Hot answers tagged

29

The only advice anyone could possibly give about this tire is that it should not be taken on the road. Out of respect for other peoples lives, the car should not be driven with even one tire like that on it.


22

Or is it fine to even go a little bit on the highway for a few days before I replace it? No. Please don't drive on that tire. You are seeing a large scale deformation in a portion of the tire that's not designed for point stresses like that. There's pretty clearly a thin layer of rubber standing between the marginally acceptable and explosively ...


21

While I believe the tire shop gives free rotation to get you in the habit of coming back to them every few months so they can sell you more, it can be important to rotate your tires. It all depends on the wear of the tires I have had sets of tires that wore extremely evenly and I only rotated them once. Other sets of tires I have had wore very unevenly ...


19

The tilt of the wheel is known as the camber angle. Tilting the wheel in that manner is called negative camber. Doing it the other way around (top outwards) is positive camber. Mounting the wheel with a negative camber improves grip under hard cornering as it counteracts rolling. On a completely level tire (0 camber), when a horizontal force is applied ...


18

The tyre code is as follows: An optional letter indicating the intended vehicle class. Your tyre doesn't have one (or you omitted it) but it should be a P for passenger car. Possible values are: P for Passenger Car LT for Light Truck ST for Special Trailer T for Temporary Digits before the slash indicate the tyre width in millimetres. Your tyre has a ...


17

Personally I wouldn't drive on that tire - if it delaminates while you're driving you're risking a blowout. You get bulges like that if the rubber basically separates from the various reinforcement plys in the tire and as the air in the tire heats up from driving, it'll slowly expand. All it takes then is something that pokes/cuts the bulge to turn your car ...


16

My wife had a similar problem on her car and it turned out the problem was the wheel, not the tire. We'd had enough sand and salt on the road this winter that she had corrosion / gunk building up right at the bead. The tire shop dismounted the tires, cleaned up the seating area on the wheel and then remounted the tire. The problem now seems to be solved.


16

Yes, you should fill your tire. The fact the other tires all are nominally correct means you should trust your gauge. Modern tires often have reinforced sidewalls that mask the appearance of low pressure. Waiting for a bad wear pattern is not a good plan, as then you'll have an unevenly worn set of tires.


15

Remember that lug nuts are exposed to literally every element that could possibly cause corrosion. It sounds like your last nut is stuck due to some rust or oxidation that you can't see. Here's how I generally approach a badly stuck nut: Check your safety gear: eye protection, jack stands, everything to keep yourself from getting killed when this wheel ...


14

Issues involving steering wheel vibrations problems usually are most noticeable at one or two narrow speed ranges (5-10mph and 60-70mph), and will decrease significantly, and in some cases, even disappear outside of these ranges. The amount of vibration caused by worn tires will often be seen over a broader speed range if the tire is worn more. The severity ...


13

The below are very easy checks you can do while buying a used car.(from anywhere for that matter of fact) Engine This is the most complicated/expensive part to maintain/replace. Head Gasket check: Open the oil filler cap or the dip stick for any milky white substance , like mayoneese ,if it is present then stay away , it means the head gasket is ...


13

Physics says: T2 p2 = (p1+p0) * ---- - p0 T1 If you have temperature T1 and pressure p1 when you filled the tires, you can calculate the new pressure p2 when the temperature changes to T2. Since pressure is measured relative to ambient air pressure, you also need that pressure p0. Though there are changes in ambient air ...


12

Winter tires in Winter and Summer tires in Summer. With very rare exception the "All-Season" tires are really only very good for 3-Seasons, or for places where the roads are always kept clear in the Winter. Do all 4. Having a mix of Winter/Summer tires will adversely affect handling and braking.


12

tl;dr: No. This sort of vehicle dynamics question best addressed by Racing Car Vehicle Dynamics What follows is a basic discussion at the high school physics level. As you will see from the reference text, high school physics is insufficient to statically model the complete vehicle system. A dynamic model is required to agree with easily obtainable ...


