Hot answers tagged

12

It sounds like your alternator has not been tightened enough and the serpentine belt is slipping because of it. Since you have new belts on your engine, this is probably about the only thing which it can be. If you press on the belt with your thumb at the center of the long portion of the belt (between pulleys), you should get no more than about 1/2" inch of ...


11

The short answer is "yes." The longer answer seems to hinge on the cost. The 30K mile service on my 2004 WRX included the following: Inspect Drive belt(s) [Except camshaft] Inspect Camshaft drive belt Replace Engine oil Replace Engine oil filter Perform Replace engine coolant and inspect cooling system, hoses and connections Recommended Performance ...


10

One of two things I think could be happening here. One of your wheels might have thrown a weight and become unbalanced. Second thing to check is to see if you have any ice buildup on the inside of the rim which would also have caused an imbalance. (Not knowing if you are in a winter climate where you are would figure into the second part of this answer.) ...


9

Does anyone have a definitive answer as to which option I should choose? I do: you need matching tires. That said, it's your car and you have to make the decision. I'd tend to replace all four. @Paulster2 also makes a good point that you could shave down a new one to match. Let's start by looking at one of the most useful paragraphs from the ...


9

As long as your timing belt was still attached you should be okay. When turning an engine in reverse, the only things it can damage are the oil pump and possibly the water pump. You'd have to do it QUITE a bit though, four revolutions shouldn't hurt it. The reason it CAN damage the engine is because you're forcing the internal mechanisms to run in the ...


8

Subaru engines very rarely blow up. As someone who has owned many and raced a few, and been a member of various Subaru owner forums, I know of some that had problems, but it was almost never the engine. Early Subarus had clutches that were a bit under-engineered, so typically they would be replaced at 75,000 miles, and you could kill brakes with a ...


8

The first thing to check is the shifter linkage. If it uses a cable the cable my be frayed on the inside of the casing causing the friction. You may also have some other part of the linkage binding up, but my money is on the cable itself. It doesn't seem likely that it would be an internal transmission problem.


7

It depends specifically on what's wrong with the starter. Sometimes you hear a clicking sound when you turn the key but the starter motor gears don't actually turn. This could actually be due to a weak battery, but if you know the battery has a full charge, then it could be the starter gears actually failing to turn. You may hear a whining sound, ...


7

The short answer is: none. A grade eight bolt that's broken off in the engine is almost certainly not going to extract in any conventional fashion. There's just too much torque on the threads. If you're going to drill a pilot hole big enough to get a grip on the remainder of the bolt, you're basically going to have to drill with a huge bit. Instead, the ...


7

Typically the fog is from excessive humidity in the vehicle. The three most common sources I can think of are: A leak that allows rain water to collect in the car. Check to see if the rugs are damp, look in the storage well behind the seat and any place water might collect. Do you also notice a sweet smell when the engine gets warm? If you do it may be a ...


7

Being that I'm mostly done with the job, here are some additional tools that have come in handy, beyond what I originally mentioned: Adjustable (or large, maybe 1-inch) wrenches to grab the hex on the cams and lock in place to break the cam sprocket bolts. 17mm open-end wrench (other people say screwdriver, but the wrench works much better!) to wedge in ...


7

In terms of towing, in reality, all you need is enough torque to get over initial resistance, as rolling resistance is much lower. This is why you get people who can tow a bus, or a jumbo jet, for example, so absolute power isn't the be-all and end-all. As I wrote in my comment, the flat-4 boxer engine is a good one for pulling, as it does give smooth ...


7

If you are in a high humidity area, I would: Coat the part in WD-40 (at least pieces which are made of or have exposed metal pieces). Put them into a large Zip Lock Style Vacuum Storage bag along with ~six oxygen absorbers Vacuum out the storage bag Place bag on the shelf and leave it alone. You may want to put something around the part so any sharp ...


7

From a technical service bulletin regarding the 2014 Subaru's: If you receive a customer concern of a “beep- beep-beep” sound when trying to operate the PRG, a likely cause is an incomplete initialization procedure. Repair Procedure: With the ignition “OFF”, open the PRG manually using a fluid motion (no light flash or beep should occur). ...


