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7

Your AC drain may be stopped up. Your AC evaporator condenses water when the warm moist air passes over it, this happens in the normal operation of the AC. There is a drain that is suppose to drain the water outside the car, when it gets stopped up water collects in the evaporator case under the dash, it will eventually drain somewhere, most likely on your ...


5

If the voltage was 10.5V that means the battery was completely empty, 0%. You should never let your battery go that low, several such discharges damage it irreversibly. I assume it is a lead-acid battery? Best never let it go below 12V (I mean voltage measured after the battery has been at rest - not powering anything, nor charged - for a few hours). If you ...


5

It is unlikely that simply removing and re installing the wheel would cause air to enter the brake system, though I suppose if someone had repeatedly squeezed the brake lever while the wheel was off the bike, that could have run the master cylinder reservoir dry and admitted air. One should never apply the brakes unless brake pads and brake rotor are all ...


5

Take the hard rubber pieces out of the sprocket assembly and put them in the hub. Note that they can only be installed one way. It does not matter if you install them in different locations in the hub. There should be something in your manual about greasing the parts that run around the axle, usually with NLGI 2. Then install the sprocket assembly and ...


4

Start from the beginning. Check your battery. Then check your fried cables. Try to fix as much as possible. Make sure nothing is short-circuited. If all looks good, pull out the electric wiring diagram and identify all the items which prevents it from starting. Measure all these points and make sure there is no short/open circuits. The obvious would be: ...


4

A carburetor is a carburetor: it doesn't matter what kind it is - it allows air to flow through it and meters the fuel to produce the optimal air/fuel ratio to allow the engine to run. That said, you'll have two things to look at: First, fitment. Will a different carburetor physically fit within the confines of the current carb? Will the carb output size ...


4

You can, but you'll significantly reduce the life of your engine. That's the short and to the point answer. I don't know too much about bikes, but if this were a car, I'd at the very least have someone tweak the carbs and adjust the timing somewhat.


4

I'm not an expert on bike carbs, but if they are the same as car ones there will be two settings - one for mixture and one for idle. Once you have them balanced, you'll need to adjust these to get the right levels, while still keeping the pair balanced (i.e. increase the idle on both by the same amount, then check the balance, then decrease the mixture a ...


4

Assuming you connected the positive terminals and negative terminals together on the jump, there shouldn't have been any harm done to the bike's electrical system or battery. Take the battery to an auto parts store and have them test it. If the battery fails their test, replace the battery. Next, check the main fuse, usually on the same cable as the ...


4

For a start your starter motor is the cylindrical thing to the right of #9 in this picture I'd check it has a good connection to ground (is the resistance between the - negative terminal of battery to the outer steel of the starter lots less than 1?) Whip the seat off and check the starter relay and see if theres any corrosion and it's nice and tight. ...


3

My experience (in multiple cars, albeit not your make/model) has been that this sound always means your cooling system is under-filled. If you've emptied your cooling system and refilled it, it can be really hard to get all the air pockets out of the heater core, especially since in many vehicles it's almost as high as the radiator cap and at the opposite ...


3

Typically car stereos do require a constant voltage source in order to keep settings - they may have a supercap which keeps settings for a short while (for changing batteries over etc), but over time this may degrade, and in any case is only designed to last for a few minutes. In order to do this you usually have an unswitched power wire directly from the ...


3

Full float bowls don't necessarily mean a lot. Have you confirmed that you're getting gas to the plugs? Did you drain the float bowls before you laid the bike up for winter? You need three things to get the engine running - fuel, spark and compression. Assuming that the timing isn't way off (which would also lead to backfiring), you've got a spark. Which ...


3

if the shake becomes worse when you apply the brake, then I'd agree with the garage. The rotors are wearable items and as they get older, they often develop a warp (or to be more precise according to some schools of thoughts, uneven build up of brake pad material). How many miles are on those rotors? Also depends on your driving patterns, my rotors ...


3

The regulator or rectifier isn't going to be bother by a bit of water splashing on it. Quite simply, the voltage is too low for the water to pass a current. What is more likely is that water getting into/onto the high voltage part of the ignition circuit has caused a spike or surge to be sent through the low voltage circuit, which will fry rectifiers and ...


