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9

While regular maintenance is not required it is advisable to check how much the chain has stretch, say every few 100K. If the chain stretches too much the tensioner may no longer be able to perform its job. There's also the problem of the pins becoming a bit loose in the side plates. The chain should also get a visual check whenever the opportunity presents ...


8

Even if the timing belt is "probably" okay, you have to weight the costs and benefits of not replacing it. From what I can tell, this car has an interference engine, meaning if the timing belt breaks, the cylinders will smash into the valves. As long as they don't break off and also tear up the cylinders/combustion chamber, this is a difficult but doable job ...


7

There really isn't an indicator for belts, unfortunately. If the boyfriend of the previous owner says the dealer changed it, bring the car to that dealer, if possible, and have them look up a service record. If you're far away from the dealer, call in and have your VIN handy. I'd say this is your best bet.


7

You don't weigh them against each other. Items are generally inspect or replace at x miles or y period of time, whichever comes first. This is what you need to do to keep the car within factory tolerances. Go outside of that range and you become a "test driver", which may not be an issue, but it could be for certain parts...


7

tl;dr: a broken timing belt always means some sort of damage. Like Brian says, interference engines are obviously at risk of the most straightforward damage: pistons hitting valves with great energy, causing ma$$ive destruction. Here is a cautionary video illustrating some of the parts that can be immediately broken, causing a appalling domino effect of ...


6

Check with the manufacturer to see if it's an interference engine or not. Even so, that's not an absolute guarantee. Occasionally someone with an interference engine will get lucky and not have the valves and pistons attempt to occupy the same space at the same time. I've also heard anecdotal reports of non-interference engines suffering damage when ...


6

As they are made of rubber, belts begin to perish over time, and this weakens them. The constant flexing as the engine turns accelerates this weakening process. Eventually (if it weren't replaced), the rubber would split and the belt would snap - causing very expensive damage to your engine... It is quite easy to visually observe a belt that definitely ...


6

Belts are quieter but are often less obviously worn before they break (chains stretch and loosen, belts tend to stay tight without damaged belt teeth up until the moment they snap). Timing belts are also less complicated (chains require an oil bath). Chains are generally stronger, so vehicles with timing chains often drive more than just the cam with the ...


6

You have the D16A6 engine. From searching various forums it seems that is an interference design. However, while valve damage is possible (probable?), it may not be certain. There do seem to be reports of timing belt breaks without valve damage. Then again, there are reports of bent valves, too (though that is a later 1.7L version of your engine). A break at ...


5

That is usually caused by a tired ancilliary belt (the one that drives the alternator etc) - as the rubber ages, it grips less well and slips more against the pulleys, especially when cold and damp. After a couple of minutes it dries out and warms up, and so stops slipping. The timing belt itself is toothed, and so cannot slip (it would cause a catastrophic ...


4

If the engine is a non-interference design, you're fine. If it's an interference design, you've probably got engine damage from the valves being open at the wrong time and being struck by the pistons. To find out which type you have, you need to figure out which engine you have. Search for 'gm VIN decoder' and enter your VIN. Once you know the specific ...


3

I don't know that car specifically, but in general, Holdens have their timing belt (and waterpump) replaced every 75000km to 120000km. But open your car's service booklet. It should tell you the service schedules and what you need to do at each interval. Usually all of them will suggest at least inspecting belts for wear. Keep in mind that a broken timing ...


3

For what it's worth, the timing belt slipped (rather than breaking) on my 92 Civic due to a mistake on my part when I was repairing it, and the engine suffered no noticable damage. Before accepting that the engine is ruined, I would spend the money (or do it yourself) to have someone put a new belt on it and realign the timing. Here is my old question and ...


3

If the wrong tension is on the belt one of two things could happen Too loose: Skip a tooth or two on the belt - this leads to early/late firing and possibly pistons slapping on to valves if the clearances are already tight. Too tight: extra tension put on the belt - this can lead to bearings being incorrectly loaded and at worst a failure in the belt - ...


3

There is some sort of a lock-tight compound inside that thread. I have already removed that screw in my V6 Accord twice. (Practically the same engine) The first time was a pain. I have good socket spanners so instead of braking a socket I broke a, 1/2" in diameter, extension shaft. I used 5 feet long extension bars on both sides of a wrench - delivered ...


