New answers tagged

2

I'd combine the answers from @Jphi1618 and @Jsn - use a Dremel or similar to cut almost all the way through - up one side, across the top and back down the other side. You can then use a screwdriver or a nut splitter to split the cap in half - hopefully without having to cut far enough to ruin the threads on the stem. Some damage to the threads will be ...


3

It turns out that you do want them on the rear. And one of the reasons is probably not what you would expect. It turns out that it's important that the front tires lock up first when braking hard, for example, in wet weather. That sounds backwards, I know. You might think, I want the rear's to lock up so they hold the rear end back and keep me from ...


8

Fellow idiot here. Penetrants won't work. Get a hacksaw with a very fine metal blade and saw away. Use a screw driver to pry open both sides when you have enough clearance. You need to cut the top and one of the sides.


4

Drill a hole in the top of the cap and squirt your favorite rust eater in there, this way you can soak it from both sides of the thread. Also some gentle heat will draw the lube into the threads.


5

If using some sort of penetrant doesn't help loosen up the caps, you can cut them down the side with a Dremel tool. You will mess up the threads on the valve stem a little, but they will replace the stems when you get new tires anyway, so its not a big deal. I would cut down one side, being careful not to go too deep, then try to pry the cap open by ...


12

Officially, the better tires go on the rear to help prevent oversteer. If you front tires loose traction (understeer), you are going to go straight until you catch traction, or hit something. Its safest to hit something with the front of your car. If you oversteer, it is much more difficult to recover. You are more likely to hit things with the side or ...


11

Given that it sounds like they have rusted to the valve stems, you could try soaking the threads and the whole area with PB Blaster specifically. I have seen it work really well, and could be better than Liquid Wrench. Although that does work well too. And when I say soak I mean overnight. It's not like you can use heat to loosen them up, you'll melt the ...


7

As you may well know: when you're turning, an under-steer condition is when the front tires lose grip and start to slide, and an over-steer condition is when the back tires loose grip and start to slide. For the inexperienced driver, under-steer conditions are much easier to control, as you can still see where you are heading, and can simply straighten the ...


6

It really depends. If the car is front wheel drive, then you are expecting your front wheels to do all of the following well: Apply power to the road Steer Do the bulk of the stopping Sounds like you would want the newest and best tires on the front. In a rear wheel drive car, if the front lose traction you're going to under steer in a wet corner. (If ...


5

Used tires, how can I be sure that they are roadworthy? Asked what vehicle they came from if possible. Aside from looking at the general appearance, how do I properly inspect the tire(s)? Make sure no bulges exist: Make sure the tire's are not dry rotted: Look to see if any metal is showing on the inside or surrounding of the tire or if ...


5

Since the tire is used, having a way to check the tread depth is going to be important, and if you are buying a set of two for a single axle, make sure you can get two that have the same amount of tread so you don't put extra strain on your differential (assuming driven wheels). If you're getting one tire, try and match the remaining tread on your existing ...


5

I've even been told that you have to get the alignment done when the tires are new so they will allow the wheels to sit evenly and that worn tires will invalidate the alignment process since the wheels would then be "aligned" to the wear pattern. This is not true; the tire wear pattern has no affect on the measurements or adjustments. If the ...


1

I have had a similar experience of the rear off side tyre disintegrating on the highway. The car was mainly used for short distance city travel only. First noticed a vibration from the rear of the car and by the time got to the shoulder to check the tyre was heated up and shredded. Maybe about half a km. I guess even a few rotations with the edge of the rim ...


5

You can get an alignment at any time. It's often a good idea to get one when you get new tires, just so you don't mess them up if you have any alignment issues. However, you should also get one done if you have any kind of suspension work done (new shock absorbers, new tie rods, etc.) While you probably don't need to have one done if your tire wear is even, ...


5

In general, you get the least trouble when the circumference of the new tire is close to the old tire. So when you move to bigger rims, you also need lower-section tires. You can use a tire size calculator to find a combination that works well. When the circumference of the new tire is much larger than the old one, your speed will be higher at the same ...


3

I once stopped to help a couple of fellow motorists who had that kind of damage to their tire. In their case they had a small object (like a screw) stuck in the tire. So it seems they had gotten a slow leak which caused the tire to depressurize until the walls of the tire gave out. The rim looks fine from what I can see in the picture so I find no reason to ...


2

I have had alloy wheels in extreme cold time of winter, and the ice build up causes the wheels to become unbalanced. I don't know if this is because of the type of metal the wheel is, or the light weight of alloy. I now have steel wheels for my winter tires and alloy for summer. I suspect the unbalance comes from the light weight of alloy, but maybe alloy ...


10

If you look at more than just the sidewall, you'll notice the tread shoulder is heavily worn. This tire is well beyond 3/32 and verging on bald in most of the tread pattern. There is slight cupping that indicates habitual under inflation by 3-6 pounds. Another factor is that it looks like a lower profile tire (though hard to tell for sure from this angle), ...


8

Tires have a warranty on them from the factory. Its quite possible the rock went thru the tire, because of a defective steel belt underneath. And the tire company would be responsible for that manufacturing defect. Remember the warranty on the tires is not covered by the car company, it's covered by the tire manufacturer. Normally rocks just don't go ...


10

I've had the wall separate like that after a blow-out, just in the time needed to stop. My impression is that the rim sliced it as it drove flat. So, it doesn't take a "long time". Just going from freeway speed to stopping at the roadside is time and distance enough.


