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38

In manual transmissions, the reverse gears use a different type of gear teeth than forward gears. Forward gears are helical gears, which have teeth that are pointed at an angle. When the gears rotate, most of the load is evenly spread due to the angles. Reverse gears are cut into spurs, which don't absorb the load quite so well. As a result, there is ...


14

Most likely cause for this is that you have some condensation built up overnight on either the belt or one of the pulley wheels, and until this has evaporated the belt will be able to slip a little, causing a squeak. Once the engine warms up, the condensation is gone. With a new, well tensioned belt, this shouldn't matter, however belts age and stretch, ...


9

I think you threw a wheel weight. Let's consider this quote from the great Wikipedia: When the wheel rotates, asymmetries of mass may cause it to hop or wobble, which can cause ride disturbances, usually vertical and lateral vibrations. It can also result in a wobbling of the steering wheel or of the entire vehicle. The ride disturbance, due to ...


7

It depends specifically on what's wrong with the starter. Sometimes you hear a clicking sound when you turn the key but the starter motor gears don't actually turn. This could actually be due to a weak battery, but if you know the battery has a full charge, then it could be the starter gears actually failing to turn. You may hear a whining sound, ...


7

After taking it back to the shop, the mechanic diagnosed it as "the back tire inside rim wheel weights are rubbing" (apparently they didn't rub when those tires were in the front). So rebalance the rear wheels and I'm back in business.


7

When you start the engine and you hear the sound, does it sound better after the vehicle is warmed up? A rod knock will only sound worse (louder) as the engine heats up. It will not go away as the engine gets warmer. If it does, it is probably something like an exhaust leak which closes itself as the engine manifolds get warm. The opposite could be true as ...


6

The front suspension has a lot of travel (e.g: bumps are fairly comfortable, but the car is 'rebounding' for a long while after the bump.) I'm going to go ahead and call it: you've used up your shocks. A lot of people forget that a shock (aka strut aka damper depending on your particular flavor) is a consumable part. It exists to damp out the cyclic ...


6

The single most common reason is something, often leaves or the like, finding their way into the fan. Regardless, you really need to remove the fan to fix the problem. If you don't know where it is then it's time to get that workshop manual you should already have to do regular maintenance and repair on the vehicle. once the fan has been removed rig up some ...


5

This sounds like a classic case of "heat soak". In most Chevy V-8's the exhaust pipe runs very close to the starter. The starter absorbs the heat, the heat increases the electrical resistance along with expanding the metal parts. The combination of the two can result in sluggish starts when the engine is hot. The symptons get worse as the starter ages. The ...


5

Beyond what jmort253 said, and separated out into a specific answer at Bob Cross' suggestion: I ran into a particular difficult to track down problem which was caused by the clutch in the starter opening up. The starter would wind up and make a screeching sound, but sometimes wouldn't turn the engine over. I was thinking it might be a broken tooth on the ...


5

Check the tension on the serpentine belts at the front of the engine - sounds like they're a tad loose. It may be something else, but start there.


5

Check to see how many volts the horn relay is sending to the horn. if it's less than ignition voltage at the horn either the relay is bad or you have a wiring problem. If you have ignition voltage at the horn make sure it's not touching anything and check for a good ground to the chassis. Otherwise replace the horn. Also sometimes the switch in the steering ...


5

Sounds exactly like worn brake pads to me. Have you checked those recently? Brake pads actually have a wear tab on them like the one pictured below. This is designed to make noise (that chirping sound) before the brake pads are catastrophically low. The noise would be present almost always while driving as the tab is meant to be in constant contact with the ...


4

Three possibilities occur to me right away: Nick could be right in this other answer: it could be a CV joint. Warped / high spot on the break rotor: this happened on my old Ford product, way back in the day. The brake rotor was ever so slightly off kilter that, when I would turn the wheel slightly left, the pad would touch the rotor lightly. Result: a ...


4

Grumbling noises while turning are usually CV joints. There are 4 of these (one each end of each drive shaft), but he usual culprit is the outer one on the side that is causing the noise - i.e. in this case the right hand one. To check, jack the front of the car up and support on axle stands. grip the drive shaft firmly in one hand (wear gloves...), and ...