3

Most modern car engines are "interference" engines, meaning the pistons and valves will collide if not kept in synchronization by the timing belt. I don't know whether your Camry has an interference engine; maybe someone who knows Toyotas can provide a better answer. If closer inspection by the dealer or another mechanic indicates that the belt or its ...


3

Regular maintenance is not needed. However, a "rattling" noise that changes with engine RPM may indicate a problem with the chain or timing gears. Usually this isn't an issue until higher mileage (150k +). Next time you go by your dealership, ask them if they've had any problems in particular with your year model. If you hear of instances of chains commonly ...


2

The manual states that for a 2003-2007 honda accord, the timing belt should be replaced at an 8 year or 105,000 mile mark. I just inherited a 2004 Honda Accord EX-V6 sedan from my father who purchased this car new in 2004. He drove a total of 55,000 miles in the 8 years in which he owned the vehicle. I feel stuck because I don't want the belt to snap off, ...


2

What are your driving conditions? If you primarily do city driving (stop and go, dusty) or live in a particularly hot or cold environment, then it's worth looking at the "severe service" area of your manual, and go by that recommendation. Usually, it's relatively easy to inspect the timing belt by taking off the top part of the timing belt cover. You are ...


2

The crankshaft bolt on that engine is just a standard right hand thread bolt. The correct way to get the bolt off is to get as big of an impact as necessary to make it happen. If a 1/2" impact does not cut it then get a 3/4". If you are breaking sockets then you are using the wrong sockets. Make sure to use an impact socket. I have found that ...


2

BMW timing chains are engineered for the life of the engine and never need maintenance or replaced. To prove that point BMW has always performed several long distance tests on its new engines before they are put on the market. Back in the 90s they took a e34 (5 series) and ran it over 2 million miles, just performing the standard maintenance. When they ...


2

I may not be 100% accurate but I think belts have expected lift time of 60k-100k and at 100k they should definitely be changed. Chains are claimed by a lot of manufacturers to have lifetime duration and shouldn't need to be replaced. They have been known to break but as Brian mentioned, that's very rare. I've also heard of a more common failure mode with ...


1

It sounds like a belt to me. Check the tension on the belt you replaced and see if the pulley needs an adjustment. I imagine there's a slight variation in how well the rubber "sticks" to the pulleys when it's cold vs when it's hot, so it slips more when it's cold. Check all the other belts too. You could also start the car and go listen around the engine and ...


1

I would go with whichever you trust more. Find out whether other people are happy with the work the local mechanic has done - is he registered with one of the review firms ("CheckATrade" or similar)? I would expect that the Dealer would be more familiar with the car, but the local mechanic would take more care - hence why he's quoting more, as it'll take ...


1

Tried a lot of things, some of which helped incrementally but didn't fully fix the problem: Torquing the exhaust manifold nuts to spec. Replacing the muffler. Finally took it to a shop for diagnosis and they found that the timing was off and fixed it for barely more than the diagnostic work. Now it seems to be running great. I think it must have just ...


1

I used the breaker bar and ignition method. I disabled the engine by pulling the fuel injector fuse. Car cranks but doesn't start. I put the breaker bar and 19mm impact socket in place, made contact with the frame and the breaker bar, and duct taped everything in place. One second on the ignition key and the bolt is loose. To tighten, get the 50mm ...


1

I see that the online Owner's Manual for your vehicle does not specify the mileage and rather defers to the Maintenance Minder feature of your vehicle. This is unfortunate, I can check the service manual later and see if it species whether the maintenance minder is hard coded or if it would produce variable recommendations like some other vehicles are ...


1

A: The service manual shows that the belt is to be replaced at 60,000 miles or 100,000 km. On both the 2.4 and 2.7 liter motors. So you still got some miles to put on your car. Happy motoring Source: http://kiacarsfaq.com/Kia+Optima/2004+Kia+Optima.html make sure you replace the timing belt every 50K-60K miles, as they have an 'interference' ...


1

long chains will get loose sooner, hard shifting will knock it around and shorten its life, infrequent oil changes will interfere with lubrication as the carbon biulds up on the chain. most engines either have a auto tensioner, or a good guide to help it from slaping ,belts are good but some are very hard to change, to bad the manufactuers dont try to make ...



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