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5

The parking lamp/headlight switch applies power or ground so the circuit would be open if you were testing with the switch off. Same with the turn signals. The tail lights are on separate circuits. They don't share a ground. Does the car have an aftermarket trailer harness? If not your going to have to remove panels and visually inspect the harness for ...


4

Remove the tail light bulb then hit the brake and see if it still blows the fuse. If the brake light works, then the combined bulbs is too much for the fuse. Check the wattages of the new bulbs. If it still blows remove both bulbs. If it still blows you could have a short in the housing. Re-install the old one to make sure you didn't introduce a short in ...


4

Its a mixture is tradition and function. Red has been used to signify "Stop" much longer and in many more applications than just motor vehicles. Stop and Do-Not-Enter signs are used everywhere. Possibly, although I can not confirm or cite a source, in history blood was used to mark doors and entryways that should not be entered and therefor the red color ...


3

I'm going to answer this in a general way because for someone to tell you what the wires mean, they would need to follow this procedure, or have access to detailed wiring diagrams for your car. You'll need a multimeter for this, and you'll have to take apart the brake light as if you were changing the bulbs so you have access to the bulb sockets. I'm ...


2

I'm assuming that you are testing the brake bulb voltage with the brakes actuated. There is high resistance somewhere in the circuit causing a voltage drop. For example lets suppose there is 10k ohm of resistance in the brake light switch. When the bulb is out and the switch is activated there is no current flow. A good meter has 20M ohm of resistance and ...


2

The first place to look for the headlights would be the fuse panel(s). Often there are two: one inside the passenger compartment, either at the driver or passenger kick panel or on the side of the dash where the door covers the dash on the driver side. The other is the engine compartment (in a black plastic box--diagram will be on the inside cover or on the ...


2

I had the same problem, turned out to be the green / white wire on the right rear cluster. Simple easy fix.


2

Blue Green is the indicator wire for the left rear, blue brown for the right rear. Assuming USDM.


2

If you are looking to figure out which wire goes to which, an easy way to figure this out is to have a source which produces 12vdc and has the two leads for (+) and (-) with probes attached, plus a pad and pencil to mark down what is what. After you have your 12v source and other supplies to get started, take the bulb section out of the housing so it looks ...


1

I usually use a knife or an ice pick to get between the body of the plug and the head of the center pin/screw. You should be able to pry the screw part out. It is sometimes necessary to cut the entire head off with a knife or wire cutters. You can find replacement plugs either in the HELP! section at most auto parts stores or online at a Honda parts site, ...


1

The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) does not define regulation, it reflects it. In the United States the Code of Federal Regulations defines the rules for general safety in automobiles. In this case case, the DOT (Department of Transportation) has defined this framework and has published it in the CFR's. Here is a link for the CFR (Code of Federal ...


1

In a nutshell, because regulations demand it. For tail lamps: ECE R7 (which covers all of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Africa) demands two red tail lamps. Regulations defined in SAE J585e apply in the USA. For turn signals: ECE R6 demands two yellow lamps for front, rear and side indicators SAE J588 permits red or yellow for the rear ...


1

I did finally figure this out. The newer Focus uses CANBus to detect bulb and circuit faults, so the brake light circuit ALWAYS has 12v going through it, with a clamped amperage to prevent the bulb from illuminating. When you press the brake pedal, the "clamp" goes away, allowing the bulb to glow. The other factor, is the car's BCM detects load on the ...


1

Left brake light was not working. The brake light would come on when turning on headlights so I knew the bulb was good. Bam! Contact with the housing was the problem. Manually pulled the small contact tabs out to make better connection. Also swapped the right light for the left and they both worked.


1

For me, it was the brake light housing on both sides. MY OPINION...this is a crappy design! The 3 little points, once you twist on the housing, barely makes proper contact. I had to rig up something to make better contacts.


1

As an alternative, you could make a mounting bracket for a push-to-make switch somewhere on the gearshift surround at the base of the gear lever in the cabin and wire the reverse lights to that. That way it would engage when the shift lever was pushed into the reverse position and wouldn't be a manual switch.



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