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1

It depends vehicle specs, road conditions and driving habits. Shock absorbers are not carry the weight of the car, they are basically dampers. They restrict the amount of movement. In case of bump they compress and allow certain amount of resistance to slow down the movement. In rebound, basically the same function. So, without them, related wheel tend to ...


3

The key assumption in the OP's question was that replacement in pairs was because if one failed then the other must be close. It's actually about making them the same. Unless the car has a tiny number of miles on it, the two struts will always be in different parts of their lives. That means the original one will always be more worn than the replacement ...


4

Brakes and suspension should always be done in pairs. If you REALLY don't care about the car, you could just replace the one, but it could lead to alignment/tire wear/vehicle stability issues down the road.


5

The bar will fit best with the suspension in it's normal rest position, i.e. if the car is sitting on it's wheels. As DucatiKiller says in his comment, the best method is to jack up the hubs (making sure to put the jacks under a solid casting, so they can't cause any damage to the brakes!) to simulate the normal position.


3

What you're describing is called a ride height sensor. Delphi is one manufacturer that makes sensors for a wide variety of production vehicles from Corvettes to Cadillacs. For motorsports applications, there are also optical sensors. One popular one (at least in pro racing) is KA Sensors RHL3. It bounces a laser beam off the ground and determines ...


4

Any time something in the suspension is replaced or something adjustable is undone an a alignment is recommended. While theoretically there are lots of little tricks to get the alignment close, it will never be perfect without verification with an alignment check. The biggest problem is that the replacement part is never exactly the same as the original ...


2

By changing the flow of electricity through the magnetic fluid in the dampers, the viscosity of the fluid is changed. As the viscosity is changed, it becomes harder or easier for the suspension to be compressed, thereby allowing the suspension characteristics to be changed. Because this is controlled with an electric current, it can be changed hundreds of ...



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