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7

The first thing to check is the shifter linkage. If it uses a cable the cable my be frayed on the inside of the casing causing the friction. You may also have some other part of the linkage binding up, but my money is on the cable itself. It doesn't seem likely that it would be an internal transmission problem.


5

Pending code? The user manual for your device says it should say "PD" for pending codes, so maybe not. "P0130 P" isn't a valid DTC for your vehicle so pending code is really all that makes sense. More specific to your model P0130 is front oxygen sensor circuit range/performance problem (Lean) Possible causes: Open wire to O2 Sensor Short to ground in O2 ...


5

All wheel drive vehicles connect the front and rear axles via a transfer case or differential. While on a wheel lift tow one set is lifted off the ground and not spinning and the trailing wheels are spinning at road speed. This places a big load and resulting wear on the power transfer unit. Coasting allows all four wheel to spin at road speed but with no ...


4

A common problem with the 2.5L engines in the 2.5RS are head gaskets starting to leak around 100,000 miles. This is why Subaru normally warranties the head gaskets until 100,000 miles. It isn't an urgent issue and will not cause any catastrophic failure, but It will leak oil. Unlike other cars that urge you to stop driving immediately when the head gasket ...


4

There are 3 areas to focus on: Battery: Make sure your battery can still hold a charge well as cold is going to show problems first. Double check that your battery cables are tight and not overly corroded. Starter: As Bob asked, if the starter is the original it could be going bad and struggling under only tough conditions Electrical/Ignition Switch: ...


4

Either the owner's manual or a repair manual will give you this information. I happen to have an owner's manual for a '98 Forester, and the value given there is 6.2ℓ, or 6.6 U.S. quarts. The factory service manual for a 2000 Forester gives 6.0ℓ, or 6.3 U.S. quarts. It's possible that the owner's manual value includes the coolant in the reservoir (that's the ...


4

Does anyone have a definitive answer as to which option I should choose? I do: you need matching tires. That said, it's your car and you have to make the decision. I'd tend to replace all four. @Paulster2 also makes a good point that you could shave down a new one to match. Let's start by looking at one of the most useful paragraphs from the ...


3

No, you've got everything you'll need. A head gasket replacement isn't a job that requires lots of specialist equipment. It's mainly a set of wrenches (including a torque wrench) and something to scrape the old gasket off. But it's a long and tedious job. And I can't stress that last bit enough, especially if it's the first time you do it. If you want to ...


3

Sadly, I have a lot of experience with this exactly situation. We're not quite as deep into the Salt Belt as PA but still.... Will be removing at least some heat shielding ... For this part of the task, the most important tool that you need is replacement bolts. Those little heat shield bolts are the absolute worst: they're cheap metal holding other ...


3

I figure I'll post my own answer to the question today since it's the end of my 60 day window to request a refund. After all the things I tried, considering the Blue Devil attempt a failure, and starting the process to request a refund, I finally had success; the seal has held for over a month now. What it took in the end was driving 4 hours at 70 mph on a ...


3

They make a head gasket leak detector kit to determine if it's leaking. I would be surprised if you mechanic didn't have one. If he or she doesn't they are not that expensive. Here is an example below See my answer here for more info.


3

Subaru recommends every 48000 km or 30 months. It also recommends that it be changed more often if used in severe conditions. Severe duty would be lots of stop and go use like a taxi would see. Or very dusty conditions, wet conditions, towing heavy loads etc. The reason for the flush and change is because brake fluid absorbs water and water promotes rust. ...


2

The Ford will definitely be cheaper to run. Partly because, as you say, it is a more common car, and so parts are more readily available, but also because the Subaru has the flat-four 'boxer' engine, which is commonly known for being a pig to work on, as almost everything is inaccessible with the engine in the car... The Subaru will also cost more in fuel ...


2

The test connectors are common on Subaru vehicles. They put the car is diagnostic mode and allow for things like the ECU to be reprogrammed. I actually have a Saabaru and had to connect these to use a Cobb Accessport. While it was connected I also had fans and other items turning on and off randomly. Would need some context for the instructions in ...


2

Burning oil can cause fouled spark plugs, which can eventually lead to misfires. Burning oil could also potentially lead to valve issues if enough oil builds up. I'd imagine exhaust valves would be most susceptible. Your owner's manual may list an "acceptable" level of oil consumption, which could help you gauge how bad your condition is relative to what ...


1

Several items to look into: Even though your refrigerant has been refilled recently there is a chance that you have a leak and your compressor is cutting on/off. Double check that you still have adequate pressure. If the air is only cold when you are moving then that might point to your radiator fans not running and pulling air across your condenser. ...


1

A good fitting single-hex socket is a must. Heating the bolt to red hot in most cases will loosen a rusted exhaust bolt, a sharp rap or two with a hammer will help in some others. If all else fails and the bolts break off in the hole, you are more than likely bound to be taking off the part with the broken bolt in it and drilling and tapping the bolt out. An ...


1

Aftermarket part application databases are not always correct. Some vehicles had production changes during a model year. I've worked on such a vehicle, the bulb books at the parts stores were incorrect. Well, they were correct, but only for vehicles on the other side of the production change. The database the dealer parts departments use will have the ...


1

As to why, who knows what drives the manufacturers decisions. In this case, I would guess it is down to whatever the most convenient/cheapest bulb type is in each region. But yes, this is normal - my 06 Forester headlights are different again. My dipped beam bulbs are these: But my main beam are 10k HID units that can only be sourced from Japan!


1

If it were my money, I'd spend it on another Astra or even the 1.6 Turbo Corsa. But it's NOT my money, so I reckon the Ford is the better option economy-wise. I believe it will also provide greater sporty characteristics. I know that sounds counter-intuitive, but the Impreza 1.5R is actually a bit of a dog with all that extra weight thanks to the AWD system. ...


1

I have a 2007 Outback that had the same symptoms. Taking the MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor out and spraying some electronic sensor cleaner on it removed the hesitation. There are just two screws that hold it in to the intake, so it is a quick operation. Not sure if long term the MAF needs to be replaced but for now it is holding up.



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