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6

Most of the time a ground loop is the cause of this problem. This problem is common especially if your stereos speakers are amplified, and can be fixed my making sure that your stereo unit and/or amplifier have a good ground connection. This can be done by either finding a more direct ground connection to the cars frame, sanding the area around your ground ...


4

For anyone who has similar issues I had a similar issue however I don't think it was exactly same. I tried the steps in the accepted answer with no success. Research on my own I tried different phones and noticed that some would have the static at low volumes and other would not. I looked online and sometimes the phone can cause this to happen. How I ...


4

You might want to try if your メニュー option (Menu) has a 設定 (Settings) option and inside there, a 言語 (Language) option. If it does, then most likely you can switch between the default 日本語 (Japanese) and 英語 (English). If you don't find it there but you own the car, it could be a matter of researching what Pioneer unit you have and get an update, but chances ...


4

Based on the details you have provided, your system is as follows: 4 Ohm coaxial speakers rated at 60w RMS (4) 4 Ohm subwoofer rated at approximately 400w RMS SVC (1) Your options include those you have mentioned which are common: A single 5 channel amp 4 channel amp + monoblock amp Having a separate amp for the mids/highs and lows allows you to have ...


3

So you want to keep the factory amp? I wouldn't suggest that. I'd recommend getting rid of the factory amp altogether, they're usually not the best, and it would be difficult - if not impossible - for them to work together. I google'd for a quick sanity check and I'll post a snippet from WikiAnswers: I wouldn't...first most after market amps require a ...


2

I believe it is fairly common place with aftermarket stereo systems. Look at this example from Crutchfield: I don't know much about them, other than that they exist. They do not in anyway modify your steering, just add a way to access controls at your fingertips.


2

My best guess would be that the surge blew the inline fuse in the wiring on the back of the stereo itself. You will need to remove the stereo and the fuse should be on the positive wire (usually a red wire). Its probably spring loaded push the ends together to turn the case and open it.


1

Faceplates are usually not interchangeable between models, however, I have heard the odd case of people doing this with Pioneer decks. While the new faceplate may fit in your Alpine head unit, all of the functions may not work correctly. The pins on the faceplate would have to match exactly with those on the head unit and thus the manufacturer would have ...


1

You can try adding some high grade capacitors in between you battery and the starter. This would reduce/ stop the main power surge you are experiencing. Also the car was designed for a smaller batter assuming a standard stereo installation. You are obviously running competition grade equipment and this would most likely require that you add a much larger ...


1

There are a few things involved in installing an aftermarket stereo: Where to Begin If the stereo is stock (more accurately if it hasn't been replaced with an aftermarket one), then you will need a dash kit if you want to make it easier and cleaner for yourself. A dash kit is what you would install after removing the stock stereo. It will come with a ...


1

If the other speakers are working and you've confirmed a valid connection to the speaker in question (at the harness), then it is likely either the speaker is dead or the wiring between the harness and the speaker is interrupted somewhere. In which case the best place to use a multimeter would be at the speaker itself. It is a simple task to remove the door ...


1

Unfortunately there isn't a lot you can do without taking the door panel off, and checking the speaker's condition directly. You can however check if the speaker is getting 12 volts from your wiring harness. Here is a link to what hopefully looks like your wiring harness in your Impreza. Take the multimeter, make sure the cords are placed in V and COM and ...


1

I tried a replacement antenna (aerial?) once, the antenna itself was great, but it had a defect in the base that attaches to the fender. The connection from the antenna attachment point to the wire inside was bad & would cut in & out. Testing it with a multimeter from the outside antenna (or outside attachment point, since your antenna's not bare ...


1

There are a couple of plugs in the back of the MK2 Seat Ibiza's radio that will easily allow you to connect it to your stock system. This will require some splicing of the wires, but definitely shouldn't be too difficult to manage. There is a power plug and a speaker plug. Make sure you're splicing into the correct one, or you could damage the system. The ...


1

My guess is it's fried. When you hook two batteries up in series (as you did), the resulting voltage is the sum of the battery voltages, so for a few seconds you had a 24V electrical system. I'm surprised the ECU didn't fall over as well, but perhaps it's better protected. Have you tried entering the unlock code? In my Audi, after I unhook the battery (or ...


1

Sounds like no amplification. I don't know hyundai and all but I had a similar problem with my volvo, they had a separate amp box that you had to have a special aftermarket harness to wire to to kick in the amp. Otherwise all you got was very faint tinny, no bass sound.


1

This may be because your speakers are wired out-of-phase ("+" to "+" on one speaker, and "+" to "-" on another. When this happens, the sound "cancels each other out" to some extent. To test this, adjust the fader and balance to isolate a single speaker (say, the front-left speaker) and see if the apparent volume increases.


1

Hyundai appears to call this feature SDVC (Speed Dependent Volume Control). Check your owners manual for how to turn this off.


1

Finally managed to solve this problem. There were two, different 4-digit codes: one on the back of the manual, and another on a separate card. The 4-digit code on the card was the correct one for the radio.


1

From the manual: http://www.pioneerelectronics.com/StaticFiles/Manuals/Car/DEH-X6500BT_OwnersManual112712.pdf Black to Ground Yellow to "always on" (battery, fuse protected) {saves memory} Red to ignition Blue/White to external amplifier (or insulated) Orange (optional) to park lights


1

You need to make sure that the head-unit is hooked up to constant power (usually the yellow wire on the harness). Make sure that it isn't hooked to a circuit that goes off after half an hour or when you open the door.


1

This question is already answered, but it is worth noting that a distinct stereo whine that changes pitch with engine speed can be indicative of an issue with the alternator and/or voltage regulator. The noise sounds like supercharger whine in such cases.


1

When converting the 12V DC from your battery to whatever voltage the inverter puts out, there are conversion steps internally to AC and back through switching the voltage. The switching circuit frequency is probably sensitive to the voltage, and as this varies (can be from 11 to even 15v in some cars) that could change the speed of the switching stage.



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