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24

In manual transmissions, the reverse gears use a different type of gear teeth than forward gears. Forward gears are helical gears, which have teeth that are pointed at an angle. When the gears rotate, most of the load is evenly spread due to the angles. Reverse gears are cut into spurs, which don't absorb the load quite so well. As a result, there is ...


12

Most likely cause for this is that you have some condensation built up overnight on either the belt or one of the pulley wheels, and until this has evaporated the belt will be able to slip a little, causing a squeak. Once the engine warms up, the condensation is gone. With a new, well tensioned belt, this shouldn't matter, however belts age and stretch, ...


6

I think you threw a wheel weight. Let's consider this quote from the great Wikipedia: When the wheel rotates, asymmetries of mass may cause it to hop or wobble, which can cause ride disturbances, usually vertical and lateral vibrations. It can also result in a wobbling of the steering wheel or of the entire vehicle. The ride disturbance, due to ...


6

The front suspension has a lot of travel (e.g: bumps are fairly comfortable, but the car is 'rebounding' for a long while after the bump.) I'm going to go ahead and call it: you've used up your shocks. A lot of people forget that a shock (aka strut aka damper depending on your particular flavor) is a consumable part. It exists to damp out the ...


5

The single most common reason is something, often leaves or the like, finding their way into the fan. Regardless, you really need to remove the fan to fix the problem. If you don't know where it is then it's time to get that workshop manual you should already have to do regular maintenance and repair on the vehicle. once the fan has been removed rig up some ...


5

This sounds like a classic case of "heat soak". In most Chevy V-8's the exhaust pipe runs very close to the starter. The starter absorbs the heat, the heat increases the electrical resistance along with expanding the metal parts. The combination of the two can result in sluggish starts when the engine is hot. The symptons get worse as the starter ages. The ...


4

It depends specifically on what's wrong with the starter. Sometimes you hear a clicking sound when you turn the key but the starter motor gears don't actually turn. This could actually be due to a weak battery, but if you know the battery has a full charge, then it could be the starter gears actually failing to turn. You may hear a whining sound, ...


4

I think this could be related to one if the gearbox synchronizers (take a look into this wikipedia article) to see what I mean, and the one that's failing is the one for first-second shifts, as you describe the issue. I hope that helps


4

Three possibilities occur to me right away: Nick could be right in this other answer: it could be a CV joint. Warped / high spot on the break rotor: this happened on my old Ford product, way back in the day. The brake rotor was ever so slightly off kilter that, when I would turn the wheel slightly left, the pad would touch the rotor lightly. Result: a ...


4

Grumbling noises while turning are usually CV joints. There are 4 of these (one each end of each drive shaft), but he usual culprit is the outer one on the side that is causing the noise - i.e. in this case the right hand one. To check, jack the front of the car up and support on axle stands. grip the drive shaft firmly in one hand (wear gloves...), and ...


3

The squeaking doesn't seem to be keeping up with the rotation of the motor, so that might imply a pully with a smaller diameter than the others. I agree with S_Niles assessment for the most part; it sounds like metal scraping or a hard belt slipping. One thing you might try on the belt is to rub a bar of soap on the inside of the belt. That will be enough ...


3

Edit: I wrote this when the title mentioned "squealing" noises. Since the noise description has changed, I'll have to get to a computer with audio to see if the video helps. I left the original post intact, because it may still be worthwhile to eliminate the serpentine belt and pulleys as a noise source. Original post: First thing that comes to mind is the ...


2

To determine whether it's coming from the hub (and on which side), shift into neutral and lift the front of the car. (Set the parking brake and block the wheels very well!) Spin the wheel rapidly with your hand. You should be able to hear the same noise. To repair, usually you replace the hub. It is possible to repair a hub by repacking the bearings, but it ...


2

It certainly sounds like a wheel bearing from your description. An easy test for a wheel bearing is too drive the vehicle on a straight clear road at around 20-30mph. Mindful of traffic, turn the steering as much as possible to one side. After turning the steering one way repeat the steering of the vehicle as before the other way. When weaving on the road ...


2

Definitely replace your radiator cap. When mine gave me trouble it wasn't closing when it should which made fluid steam out which made the car overheat. If you're lucky it's all that's wrong and you can refill your radiator and move on. Mine didn't give me any more trouble after I replaced the radiator cap. I'm sure you can guess that I also recommend ...


2

I wouldn't spray oil into the vents. It'll likely make the air stink for awhile without helping anything. Many times the fan is accessible by removing a panel under the passenger side dash (right above where their feet would be). This may be the same location as a dust filter on some cars. If the fan is accessible in this area, you can try some lubricant. ...


2

It sounds to me that a leak in the refrigerant lines is a likely culprit. It gradually getting worse would be the gradual loss of the refrigerant as it leaked out. The hiss you are hearing now I would suspect is pressure created by the compressor being engaged and coming out of the point of the leak. If you just get it refilled, you will probably end up ...


2

Noise from the strain of the power steering pump can cavitate (or 'reverberate' is probably more accurate) through lines and even to the steering wheel itself. Check fluid levels, and pump condition. If it all checks out it may just be normal. Typically bearings will not seize when they are already in motion. They can fail catastrophically, but it is ...


2

If you're hearing a distinct gurgling, I'd start by looking at the coolant system. It's possible that the deceleration of braking creates a condition where the gurgling noise happens, maybe in the coolant overflow tank. The fact that this happens on a cold startup, and will happen again after only a one hour shutdown I think supports the coolant system ...


2

Whoever serviced your brakes probably tried to 'bleed' them, and if you hear gurgling I think it was done wrong. Now there's air in your brake system, and it's readily apparent the first few times you use your brakes each day as the air is pushed through the system. Needless to say, you need to have your brake bled properly. If you're comfortable with it, ...


1

Regardless of whether this is the core of the problem or not, it is worth changing the transmission fluid. There is a good chance that this was not done when the clutch was replaced, and who knows how long that oil has been in there. My friend had similar issues with her transmission and after changing her fluid (which was absolutely disgusting) almost all ...


1

It could be a wheel bearing. When they get worn they don't control the wheel and axle as tightly as they are supposed to, so they can "orbit" or move around within the bearing. My A4 has done this (apparently it's a common failure point on that model), the noise and vibration increase pretty linearly with speed. At first it sounds like a noisy muffler, ...


1

Beyond what jmort253 said, and separated out into a specific answer at Bob Cross' suggestion: I ran into a particular difficult to track down problem which was caused by the clutch in the starter opening up. The starter would wind up and make a screeching sound, but sometimes wouldn't turn the engine over. I was thinking it might be a broken tooth on the ...


1

I agree with Eugeio in that it sounds like a synchro. Have you changed the rpm point that your shift or hauling a heaver load recently then usual? In my truck if i shift around 2500-3000 RPMs with a decent load behind it the gears will grind a little bit. So if i shift before that point then i dont hear anything.



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