18

Why doesn't your friend believe his wife? The tire probably blew up when it hit a pothole or curb. She drove without noticing until it started to pull to the side. Probably a little while until she found a safe place to park. What's so unbelievable about the above scenario? You and your friend should chill out and be happy that she is OK. Blow outs can kill ...


16

From the look of the rim, it seems it may have been in contact with something ... that something may have been a curb or two. If so, this could have weakened the side wall, which caused catastrophic failure. Given other factors, like if the tire was low on pressure and was continued to be driven on, then this to could have exacerbated the situation. Hot ...


4

Only thing I can think of is that the sidewall was destroyed by a curb at just the wrong height, or something similar. You would have to be fairly oblivious to not notice that the drivers side rear of the car was no longer on a tire, but rater on the sidewall. I would guess it was something faster, like a sewer drain lip, curb, something that dug into the ...


35

This tire was driven on long after the blowout When there is sidewall separation from tread carcass like this it had to have been driven on longer than claimed. When a tire suffers pressure loss and the car compresses what's left of the tire there's a fold along the sidewall that, if driven on, heats up due to the bending and associated friction. Once the ...


0

Short of chopping and welding the boot floor, you could possibly create an artificial boot floor that sits higher than the existing one. Some outside the box alternatives are;


2

I put the tire in upside down and bolted it, measured how much higher it sat than the base, cut some 2x4s to support the panel and voila


5

Brake hard on smoother pavement or cement The smoother roadbed will have a better surface for you tires to slide across and in order to grab and release repeatedly to make the sound you are looking for. Tires squeal when they are grabbing the road surface and letting go thousands, if not more, times a second. The vibrating tire emits the sound as it goes ...


3

You will have to replace one or both wheels to make sure you have matching sizes on both sides. Note that in many jurisdictions having non-matching tyres on an axle will fail safety/roadworthyness inspections (or side-of-the-road checks)


6

I'm afraid the only way to resolve this is to get matching width wheels plus matching sized tyres across the back axle. Even with the same sized tyres on different width wheels, the effective surface and sidewall profile shown to the road will be different. You may have success trying to find a second hand set of wheels cheaply or even buy an incomplete ...


1

245/50r16 tyres are 30mm (just over 1") wider than 215/70r15. More of a difference is the diameter - 215/70r15 gives 26.85" or 682 mm, 245/50r16 is 25.65" or 651mm - just over 1", or 4.5% smaller - your speedometer will over-read by nearly 5%. Also bear in mind that you'll need new wheels for the 16" tyres (though that might be the whole reason you're ...


2

It really depends on what your stock gear ratio is. You mentioned you have a 2004 LJ (Wrangler Unlimited), which means it probably came with a 3.73 axle ratio unless you have the Rubicon, in which case it came with 4.10 gears. There should be a small metal tag on the rear differential that's stamped with your gear ratio, but it's not uncommon for that to be ...


3

This article gives an answer to your question with great details, unfortunately it is in italian. The summary is tires do get old through time even if not installed under a car for few different reasons, oxidation, sunlight exposition, loss of volatile oils, etc... The swiss touring club (TCS) and the german automobil club (ADAC) performed tests and ...


2

The testing for tires has components in them which I find nefarious and not realistic. I've never had a 60,000 mile tire last the anticipated distances. My driving 'style' is most probably the delta between the testing regiment and what I actually get out of a 60,000 mile tire.


9

When shopping for tires, some of them will have a mileage warranty, normally in the range of 40,000-70,000 miles. When a mileage number is listed, it is a pro-rated tread life warranty. When the tires are kept properly inflated, and rotated on a strict, verifiable schedule, they should give you the listed number of miles before the tread reaches the ...


5

I would assume it's a calculated estimate, based on an "average" wear rate for the compound used - I'd expect that they would run the tyre in controlled conditions for a certain mileage, measure the wear, and extrapolate out to give a full wear life. As with all these things, the controlled conditions of the test means it's unlikely that many people would ...


3

Thanks for the image. Depending on how deep that tear/slit is, you may have to either get it checked or patched. You can take a note of the pressure in the tire as it sits currently, then in a few days check if it has any loss (significant loss) of pressure, if so, then may have breached the cavity. If the tear/slit is not so deep, you could possibly pick ...


3

The TPMS sensor in each wheel does not come with new tires, it a separate part. There are TPMS reseal kits that are available separately, see picture below. The TPMS sensor is to be resealed each time a new tire is installed. This is industry best practice. It is not always done. It appears this was not done when your tires were installed or the new seals ...


4

Your automatic transmission is your weakest link The wear will primarily be in your automatic transmission. When starting from a stop your first gear is now considerably taller. When you first start to roll it takes the rear wheels longer to get the inner hub to the RPM's that full 1st gear engagement occurs because of the larger diameter of the rear ...


1

How long do you think the thread will last on this axle? If your answer is "not a whole lot" or "less than a year" then replace. If there's a fair bit of thread left, seeing as you've not cut any wires, just keep an eye on it. Keep in mind that the wires are now exposed to the elements so the lifespan of your tyre will be reduced.


3

It's pretty much up to you. But let me tell you something, in a period of my life I was so busy that I didn't have time to change my tires. It was so cut off that you could easily see the wires and I couldn't go above 70mph! The car was vibrating above that speed! Now I don't encourage you to drive in that condition. Especially if you are living in a country ...



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