6

There's an excellent Subaru parts catalog online. I think this is the drawing you want. I'm not sure what you mean by "front" bolt, though -- isn't one directly above the other?


6

Most water pumps are designed with a weep hole.This is a small hole that leaks a small amount of antifreeze just before the water pump fails.Most of the time the leak is just above the crankshaft pulley.When you shut off the car the pressure in the cooling system forces some coolant out this hole and it drips onto the pulley and is transfered to the ...


6

To replace the clutch technically you only need a new clutch. However most people will purchase a Clutch Kit that will usually contain Clutch Pressure Plate Thrust/ Release Bearing Pilot/Spigot Bearing Alignment Tool The last 2 items are not always included in a clutch kit and they are not always necessary, although an alignment tool does make life a ...


6

Subaru engines have long been touted and praised for their reliability and longevity. The engines that seem to be blowing up all the time are almost certainly driven by enthusiasts trying to race as fast as they can up onramps and push their cars to the limit. ( Perhaps that's where the misconception is, if you're going to push your engine to the limit you ...


6

A common problem with the 2.5L engines in the 2.5RS are head gaskets starting to leak around 100,000 miles. This is why Subaru normally warranties the head gaskets until 100,000 miles. It isn't an urgent issue and will not cause any catastrophic failure, but It will leak oil. Unlike other cars that urge you to stop driving immediately when the head gasket ...


6

All wheel drive vehicles connect the front and rear axles via a transfer case or differential. While on a wheel lift tow one set is lifted off the ground and not spinning and the trailing wheels are spinning at road speed. This places a big load and resulting wear on the power transfer unit. Coasting allows all four wheel to spin at road speed but with no ...


6

Pending code? The user manual for your device says it should say "PD" for pending codes, so maybe not. "P0130 P" isn't a valid DTC for your vehicle so pending code is really all that makes sense. More specific to your model P0130 is front oxygen sensor circuit range/performance problem (Lean) Possible causes: Open wire to O2 Sensor Short to ground in O2 ...


6

No, you've got everything you'll need. A head gasket replacement isn't a job that requires lots of specialist equipment. It's mainly a set of wrenches (including a torque wrench) and something to scrape the old gasket off. But it's a long and tedious job. And I can't stress that last bit enough, especially if it's the first time you do it. If you want to ...


6

Paulster2 offers sound advice when he says the pads need to be replaced sooner rather than later. I recently took a picture when I performed a brake pad swap that offers a stark comparison of what you could be missing out on. The new pads for my BMW measured 10mm at the thickest part. The old pads were roughly 2mm, thin enough to cause my brake pad wear ...


6

Most likely the second latch just needs to be lubed. Of course, you need to get the hood open in order to do that! Depending on the shape of your front grille, though, you may be able to get some penetrating oil or some kind of tool in to the latch mechanism (the lever you need to press is on the very front of the assembly). Failing that, with the hood ...


6

If you really want a no-install option, and even @paulster2 answer seems like work then why not use old school locks like gear/steering locks? Or better, this -


5

I have never had problems with corrosion so I have not used dielectric grease on any of my car's battery terminals. If the battery already has corrosion on the terminals, then I would recommend disconnecting the terminals using a wire brush to clean off the buildup and then reconnecting the leads. If there is no corrosion then I would recommend just ...


5

I only see three options. Modify the hole where the spare tire goes, read cut and weld in a new one if there is room Find a way to mount it outside the trunk, like under the car, doubtful that this could be done. See if you can get the tire un-inflated in the same space, my 1991 Camaro came from the factory with an un-inflated spare, and a can of what ...


5

They make a head gasket leak detector kit to determine if it's leaking. I would be surprised if you mechanic didn't have one. If he or she doesn't they are not that expensive. Here is an example below See my answer here for more info.


5

Unless the lenses themselves are badly damaged, I would try to polish them up first. You can buy kits with most of the necessary polishes etc from a lot of detailing supply companies- the one I have experience with is the Meguiar's kit that comes with plastic polish and a polishing "mop" for use in your drill. You'll also need a roll of blue painter's tape ...


5

You don't have the air inlet selection lever set to recirculate, do you?



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