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6

I would not back the nut off to align the nut with the cotter pinhole. Doing so can result in the taper between the knuckle and the tierod becoming loose. The cotter pin would keep the nut from backing off but it would not prevent the tapered shaft of the tierod from spinning in the tapered hole of the knuckle. As @MikeSaull has suggested lube the threads. ...


3

I would use some anti-seize on the threads then tighten it to torque spec. If it doesn't line up then I would tighten it until it does. This is just what I would do. If it is a weak bolt or a really bad place for the threads to strip then I would just loosen it until it lines up. Once the cotter pin is in it shouldn't go anywhere anyways.


2

First stop driving it, it is potentially an accident waiting to happen. Any shaking, banging, wobbling etc should be addressed immediately. A couple of things come to mind. A bad wheel bearing can cause all the symptoms you describe along with an intermittent ABS light if the bearing has enough play in it (the hub wiggles enough to move the rotor away from ...


2

I always prefer to use a scissor-type ball joint separator, like this one rather than a fork-type one, if it'll fit. They're less likely to cause damage to other parts (and to the joints themselves, but that doesn't matter if you're replacing them. What's stopping you buying a fork-type one? They're incredibly cheap (the above site has them for £5, so less ...


2

I just stumbled across this entry in my factory manual, which says that overtightening is the correct procedure. The safe margin is given by rotation rather than torque, however -- up to 60˚ past the point where the specified torque is reached.


1

I would check the ball joints and tierod ends and control arm bushings. I have seen a lot of bad balljoints knock when the wheels hit the stops. I have also seen bad control arm bushings knock with acceleration and braking. Don't let it go for long without having it checked. If a ball joint or tierod separates you will loose control and your ability to ...


1

Sounds like it could be something wrong with your steering pump. Especially if this mostly happens when you have just started the car (cold engine) and are driving very slowly. Edit: if you have a steering fluid leak, this could be causing the steering pump to grind / knock. Try checking your steering fluid level and fill it up if it's running low. Then ...


1

Found these specs here: http://www.fixya.com/cars/t14840019-toe_in_specs_2005_cobalt It is an 2005 so it might not be perfectly the same as a 2008, but the specs have 0.20 as correct with a tolerance of 0.20 either direction. That makes me think you are right on spec and do not need an alignment. KEY: ± = plus or minus; C/t = Cross Tolerances; Toe T= ...


1

After a while, steering bearings can become filled with grit and grime, causing steering to feel not so smooth. Here are the steps to cleaning and greasing your steering bearings so that steering feels smooth and fluid again. Disassembly - In order to keep up with bolts, hand tighten bolts back in their respective receptor holes after removing components. ...


1

It's probably just the new motor mounts. If the new motor mounts are stiffer you will get more chassis vibration. I am a little surprised that shifting to neutral effects the vibration though. Is it automatic? Did they have to drop your transmission cross member or any drive shafts during the service. If so it could be something to do with that.



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