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10

The vehicle in question is a front-wheel drive. FWDs are sensitive to front wheel alignment, since the front suspension and wheel linkages work under different conditions when accelerating and not accelerating: on acceleration, the wheels push backwards on the road, thus tend to move the front suspension forwards relative to the vehicle. on ...


9

The only time you really need to turn your wheels when parked is when parking on a hill. Uphill you should point your wheels away from the curb. When pointing downhill you should point your wheels towards the curb. This is so if the parking mechanism should fail, the curb will hopefully stop the momentum of the vehicle and keep it from rolling very far. ...


7

What you are describing is called bump steer. This is caused by a toe change when the suspension travels vertically. Common Causes include Incorrect tie rod height or lenght steering rack that is not mounted parallel to the datum plane. bent steering parts structural damage to the vehicle I'd start by checking the mounting of the steering rack since ...


6

Found it was because a bolt holding the steering rack in place had sheared. Very dangerous and glad I decided to visit a mechanic!


6

You seem to be describing the weight of the steering, which varies from vehicle to vehicle. It isn't something to be concerned about. Many factors influence the lightness (or heaviness) of steering feel, including: steering/chassis geometry amount of hydraulic (power-steering) assist tire size I would be concerned if you cannot or struggle to turn ...


6

When you say OBD i'm assuming you mean generic data. The answer is outright NO. OBD generic data has no parameters that the alignment can be gleamed from. If the car has a steering wheel angle sensor then maybe you could tell if something is wrong. This data would be available in manufacturer specific. If the angle has been off for a long time at high ...


6

Drive by wire systems have no mechanical connection between the input decive (like a throttle/gas pedal) and the output device (like the engine). They use only electrical signals. To my knowledge there aren't any cars that use this system for steering. Your steering wheel is mechanically connected to the front wheels but is assisted by an electric motor. ...


5

I pulled the tires off and inspected the front end suspension and steering, and found that the sway bar linkage on the drivers side was detached.


5

First of all, that is the job of the shop where you did the alignment, not just the wheels they should also check if the steering is aligned with the position of the wheel (they are entitled to do so). Solution: You can definitely take it to the station back and show them the problem; there is a good chance that the engineer might have forgotten to do ...


5

tl;dr: Winter tires are different and you are sensitive enough to tell. It doesn't sound like you have a problem. It seems that you are detecting exactly what I detect when I put my winter tires on after the summer. Quoting from the Tire Rack article: New winter tires begin with deeper tread depths and more open tread designs than the tires used ...


4

This is called "cramping" the steering and it is bad for the pump and for the steering rack. What you are doing is forcing the system to try and push the steering components further than what they are meant to go. This causes over pressure on the pump (you may hear a slight squeal sound of the belt as the pump momentarily stalls), and it creates a bind in ...


4

The movement of the steering as you hit a bump is called bump steer, but this has nothing to do with what the beginning of your question is about. As you turn the wheel (you turning it, not bump steer), the geometry of the steering components are such that the inner tire (which ever it may be) will turn tighter than the outer wheel. It is this way because ...


4

It sounds to me like the previous owner suspected an outer CV joint (which was my first thought when you described the problem) and changing it didn't fix the issue. I would double check that the outer CV joints look new and there is a good chance the problem could relate to one of the inner CV joints. Diagnosing the problem will likely be a case of ...


4

You need to identify the source of the leak Clean everything in your driveway. Use Gunk, water soluble, or the like and get the Power Steering Fluid gone. Then: Allow everything to dry out. Validate any leaks...mind you, you have not started the engine since you cleaned EVERYTHING that could be consider oil out of the engine bay. Now, start it and run. ...


4

Note: this answer only addresses drive-by-wire; I don't know if you could tell whether the other systems employ by-wire technologies as readily. Drive-By-Wire : Look at your throttle body If it has a throttle plate actuated by cable, you have drive-by-cable, not drive-by-wire Drive-by-cable examples: Drive-by-wire examples: Notice the absence of a ...


