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Yes, it is by design ... because it helps to equalize wear across the sprocket teeth and chain links. Here's why I had originally shared a link in the comments which presents the formula to calculate what's known as hunting tooth frequency. Mesh rate aside, this is governed by the the number of teeth in the sprocket and chain, a and b respectively: ...


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You need to determine if the engine is interference or not. If it is, rotating the cam(s) and crank independent of each other will destroy the engine. Not interference - rotate away until everything lines up. Interference - remove the cam(s), align the crank, reinstall cam(s) at proper alignment. Since the belt is already off, removing the cam(s) should ...


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All the important pulleys (the crank, the camshaft(s) and anything else that is vital) will have alignment marks that you can use to align them - usually an indent on the pulley and a matching mark on the end of the block/head. Key things to remember: The parts are all designed to rotate together, so ideally you need to turn them all at the same time. As ...


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A few thoughts (in no particular order): It sounds like one or more cylinders are not firing You'll want to isolate the problematic cylinder(s). Assuming the car has run for a bit since the timing belt swap, you could try to inspect the spark plugs to see if any of them is wet or looks different from the rest. This should give you focus in on the problem ...


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Before you go thinking the belt is out of time, when your mechanic told you about the wires, what he may have been suggesting is that you have the wires on the wrong plugs. This will create the imbalance you are talking about, yet most of the time will not show a trouble code (because they are all still firing, just not at the right time). Double check to ...



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