch wakes up the sensors when the tire begins to roll. They are expected to last 6 to 10 years in normal use. So at ...


1

According to the tire size calculator rpmerf linked to, the corolla setup will be about 2.4% smaller. What this mean? Your speedo will read 2.4% faster than it would on your stock tire. For exemple if the speedo read 100km/h you will be going 97.6km/h in reality. Will it fit Most likly yes it will fit. Since your car could come with tires up to 235mm ...


2

Correct Tire Pressures As @Random832 mentioned in the comments, the information for my 2004 VW Passat B5 was not in the door jam of the drivers' side, but rather it was actually on the inside of my fuel filler lid. Here is what it looked like: As you can see, the pressure here varies for the approximate amount of weight that the car is carrying, but also ...


4

Putting your best tires up front is the exact opposite of what every tire shop I've ever been to in the US will do. You should not put your best tires in the front unless you never drive in adverse conditions like rain or snow. This popular mechanics article sums it up pretty well: The truth: Rear tires provide stability, and without stability, ...


1

On a FWD car always have the best tyres on the front. The tyres on the front are going to do all the steering, handle all the acceleration forces and 80% of the braking. I would definitely want my best tyres for that. Any worries about bad tyres on the back causing over-steer are unfounded unless they are in terrible condition and you drive like a lunatic. ...


4

One of my tires will need replacing soon as well as it is almost at the legal limit. I have a good amount of tread left on my front two tires. I am going to replace all four tires as soon as the worst one is due for a replacement. I want to clarify that you should never replace only one tire on an axle, you must always replace them in pairs at least ...


3

In my personal experience, having used cheap tires myself once, I'd say don't put them on the rear. If you use them on the front, the car won't have as much breaking power and might tend to under steer. Both of these things can be compensated with a more defensive driving style. If the car starts to under steer you'll feel it and slow down. If your rear ...



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