Hot answers tagged

43

Nope, not normal You do not leave a foreign object in a tire under any circumstances. The object can dislodge itself during higher speeds and lead to deflation creating a very high risk event. If they plugged the tire there will be a rubber plug with vulcanizing glue but not a nail or other related object. Validate that it's not a rubber plug, if it's ...


35

This tire was driven on long after the blowout When there is sidewall separation from tread carcass like this it had to have been driven on longer than claimed. When a tire suffers pressure loss and the car compresses what's left of the tire there's a fold along the sidewall that, if driven on, heats up due to the bending and associated friction. Once the ...


33

Or is it fine to even go a little bit on the highway for a few days before I replace it? No. Please don't drive on that tire. You are seeing a large scale deformation in a portion of the tire that's not designed for point stresses like that. There's pretty clearly a thin layer of rubber standing between the marginally acceptable and explosively ...


30

The only advice anyone could possibly give about this tire is that it should not be taken on the road. Out of respect for other peoples lives, the car should not be driven with even one tire like that on it.


29

Yes, but personally, I wouldn't risk it. The only time I've ever needed my spare was [cue spooky music] on a dark, stormy night, on a two lane highway through a dense forest. I was doing ~50 mph when I hit a pothole with front passenger tire. The tire didn't go flat immediately, but I could tell something was wrong, and was able to limp another 1/4ish mile ...


25

Your wheel is obviously leaking somewhere. There are a few places that you can have a leak related to the wheel The Schrader Valve - The schrader valve within the valve stem where you refill the air can be bad and require replacement. The valve stem - The valve stem where the schrader valve is in can have a bad a seal on the rim Tire Pressure Sensor - I ...


23

While I believe the tire shop gives free rotation to get you in the habit of coming back to them every few months so they can sell you more, it can be important to rotate your tires. It all depends on the wear of the tires I have had sets of tires that wore extremely evenly and I only rotated them once. Other sets of tires I have had wore very unevenly ...


21

Personally I wouldn't drive on that tire - if it delaminates while you're driving you're risking a blowout. You get bulges like that if the rubber basically separates from the various reinforcement plys in the tire and as the air in the tire heats up from driving, it'll slowly expand. All it takes then is something that pokes/cuts the bulge to turn your car ...


21

The tyre code is as follows: An optional letter indicating the intended vehicle class. Your tyre doesn't have one (or you omitted it) but it should be a P for passenger car. Possible values are: P for Passenger Car LT for Light Truck ST for Special Trailer T for Temporary Digits before the slash indicate the tyre width in millimetres. Your tyre has a ...


20

The tilt of the wheel is known as the camber angle. Tilting the wheel in that manner is called negative camber. Doing it the other way around (top outwards) is positive camber. Mounting the wheel with a negative camber improves grip under hard cornering as it counteracts rolling. On a completely level tire (0 camber), when a horizontal force is applied ...


19

Do you carry a toolset, lights, spare belts and hoses, and OBD-II decoder and electrical patch cables? If not, then you're not taking on much more risk by leaving the spare at home, provided you keep an eye on tire pressure, you drive on ordinary roads, and your tires are nowhere near their end of life. Spare tires are common because, for most of the ...


18

My wife had a similar problem on her car and it turned out the problem was the wheel, not the tire. We'd had enough sand and salt on the road this winter that she had corrosion / gunk building up right at the bead. The tire shop dismounted the tires, cleaned up the seating area on the wheel and then remounted the tire. The problem now seems to be solved.


18

Why doesn't your friend believe his wife? The tire probably blew up when it hit a pothole or curb. She drove without noticing until it started to pull to the side. Probably a little while until she found a safe place to park. What's so unbelievable about the above scenario? You and your friend should chill out and be happy that she is OK. Blow outs can kill ...


17

Remember that lug nuts are exposed to literally every element that could possibly cause corrosion. It sounds like your last nut is stuck due to some rust or oxidation that you can't see. Here's how I generally approach a badly stuck nut: Check your safety gear: eye protection, jack stands, everything to keep yourself from getting killed when this wheel ...


17

Issues involving steering wheel vibrations problems usually are most noticeable at one or two narrow speed ranges (5-10mph and 60-70mph), and will decrease significantly, and in some cases, even disappear outside of these ranges. The amount of vibration caused by worn tires will often be seen over a broader speed range if the tire is worn more. The severity ...


