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14

I would say this would be fine to drive slowly and carefully over short distances (I've had worse) - but things to be careful of: potholes speed bumps (seriously - watch out) cornering hard high speeds Also try and avoid braking or accelerating hard - gently come to a stop at lights etc as you want to avoid too much nose travel up and down. Get it to ...


10

Looks like a Stabilizer Bar Link for your steering stabilizer.


10

The vehicle in question is a front-wheel drive. FWDs are sensitive to front wheel alignment, since the front suspension and wheel linkages work under different conditions when accelerating and not accelerating: on acceleration, the wheels push backwards on the road, thus tend to move the front suspension forwards relative to the vehicle. on ...


9

What is a shock absorber? I'm going to answer the basic title question with a carefully selected quote from the great Wikipedia: ... their intended sole purpose is to dampen spring oscillations. Think of how you want your car to ride when driving down a smooth road that has a bump or pothole. You expect to feel a mild jolt when the car travels ...


7

It is always recommended to replace suspecsion and braking components on both sides of the same axle at the same time, wherever possible. Both will currently be the same age - if one has failed, it is likely that the other is in a similar condition and so could easily fail soon. In the case of springs, the constant flexing of the metal can eventually lead ...


7

Driving at a right angle will make the front and then the rear move further up and down than travelling over one wheel at a time, but that movement will be in one plane. Driving diagonally puts more stress on the chassis as it tries to twist first one corner then then next. The car will not move up and down so much, but will move sideways a lot more. So of ...


7

What you are describing is called bump steer. This is caused by a toe change when the suspension travels vertically. Common Causes include Incorrect tie rod height or lenght steering rack that is not mounted parallel to the datum plane. bent steering parts structural damage to the vehicle I'd start by checking the mounting of the steering rack since ...


6

Usually the bolts that strut braces attach to are the ones that attach the strut assembly to the car. The spring is held in place in the strut assembly by the nut in the middle, which I have never needed to remove to install any strut braces. See how the brace below has a hole in the middle for the top shock nut: This shock nut holds the upper spring ...


6

The weight of the car will be sufficient to keep the spring from decompressing fully and pulling out the bottom of the strut frame in the car. You must be careful not to jack the car up without the bolts secured tightly though, this could produce a dangerous situation. Also if you are ever working on the 'southern' half of the spring, where it interacts ...


6

Normally strut failure makes it to where they are ineffective in dampening the movement of the vehicle on the springs. This wouldn't cause a "rough" ride but in fact the opposite making it very soft and wavy. Where you'd hit a bump and the car would bounce multiple times as it settles back down on the springs. The strut reduces that movement allowing the ...


6

The front suspension has a lot of travel (e.g: bumps are fairly comfortable, but the car is 'rebounding' for a long while after the bump.) I'm going to go ahead and call it: you've used up your shocks. A lot of people forget that a shock (aka strut aka damper depending on your particular flavor) is a consumable part. It exists to damp out the ...


6

The only thing I see of any real concern here would be the left rear toe - it's off enough to possibly cause some tire wear. However, since it can't be adjusted, your best bet is to just rotate the tires regularly (every other oil change is a good rule of thumb) and keep an eye out for wear. You didn't say which Nissan you're driving, but I'm assuming it's ...


6

A fairly common issue on cars with strut suspension are broken springs. As the strut wears it looses its ability to control spring dampening. This allows the spring to compress and expand faster and farther than designed. Over time the spring weakens and breaks. The break many times occurs at the very last turns of the spring and may go unnoticed. Look at ...


6

Un-sprung Weight With all vehicles, un-sprung weight is the holy grail of handling. Un-sprung weight reductions result in a wheel getting back to the surface area it's adhering to in less time. The result is frequently less over-steer in cars and in motorcycles, less low=sides due to interruptions in friction adhesion to the surface. Un-sprung weight or ...


