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7

Is there ever a case where only one would need to be replaced? Sure: rust will kill anything but it does tend to start at a point of entry and spread. It could kill one strut before it dissolves the rest of the car. Likewise, a side or corner impact could bend a single strut. how can I test which one needs replacing if this is the case? Realistically, ...


7

Strut mounts that tear a little are safe to drive with. The mounts themselves have metal inside them and are conically shaped at the top so they really won't fail unless you take the vehicle airborne and the mount rips. You should replace it though. That's a pretty good tear, and who knows how soon it could completely rip out. If you put it up on a lift or ...


6

Usually the bolts that strut braces attach to are the ones that attach the strut assembly to the car. The spring is held in place in the strut assembly by the nut in the middle, which I have never needed to remove to install any strut braces. See how the brace below has a hole in the middle for the top shock nut: This shock nut holds the upper spring ...


6

The weight of the car will be sufficient to keep the spring from decompressing fully and pulling out the bottom of the strut frame in the car. You must be careful not to jack the car up without the bolts secured tightly though, this could produce a dangerous situation. Also if you are ever working on the 'southern' half of the spring, where it interacts ...


6

Normally strut failure makes it to where they are ineffective in dampening the movement of the vehicle on the springs. This wouldn't cause a "rough" ride but in fact the opposite making it very soft and wavy. Where you'd hit a bump and the car would bounce multiple times as it settles back down on the springs. The strut reduces that movement allowing the ...


6

The only thing I see of any real concern here would be the left rear toe - it's off enough to possibly cause some tire wear. However, since it can't be adjusted, your best bet is to just rotate the tires regularly (every other oil change is a good rule of thumb) and keep an eye out for wear. You didn't say which Nissan you're driving, but I'm assuming it's ...


5

It has been my experience that the gas struts are similar to headlights. Occasionally one will fail early, but most of the time the second unit fails shortly after the first. If only one side is replaced it will take the load of the weaker side. This causes it to wear prematurely as it is carrying more than half the load. Also remember that any extra weight ...


5

The main reason to lubricate the threads on the coil spring compressor, is to make it a lot easier to turn the screw by hand, since there will be a lot of pressure on the threads. The lubrication will no doubt stop wear on the threads, but in the end, it makes it easier for you to tighten the tool. This will also be the reason for ensuring that the threads ...


4

I would imagine that if it was binding of the strut and it's seat causing the noise then the you would notice a few things in other characteristics of the ride. I say this What kind of car is this? (year / make / model / engine) How did you determine that the noise was coming in fact from the strut assemblies? Was the rest of the front suspension ...


4

One way to check the struts is to jounce the vehicle. Push down hard and release quickly on the bumpers and see how many times the vehicle bounces. It should be no more than 1.5 times, more than that and the struts are bad.


4

The tools to do it yourself can all be rented. The job can be difficult and even hazardous depending on the route you take to do it. You can do full strut/spring changes by buying the "quick change" strut assemblies. Or, you can disassemble the strut assembly to only replace the bad parts (commonly the strut and the bearing/top plates). That requires ...


4

There are two big things which are a detriment to riding on worn out struts and bushings: Saftey: Worn struts cause longer stopping times/distances as dead struts allow the vehicle weight to shift (sometimes unexpectedly) during braking. This weight shift is a lot more than when you are using good struts, so braking distances suffer. You also will not be ...


4

It depends vehicle specs, road conditions and driving habits. Shock absorbers are not carry the weight of the car, they are basically dampers. They restrict the amount of movement. In case of bump they compress and allow certain amount of resistance to slow down the movement. In rebound, basically the same function. So, without them, related wheel tend to ...


3

Lets start down your list. I'm assuming that your are referring to the rubber thing. This is a strut mount, not the strut mount bearing. The bearing is located between the spring and strut mount. Strut mounts just prevent noise and have no direct way affect safety. I don't believe that these would be picked on during a safety inspection. Of the list these ...


3

There should be some kind of sticker in the driver's side door jamb that will tell you a more specific date of manufacture.