3

from what you've said it sounds like an issue with the rear tyres, mismatching different makes of tyre's can throw the handling out as they all have different tread patterns (even more noticable in the rain because they aqua plane differently) couple of other things to check would be - Check all the wheels have been balanced properly check all the tyres ...


3

Depending on how well you know the feeling, the symptoms sound like they could just be a brief slip into oversteer: As the back end loses traction (which could be the case based on your description of the tyres) the car will feel like it is suddenly turning too much into the corner. Normally, however, once you lose the back end, it doesn't come back by ...


3

No, total toe is what matters, as long as your steering wheel is straight when you are riding down the road. Basically when those readings were taken the steering wheel may not have been pointing straight ahead. If the tech didn't still have the steering wheel locked down and the steering wheel turned slightly it would cause those readings. Another possible ...


3

It seems this issue is caused by one of two things. Bad steering sensors that are mounted on the rack Steering sensors need to be 'aligned' Problem seems to be that the sensors in the steering rack that tell the electric assist motor the position of the wheels and which way to boost the steering, left or right, are out of alignment. So there a sub-second ...


3

As Paulster2 says, as far as your car is concerned, it really doesn't matter, but if your parking brake/gear fails (from being tapped by another car, e.g.) you want the curb, if there is one, to act like a chock block. If there is no curb, then you want your car to roll away from traffic.


2

Your suspension is bent up and is a big mess. Goto a mechanic and get an estimate before it flies apart and injures you or innocent bystanders. I can see a wheel shaking, off camber and out of alignment while you drive down the road. This is not trivial. Imagine only one of your front brakes working well and you have to panic stop for a crosswalk filled ...


2

Apparently this particular model suffers from this issue in cold climates. This is due to the factory o-ring failing to provide a good seal and thus allowing air to enter the Power Steering Pump Inlet. The fix is to replace the o-ring. A step by step guide to this is provided in this link


2

It's possible the belts inside one of the tires is broken. With brand new tires, likely a manufacturing defect. A broken belt will make the car feel as you describe, and can be mistaken for the tires being out of balance. I've had this happen before. In my case, the tire was old and I hit too many potholes. One of the unique symptoms I remember is the ...


2

It sounds as though one of your tires may have a slipped belt. This is pretty hard to diagnose because there isn't any real physical manifestation of it except for one of more of your tires being out of round. I don't believe this shows up when doing the balancing because it's more of a rolling thing. You can, however, rotate the tires front to back and see ...


2

My first suggestion was going to be the wheel bearing. It still might be one of the rear bearings. I had this problem with my '06 Pontiac and the wheel hub (including bearing) was surprisingly cheap and easy to replace. You should be able to inspect the rear bearings much the same way as the front bearings. My second suggestion would be the CV joints. The ...


2

I've had this behaviour on a number of vehicles and a number of time. Each time it was caused by a different source. These included; Worn out engine mounts causing the engine / gearbox assembly to move around on and off throttle Worn out rear wheel bearing so there was excessive play and the rear wheel was effectively causing the car to rear wheel steer ...


2

I had this in one of my Mk1 Golf GTI's and what had actually happened was that the bulkhead had corroded and the steering rack mount came away from the bulkhead which caused the steering column to disconnect from the rack thus loosing all steering. Thankfully it happened at a low speed. Definitely a weak point on the Mk1 Golf and anyone else reading this ...


2

After referencing the comments above and taking it into a different dealer, I had it confirmed that it was the rack. It is a known issue with Audi's electric steering. They fixed it by replacing the rack.


2

Today, we don't only have cruise control. We also have cars which can park the car automatically in a parking spot. The driver just sits there and monitors the car, may be, he is responsible for gas and brake, but the car actuates the steering wheel. So, you just need to know how to use this for your own projects.


2

I'm not sure which pulley you're talking about, but would assume it's one of two: idler or tensioner. This is the pulley system of the 97 Lumina (should be the same for the 3.1 or 3.4 engine): Since this setup doesn't have an idler pulley, it would most likely be the tensioner pulley which is not aligning (if not the tensioner, please tell me which one ...



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