3

If the vehicle has been well maintained you just need a few small changes. The coolant that protected your engine from Florida heat will protect it from Washingtons' cold. If you will be driving in snow on a regular basis, you may want snow tires or all season tires, especially if this will be your first experience driving in snow. Make sure the windshield ...


3

This sounds like a clutch problem. If it is nearing end of life opening the throttle can break its friction, which is why the speed drops and revs increase. Get it along to the garage before it finally gives up the ghost.


3

As stated in the comments, it's a lot cheaper to remove excess weight. If you use this car as a daily drive it's best to keep stuff like a spare tire and jack in your car.. Start with the easy stuff: a lot of people have a lot of stuff in their car that they'll never need. If you want to make the car even more lighter, you could opt to remove the rear seat ...


3

I've had this on a few bikes and it can happen for a few reasons. If it it's only happened a couple of times i wouldn't be too worried. I've had a 'false neutral' when changing gears and instead of engaging the next gear the gears don't quite engage and you end up between them. Older bikes with higher mileage might be more prone to this. To avoid it I've ...


2

The first thing you should try is replacing the battery completely, contrary to what you're guessing. Whether or not you can turn on your headlights or turn on your radio has little bearing on the health of your battery and whether it can start the engine. The fact that you haven't ever replaced the battery since buying the car in 2008 and now the car is ...


2

Suzuki garage found the issue. Broken hose going to the engine was the problem, nothing major.


2

I can't recommend it. I was told that 100LL has about 4x the lead that the old regular leaded fuel had. Even on aircraft (which run at or near 75%+ power continuously) lead fouling of plugs is a major issue with frequent cleanings required.


2

I agree with @mac it shouldn't happen after a simple tire change. Have you tried bleeding the brakes? There could be some air in the fluid that is loosing "breaking power" when you apply the brakes. To do this there is usually a nipple on the caliper that you can loosen off slightly then press the break leaver softly and slowly till some fluid comes out. ...


2

There are a few possibilities, especially with the smaller Suzuki shift drums such as yours as well as the innate way in which constant mesh transmissions work. The detente at the end of the pawl lifter on the cam driven gear that the shifting shaft acts upon could be getting stuck as it's old and worn out. The pin costs $2.95 and is worth replacing. as ...


2

Given the piston skirt is the bit of the piston under the gudgeon pin on the piston/conrod, it seems this is a way of reducing drag and wear on the cylinder (i.e. less contact patch) and therefore making it more efficient. A similar principle is used in slipper pistons A slipper piston is a piston for a petrol engine, that has been reduced in size and ...


2

It is common for a chain to be tighter in certain spots than others, owing to some slight eccentricity of the sprockets. The generally accepted practice is to adjust chain tension relative to the tightest spot you can find, so that you avoid creating overly-tight spots, which could drastically accelerate the wear of the chain potentially leading to ...


2

@marc covers the adjustment process well. However, uneven tension is a sign of wear, and can be a cause for chain replacement. Every chain driven bike has a maximum chain slack, and a minimum. Chain slack should be adjusted to the minimum allowable slack at the tightest point. After adjusting, the loosest point must also be checked. If the chain slack is ...


2

The rubber seals that are staying on the inner fork tube after riding are called dust seals. They are one of two seals that are used to seal the fork slider onto the inner fork tube. The first seal you see, the dust seal, does not prevent the oil from leaking out. When you look into the the area where the dust seal would go you will see your oil seal. ...


2

There is a sidestand switch that kills the motor if you attempt to put it into gear with the sidestand down, it's a safety measure. Check that switch at the top of your sidestand to see if the a mount bolt or nut has fallen out thereby loosening the switch and making the vehicle inoperable when you put it into gear.


1

You're referring to recalls 07V452000 and 12V397000, right? If the recall has not expired, a dealer should perform the fix without charging you. The only way to know for sure is to contact a Suzuki Dealer or Suzuki and ask. The Dealer should be able to look the VIN up and give you a definitive answer as to whether the fix was applied to your vehicle. ...



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