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It could be that it's just getting worn out. Something you can check is to see if the exhaust is leaking around the manifolds ... look for black suet on the heads right at the exhaust manifolds. New manifold gaskets will fix this if it's actually the issue. This problem can actually affect the gas mileage as you will be sucking in oxygen at the leaks which ...


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In my experience this is worn brake pads, have them replaced. Sometimes they wear unevenly because of poor alignment, or a bad bushing, or a rock stuck in the caliper. Replace the pads. Inspect the old pads for abnormal wear patterns. Report back. If you aren't sure, take it to a mechanic.


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Is this happening only when the car is moving? Is it a cyclic event which happens faster as the vehicle moves faster? If so, I'd suggest your right front tire has slipped a belt. This is something which happens internally to the tire. The tire would be made up of several belts which help the tire to roll smoothly. If one (or more) of the belts slip, it ...


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Yes, the front wheel should spin more freely than the rear, for as you note, there is less on it to drag. As Steve says, a non-flat rotor would result in oscillation or pulsing when braking, which should be pretty obvious on a bike. You can check it for flatness using a dial gauge (or run-out gauge). My suspects would be a sticking caliper, or a failing ...


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I'm a retired mechanic, I used to work on private car's and some commercial vehicles. The principal of disc brakes is the same although details might differ between car and m/cycle. Don't even attempt any brake work unless you are competent and have the right tools. You mentioned the possibility of a distorted rotor. Can you feel anything untoward when ...


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It sounds to me like the previous owner suspected an outer CV joint (which was my first thought when you described the problem) and changing it didn't fix the issue. I would double check that the outer CV joints look new and there is a good chance the problem could relate to one of the inner CV joints. Diagnosing the problem will likely be a case of ...


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Following Nick's answer... There is sometimes a vacuum line that goes inside the cabin of the vehicle for HVAC controls. This line usually comes from the brake booster. Look at the brake booster's vacuum lines and see if there is one going through the firewall. If there is, try to follow it through the firewall and under the dash to the HVAC controls to ...


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That sounds to me like a vacuum leak. Most cars have servo-assisted brakes (the reason it's much harder to brake if the engine is switched off), which is usually powered by a vacuum line taken off the inlet manifold (so that as the engine sucks in air and fuel, it also sucks air out of the servo). If you look in the engine bay at the point nearest the ...


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CV joints will clack. Wheel bearings will grind, often only in one direction. CV joints will also have lash.



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