4

I think this could be related to one if the gearbox synchronizers (take a look into this wikipedia article) to see what I mean, and the one that's failing is the one for first-second shifts, as you describe the issue. I hope that helps


4

To determine whether it's coming from the hub (and on which side), shift into neutral and lift the front of the car. (Set the parking brake and block the wheels very well!) Spin the wheel rapidly with your hand. You should be able to hear the same noise. To repair, usually you replace the hub. It is possible to repair a hub by repacking the bearings, but it ...


4

That sounds to me like a vacuum leak. Most cars have servo-assisted brakes (the reason it's much harder to brake if the engine is switched off), which is usually powered by a vacuum line taken off the inlet manifold (so that as the engine sucks in air and fuel, it also sucks air out of the servo). If you look in the engine bay at the point nearest the ...


4

It sounds to me like the previous owner suspected an outer CV joint (which was my first thought when you described the problem) and changing it didn't fix the issue. I would double check that the outer CV joints look new and there is a good chance the problem could relate to one of the inner CV joints. Diagnosing the problem will likely be a case of ...


4

tl dr: There is almost no way to tell from the video what is causing the noise. From the video it sounds like an exhaust leak causing the tick ... but smartphone video is notorious for not giving an accurate sound representation, so this is what you need to do. If you have a Harbor Freight somewhere close to you, go down and purchase an automotive ...


4

Sometimes it is hard to tell the difference between a rod knock, wrist pin or piston slap in the early stages even when using a mechanics stethoscope. A main knock is a deeper sound that is more pronounced at the bottom of the block as apposed to the top when using a stethoscope. Hard knocks that happen at startup and go away quickly are a sure sign it is ...


3

My best guess would be worn-out rubber bushings in the suspension components. Check the lower control arms, especially where they attach to the shocks, for cracks or complete deterioration.


3

The squeaking doesn't seem to be keeping up with the rotation of the motor, so that might imply a pully with a smaller diameter than the others. I agree with S_Niles assessment for the most part; it sounds like metal scraping or a hard belt slipping. One thing you might try on the belt is to rub a bar of soap on the inside of the belt. That will be enough ...


3

Edit: I wrote this when the title mentioned "squealing" noises. Since the noise description has changed, I'll have to get to a computer with audio to see if the video helps. I left the original post intact, because it may still be worthwhile to eliminate the serpentine belt and pulleys as a noise source. Original post: First thing that comes to mind is the ...


3

There are three things to check. First, check your u-joints to ensure they are in good shape. To do this, chock your tires, put it in neutral, and try to move the drive shaft ends at the yokes. There shouldn't be any play there. Second, you need to check your pinion angle. Basically, if you drew a line directly back from, and in line with the transmission ...


3

It sounds as though your brake pads have worn down to the metal Brake pads are considered a consumable in the car industry, much like oil or tires. Brake pads have material that is bound to a metal backing plate. When that material is used up the metal backing plate can begin to grind on the disc or rotor. Once the metal to metal contact begins a groove ...


3

You can adjust your valve lash You have nothing to worry about. Adjusting valve lash is a standard maintenance item and should be done upon any maintenance or tune up's of your vehicle. As you can see in the image, getting to the adjustment is quite simple. From there, follow your factory manual regarding reducing the amount of valve lash clearance. ...


2

I wouldn't spray oil into the vents. It'll likely make the air stink for awhile without helping anything. Many times the fan is accessible by removing a panel under the passenger side dash (right above where their feet would be). This may be the same location as a dust filter on some cars. If the fan is accessible in this area, you can try some lubricant. ...


2

It sounds to me that a leak in the refrigerant lines is a likely culprit. It gradually getting worse would be the gradual loss of the refrigerant as it leaked out. The hiss you are hearing now I would suspect is pressure created by the compressor being engaged and coming out of the point of the leak. If you just get it refilled, you will probably end up ...


2

Noise from the strain of the power steering pump can cavitate (or 'reverberate' is probably more accurate) through lines and even to the steering wheel itself. Check fluid levels, and pump condition. If it all checks out it may just be normal. Typically bearings will not seize when they are already in motion. They can fail catastrophically, but it is ...



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