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7

A simple test that you can perform in your own driveway is: For each corner of the car, push down hard several times (the car should be bouncing visibly up and down) When pushed down, release and watch The car should bounce upwards (above the normal resting point) and then immediately settle at the resting point. Additional bouncing indicates worn or ...


7

Water in fuel is easy to figure out. Put a sample (say 5 to 10 ounces) of the fuel into a clear glass container. Let it sit. If it separates into two layers, you have water in the fuel. Shown: an obviously contrived example of gasoline (10% ethanol) with approximately 2 ounces of water added - water has visibly sunk to the bottom of the jar.


4

Take a small propane tank, hook up a hose to it and open the valve slightly. Start following the vacuum lines until you hear the idle go up; that's where your vacuum leak is. The reason that works is that vacuum leaks are places where the vacuum system is open and drawing in air unmetered, causing the system to have a different fuel/air mixture than the ...


4

Yes it can. The reason is, these are two different tests, done differently, reading different things. To understand this, you need to understand how the tool works for each test. For the compression test, the test apparatus captures and holds the compression as it builds through several, but counted revolutions of the crankshaft. You will get so much ...


4

Compression test is more to test if there is a problem. If your compression is low, it could be a number of different issues. You can test the rings by adding oil to the cylinder and see if the compression is higher. Other than rings it can be difficult to determine the source of the issue. A leakdown test will tell you where the problem is. By watching ...


3

I do it until the gauge doesn't go up anymore. I am not aware of a specific number of times that it needs to be done. That usually takes 6 or 7 times, but I have never actually counted.


3

A cylinder leak-down tester is a completely different animal than a combustion leak detection kit and has a completely different job. While the combustion leak detector checks for carbon-dioxide (CO₂) in the radiator. The cylinder leak-down tester kit hooks up to to your cylinder through the spark plug hole on one end and to your compressor on the other. You ...


1

It sounds like the mechanic is citing the maintenance schedule rather than a particular symptom. 74K miles is a good long way for a set of shocks and, while it's great that you aren't currently worried about their state, the vehicle will begin to suffer as they eventually fail. Here's a previous question that describes some of the rebounding that will ...


1

Smoke, propane, stethoscope, and carb cleaner all work well. The last option is highly flammable and much more dangerous than propane because it sits and accumulates on the engine. It doesn't evaporate all that quickly, either. It's a very effective way to check a particular spot, to see if your hunch is right, but it's essential that you have a good fire ...


1

Smoke and propane both work well. Another option is a rubber hose stethoscope. This isolates the noise to the end of the hose, and will make a vacuum leak hiss fairly loudly. If you have a stethoscope with the metal rod that you use for putting on the engine block, just yank the rod part out of the hose and viola! You have a new tool. You may be able to ...



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