3

when you describe "rough ride" most people associate that with stiffer than normal suspension and uneven road conditions making their way all the way from the wheel to your butt. In other words, any unevenness in the road makes it uncomfortable or difficult to drive. Reading your post, sounds like that's not your problem. If you have a constant vibration ...


3

Just did the front struts on wife's '95 Camry (V-6). Bought the quick-strut combo (Springs, struts, mounting plates, bushings, etc., no spring-compressing required) for $80 ea. on ebay. After you get the wheel off there's two bolts at the bottom (22 mm), and three nuts on top (easy to see with the hood up), and a bolt for the brake line. Piece of cake. ...


2

tl;dr: If you haven't done this sort of work before, I would NOT recommend that you try this on your own. I'm specifically wondering if these amounts sound reasonable (about $455 to $600); if anyone has ideas on how to get a better price on the job; and whether with a standard set of tools (the kind that a very casual handyman would have) and ...


2

The combination of that much camber plus that much toe will cause it to wear more quickly, but there's not much you can do about it without getting extreme in swapping parts. Keep rotating those tires so you don't burn out just the one and don't worry about it too much as I expect it would cost a lot more money to fix than you'll spend in extra tire costs. ...


2

The way to tell if your struts are worn out is this: Push down hard (lean into) the fender right above a wheel and then let go. The spring should compress when you push into it, and the car should come back up ONCE (slightly above the rest point) and settle back into where it was. If your shocks are not doing their job, your car will bounce 2 or more times ...


2

Wait what? Let's look at some physics here. If you have less grip in the front, your car understeers, you hit the tree and you die. If you have less grip in the rear, you ovesteer, you hit the tree and die again, not seeing what killed you. 1. Rear end Grip Shocks are important to maintain the balance of the vehicle in a turn and ensure contact of the ...


2

Bushes - If you've got the front end apart it's probably worth replacing these, unless they have been done recently. It's also probably worth checking the gaiters on the trackrod ends and driveshaft CVs, and any balljoints, easier to replace them while it's all apart too... IIRC there isn't much else that would wear out, but inspect the suspension arms for ...


2

You can check the rear toe in exactly the same way you check the front toe -- using the same string setup, parallel to the car's centerline, measure the distance from the string to the leading and trailing edges of the wheel. One thing to be careful of is that the rear tread (a.k.a. track) may be different than the front. When you're lining up your string, ...


2

Apparently this particular model suffers from this issue in cold climates. This is due to the factory o-ring failing to provide a good seal and thus allowing air to enter the Power Steering Pump Inlet. The fix is to replace the o-ring. A step by step guide to this is provided in this link


1

I haven't had time to research your state, but you should be able to look up the requirements on your state DMV website. The state standards vary wildly so you will have to check your state specifically. In NC they have to be really bad to fail inspection, but again in your state it depends on what the standards are. Without actually seeing what was moving ...


1

The shock absorbers do much more in a vehicle than just provide a comfortable ride. They are crucial to the stability of the vehicle, as I'm sure you know. They affect/prevent body roll, pitch, braking distance, etc, etc. If you've got worn shocks and the kids freak out in the back while you're on the freeway, you'll know what I mean! The part you've ...


1

You have just described the sounds of a failing shock absorber / strut. The top of your strut / absorber does not force out fast enough and creates the bouncing ball effect.


1

This could be one of several things: Swaybar links broken or missing Worn out strut/shock mount (on either end) Worn out suspension parts ... anywhere the suspension has a bushing which meets the car itself Without being there in person, it's hard to tell beyond that what it might be. I mean, it could also be a loose spare in the trunk area.


1

If you've got plenty of space when stationary, then something is allowing the wheel to move more than it should - most likely a failed bush or joint. Jack the car up and support it on axle stands, then check the suspension for movement. Try to shake the wheel in various directions, and try getting an assistant to turn the steering wheel from one side to the ...


1

Sounds like shocks or struts are blown. Maybe while replacing the front axle they damaged the strut or unseated the spring somehow? It is strange that is started right after the service. Can you feel that it is coming from the front-right? Or is it affecting the whole vehicle equally? Getting new struts or shocks would most likely solve the problem. Can't ...



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