New answers tagged

1

Presumably the bulk of the equipment was in the boot / low down. If you'd strapped it to the roof you might not have found the same improvement in handing came about. What you had effectively done was lower the centre of gravity of the vehicle. This is the same reason that ground-up designed fire engine such as the Dennis Rapier sling their water tanks ...


1

The smoothness of the ride is determined by the ability of the suspension to respond to changes in the road surface without affecting the body of the car. The ratio of sprung to un-sprung weight will greatly affect this. By increasing sprung weight with more luggage, your car body will have greater inertia and therefore will allow the wheels to move up and ...


2

Assuming they were the base models, the two cars you mentioned (Acura TL and Mazda6) are both Front-Wheel Drive (FWD), while the Mercedes is Rear-Wheel Drive (RWD). The FWD cars, having both their engine and transaxle mounted over the front wheels, have a front-biased weight distribution, requiring stiffer front springs to control the weight. The higher ...


0

A tuned suspension would provide a smoother ride. That would be built into the design of the car at an early stage. "Cheaper" cars would have the extra "engineering time" to do this. It's not an expensive component, it's a more thought-out part of the design.


-1

Whenever I lowered the rear end of a car is when I got body roll. So I would say stock springs is the best way, but if you want to lower your car then you should get strut and tower bars for the rear. I don't know if a new sway bar would help.


0

You probably have a limited range of tire size options (perhaps only one size) you can fit on the existing rims - you'd have to check with a tire dealer. There are cases where different makes/models of tires of exactly the same size will deliver different ride and handling qualities. Again, you'd have to check with a dealer. Just bear in mind that a more ...


5

Devin- Jeeps are off-road vehicles are NOT meant to have a soft ride. With that being said, no matter what tire you throw on it the ride quality will not change in this way. When I bought my Wrangler, I had the same tires you are referring to- Goodyear Wranglers. After about a year I swapped my tires to 265/75 r16 BFG All Terrain TA KO2 (original rim). I ...


3

I would not think more sidewall would help. The 75 denotes that you have a large amount of sidewall as it is. I would think the best place to look for a softer ride is the springs and shocks. The tire you pick will not effect how straight the vehicle drives. If it is pulling, you need an alignment. Personally, I would look on a website like tirerack....


1

It is unlikely you tightened them to the point of causing some damage. The paperwork that comes with the parts should have a reference to torque specs. An on line reference I found gives a value of 37ftlbs. As far as grease I use the chassis grease from the auto parts store. I generally give them a shot of grease prior to installation. I do this mostly to ...


0

So it sounds like VW uses three different kinds of "always replace" bolts: Torque-to-yield (TTY or T2Y) bolts which must be replaced because they are engineered for one-time use. Reuse of these is risking failure, Bolts treated for corrosion resistance (often with a green color), these are being replaced to ensure that the corrosion resistance is not ...


3

The actual reason to replace the bolts isn't specifically the bolts, it's the nuts. These are self locking (i.e. Nyloc) style nuts and after they've been removed and refitted, you can't be sure that they'll self-lock effectively. When purchasing a new balljoint, replacements for these are almost always provided. Your local dealership should charge you no ...


4

The other question I'd love an answer to is why are the bolts "always replace." Does the torquing process (20 Nm + 90º) weaken the bolt, or is it not reproducible? Or something else altogether? For a conventional bolt, ignoring the torque required to overcome friction when you tighten it, there is a linear relation between the amount of torque and the ...


7

I cannot tell you directly if the bolts you are using are Torque to Yield (TTY or T2Y) bolts, but if Bently says to replace them, you bet I'd do it. What are three bolts in comparison to the well being of your family and yourself, not to mention those around you should any of these bolts fail? As for T2Y bolts, here is what Fel-Pro says about them: T-T-...



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