11

The reality is that snow tires live in a world of wet snow and salt. That's about the worst possible combination for corrosion. Your best bet in that situation is to dilute the salt-water solution, usually from straight water rinsing. Any remaining risk of corrosion will have been greatly decreased by your rinse. My inclination is to rinse off the tires ...


11

You can calculate the size of the effect from simple geometry. Tire wear reduces the diameter of the tire, which reduces the circumference of the tire. New passenger car tires typically come with 10/32" to 11/32" of tread depth (source). Tires are considered fully worn-out when only 2/32" of tread remains. So the tire has lost 8/32"--9/32" on the radius, or ...


11

First, the critical caveat: You are the driver. You have to make the decision. It ultimately doesn't matter what we say. Given, that, I would say NO, it is not safe to drive until the weekend. Get the broken tire fixed or replaced as soon as possible. You have two problems: Top speed limitation: the donut is top-speed rated for 50 mph (check the ...


11

Yes, wheel chocks would help in this case. Also, use of the emergency brakes as well as leaving it in gear (EDIT- Leave it in gear if a manual or park if automatic). If wheel chocks are not available, you could use a largish stone which could be wedged between the tire and the ground on both sides of the tire. This would be on a tire which is not flat and ...


11

I don't have and sources for this, so please, post 'em if you got 'em, but it's my understanding that H was originally used to designate either Highway rated tire or High speed. Even I'm not clear on this... Also, the letters I and O are commonly left out of lettering schemes because of their cousins, the numbers 1 and 0. And to speculate further, X is ...


11

On every car sold (that I'm aware of) there is a sticker pasted, usually in the door jam of the driver's side, which states exactly what the car manufacturer suggests your tire pressure should be at. It will give a front/back pressure. This is what you should use and not what the pressure on the side of the tire says. The figure on the tire is the maximum ...


10

Tire condition can be interpreted in several ways, visually being the most prominent. Usually excessive tread wear can be seen quite easily using the famous penny test (using an old penny, one where Lincoln's head doesn't overlap the outside edge of the coin). From Wikipedia: If part of Lincoln's head is covered by the tread, the tire has a legal ...


10

There are major benefits on a track: you have much lower tire deformation with a low profile tire so you can corner harder. You can also accelerate and brake harder, and your tires get to temperature much faster as there is less rubber to warm up. On a normal road having very low profile tires can be a negative - they don't soak up bumps as well as a higher ...


10

Looks like a Stabilizer Bar Link for your steering stabilizer.


10

Any tyre design is a balance between cost, grip, longevity, water displacement and rolling resistance. Change one, and chances are you'll adversely affect the others... Personally, I would always put grip and water displacement (which affects wet grip) above all the others on a priority list. The difference between those "fuel efficient" tyres and normal ...


10

The Info provided by COSTCO is on paper correct, if you were say using a tire with a speed rating of 118 mph (T), and you were in Germany cruising at 140 mph, the tire could overheat and cause this problem. However, in your case, you just had a flat tire driven on flat. If they check the tread, area, or the valve stem, from the take-off tire, they will ...


10

From what I have seen and read over the last few years the "general rule" has become best tires on the rear. In my opinion it is likely the result of litigation by people who were involved in skidding accidents. The theory as far as I understand it, is that with worn tires in the rear, the back end can loose traction and allow the rear of the car to attempt ...


10

Yes! They have lug nuts. There is a center cap which is removed to access the lug nuts. Center Cap Wheel


10

The tire store manager is pretty much on the money. A better way to say it, though, might be: A normal tire can lose up to 2 psi a month. Why is this important? Every tire/wheel combo is going to be different in the rate at which they lose air pressure. There are several ways (besides a puncture) a tire can lose air pressure. Those might include a bad ...


10

I have only seen wear like that in tires that are around 10 years old. What does the date code say? Have you ever let a rubber-band sit for years? You are risking tread separation by driving them like this. If you can afford the tires you should replace them. An accident at high speed will cost you more than the tires.


10

In the UK, it would be illegal to drive on this tyre. Therefore, if you were stopped by the police, they would have the right to stop you driving further, order a tow-truck to collect your car and remove it. They could then fine you and charge you for the costs of towing and returning your car. I don't know about other countries.



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