17

They need to be aligned Well, technically the wheels need to be aligned. This doesn't have much to do with fitting tires and is more of a mechanical maintenance item on the car. It's a good idea to have an alignment done when you buy new tires because poor alignment will make your tires wear out very fast. Since its a new car, if you drive on good roads ...


16

Yes, you should fill your tire. The fact the other tires all are nominally correct means you should trust your gauge. Modern tires often have reinforced sidewalls that mask the appearance of low pressure. Waiting for a bad wear pattern is not a good plan, as then you'll have an unevenly worn set of tires.


16

From the look of the rim, it seems it may have been in contact with something ... that something may have been a curb or two. If so, this could have weakened the side wall, which caused catastrophic failure. Given other factors, like if the tire was low on pressure and was continued to be driven on, then this to could have exacerbated the situation. Hot road/...


14

Nitrogen is inert and doesn't affect rubber or the steel rim. Carbon dioxide is highly reactive and affects both the rubber by causing swelling in the rubber. It also would cause corrosion in iron based rims (particularly Carbon- Steel). Edit: When CO2 is mixed with moisture becomes Carbolic acid which is corrosive. It all depends on concentration. It is ...


13

First, the critical caveat: You are the driver. You have to make the decision. It ultimately doesn't matter what we say. Given, that, I would say NO, it is not safe to drive until the weekend. Get the broken tire fixed or replaced as soon as possible. You have two problems: Top speed limitation: the donut is top-speed rated for 50 mph (check the ...


13

The damage you are showing is minor cosmetic damage. If the following occurs with sidewall damage, then get it replaced: Tire deflation (cannot be legally repaired in most countries) You pull the flap back and see damage to the side wall plies (corded area under the rubber which supports the tire) whether deflation has occurred or not Bulging of the tire ...


13

The below are very easy checks you can do while buying a used car.(from anywhere for that matter of fact) Engine This is the most complicated/expensive part to maintain/replace. Head Gasket check: Open the oil filler cap or the dip stick for any milky white substance , like mayoneese ,if it is present then stay away , it means the head gasket is ...


13

Physics says: T2 p2 = (p1+p0) * ---- - p0 T1 If you have temperature T1 and pressure p1 when you filled the tires, you can calculate the new pressure p2 when the temperature changes to T2. Since pressure is measured relative to ambient air pressure, you also need that pressure p0. Though there are changes in ambient air ...


13

One way to determine where the tire / wheel is leaking, is to make a solution of soapy water and put it in a spray bottle. Take the wheel off the car, and coat the tire and wheel on every surface with the soapy water. The place where the bubbles are active is your leak. I have no doubt that one of the places @DucatiKiller mentioned will be the problem. Hope ...


13

In almost all circumstances you should use the manufacturer's numbers as your guide. They are aware of the requirements of their wheels, and they do understand that a low profile requires a certain pressure to resist damage. This doesn't necessarily need to be a higher pressure (although it sometimes is) because the wheel construction also needs to be ...


12

The reality is that snow tires live in a world of wet snow and salt. That's about the worst possible combination for corrosion. Your best bet in that situation is to dilute the salt-water solution, usually from straight water rinsing. Any remaining risk of corrosion will have been greatly decreased by your rinse. My inclination is to rinse off the tires ...


12

Winter tires in Winter and Summer tires in Summer. With very rare exception the "All-Season" tires are really only very good for 3-Seasons, or for places where the roads are always kept clear in the Winter. Do all 4. Having a mix of Winter/Summer tires will adversely affect handling and braking.


12

You can calculate the size of the effect from simple geometry. Tire wear reduces the diameter of the tire, which reduces the circumference of the tire. New passenger car tires typically come with 10/32" to 11/32" of tread depth (source). Tires are considered fully worn-out when only 2/32" of tread remains. So the tire has lost 8/32"--9/32" on the radius, or ...


12

tl;dr: No. This sort of vehicle dynamics question best addressed by Racing Car Vehicle Dynamics What follows is a basic discussion at the high school physics level. As you will see from the reference text, high school physics is insufficient to statically model the complete vehicle system. A dynamic model is required to agree with easily obtainable ...


12

Officially, the better tires go on the rear to help prevent oversteer. If you front tires loose traction (understeer), you are going to go straight until you catch traction, or hit something. Its safest to hit something with the front of your car. If you oversteer, it is much more difficult to recover. You are more likely to hit things with the side or ...



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