5

You have a couple of simultaneous questions going on here: You have an older / non-new car. Should you have to replace the shocks? Shocks wear out over time and mileage. I'm going to be replacing the wife's shocks this weekend (assuming they arrive on schedule). The existing shocks have at least 50K miles on them so they're at the end of their expected ...


5

I don't know the specifics of that car, so I'm going to take a stab and assume we're talking about coil springs. Springs only squeak where they contact something else, which is why spraying them didn't help. If you can't see anything else in contact with the spring have a look at the top and bottom seats. Those seats sometimes wear. Not necessarily all the ...


5

It's unlikely that there was any sort of shrapnel damage to the vehicle from a blown tire. It's more likely that the shredding tire whacked the vehicle a few times as it rotated to a stop. I would expect to see cosmetic damage around the bumped and underbody: e.g., rubber streaks and dents. You might find bits of rubber jammed up underneath suspension ...


5

In a word, Yes. Maybe it didn't hurt it where you can tell this time, but remember, cars were meant to stay on the ground, not do Dukes of Hazzard stunt flying. Every time something like this happens, you are putting undue stress on your springs, tires, rims, and suspension. Every time this happens, there has been a little more life which has left the ...


5

As a 35 year veteran motorcycle rider and owner of 15 different bikes during that time, while I don't dispute the unsprung weight argument made by DucatiKiller, I can tell you that there is a much, much, much more practical reason for using a single sided swing arm: It dramatically simplifies chain maintenance. You see, with a double sided swing arm, you ...


5

I pulled the tires off and inspected the front end suspension and steering, and found that the sway bar linkage on the drivers side was detached.


4

One way to check the struts is to jounce the vehicle. Push down hard and release quickly on the bumpers and see how many times the vehicle bounces. It should be no more than 1.5 times, more than that and the struts are bad.


4

There's an excellent Subaru parts catalog online. I think this is the drawing you want. I'm not sure what you mean by "front" bolt, though -- isn't one directly above the other?


4

It could be various things: loose fixing on a strut worn damper washers broken or loose mount points damaged universal joint And various others. I would definitely recommend getting it checked out, as if it broke at speed and was a component that keeps the wheel in contact with the ground then steering could get...interesting, with the front left ...


4

In my experience, Polyurethane bushes last longer than standard rubber ones, as the plastic doesn't perish in the same way that rubber does. As you mention, there is a price to this, as they are generally harder than the equavalent OEM bushes, however many manufacturers offer a variety of stiffnesses, depending on the intended use - some of the softest ones ...


4

Yes a Spring Compressor Tool is required to change that strut. Here is a picture of the strut, based on this design you will have to use the spring compressor for replacement.


4

Replacing shocks on a 1994 vehicle sounds fairly reasonable (assuming that they were the original shocks). I tend to agree with the alignment shop that you needed to replace those before doing anything else. I replaced my wife's struts not too long ago and one was completely collapsed - on her car, that has a distinct effect on the camber of the wheel. In ...


4

Wakeeta is right: this is your stabilizer bar link (AKA sway bar link). This is apparently a common failure point. Here's a very similar picture. A quick shopping search indicates that a replacement part is on the order of $30 (sweat equity not included).


4

It's impossible to give a definitive answer here as to what was done with your truck. However, it is often stated that when larger wheels and tires are fitted to a truck, the brakes should be upgraded. This is due to the larger rotational inertia of the larger wheels and tires, which can make the vehicle significantly harder to stop. Therefore, if the ...


4

Ok for the benefit of the question I will answer this. After much mucking around for quite a bit it seemed both the rear and front shocks had to be replaced, when they did the first test they just replaced the front then put the old ones back in, then swapped out the rear. They decided to swap the front again while the new rear ones were in and the ride went ...


4

Fork Straightening Process The slider and internal oil valving are removed. The stanchion (inner fork tube) is placed on v-blocks A dial indicator is used to detect deflection as the stanchion is rotated Once deflection is understood a hydraulic press is used to bend the stanchion back to its original state. The process of measurement and bending with the ...



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