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1

Going by the results of tests carried out by consumer organizations: no-name/unknown-brand tires often don't perform as well as the well-known brands. Worse: performance tended to be uneven. Cheap tires that worked well in the dry would have 2x the stopping distance of all the others in the wet, for example. There are outliers, both positive and negative of ...


3

In Europe, only tires with an EU Tire Label are allowed to be sold. Big brands were initially happy for the introduction of this label, but were disappointed about the results. Those "crap" Chinese tires were performing almost equal with the big brand tires, but cost half as much. A lot people say "it's your safety don't do it". The companies would be very ...


3

Hand Priming Shocks of Various Dampeners/Struts is Urban Legend This myth has been perpetuated over time and has gained legs and therefore credibility. Yes, it's true that the gas and oil separate on the shelf lying horizontally. It's also true that they separate on the shelf if stored vertically, piston rod up or down. But it doesn't matter. These ...


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Fun fact: the average mid-sized car tire sees ~800 revolutions per mile, so every component of a 50k mile tire must endure more than 40 million loading/unloading cycles! (note: some tires are not guaranteed for 50k miles). Source + testing information can be found in the PDF titled 'The Pneumatic Tire' on this page. Regardless of mileage rating, all tires ...


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In the US, the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) is the governing body that controls testing and specifications of motor vehicles. They mandate that a certain set of standardized tests are carried out on all tires sold for highway use. Tires that are made for off-road equipment and possibly some trailers might not have to undergo the ...



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